LA Street Vendors: A Better Economy through Low-Income Entrepreneurs

submission by bsoniawallace@elacc.org

Organization Name

:

East LA Community Corporation (ELACC) in partnership with Leadership for Urban Renewal Now (LURN)

Website

www.elacc.org

Indicator

Please select the one indicator that is most relevant to your project or organization: Income & Employment

What is your idea and how will it impact your indicator?

Though recognized for its street food scene, Los Angeles is the only city of the 10 largest cities in the US that does not have formal regulations around street vending. Street vending, as a widespread practice, is simply illegal. Vendors can be fined up to $1,000, be jailed for 6 months, and have their carts—their entire business—confiscated. This is bad for business, bad for customers, and bad for families.

East LA Community Corporation (ELACC) and Leadership for Urban Renewal Now (LURN) will expand income and employment for low-income Angelenos and small business owners through the Los Angeles Street and Sidewalk Entrepreneurs Initiative or LA-SSEI. LA-SSEI will promote partnerships between businesses and street vendors, start a venture capital fund that will provide working capital that will help support the growth of LA’s approximately 10,000 street vendors. By 2050, LA will decriminalize street and sidewalk vending integrate them into LA’s social and cultural life, providing Angelenos with affordable, convenient and healthy retail options. A developed pathway to success will allow a vendor to begin as an off-street market entrepreneur and end up as a fixed stall, certified farmers market retailer, or commercial tenant.

Politically, the support of established businesses is crucial to bring a policy change to the city. In this next year, the Street and Sidewalk Entrepreneurs Initiative will:



1. Build support for street vendors among brick-and-mortar businesses along major commercial corridors in Los Angeles;

2. Bring street vendors and local businesses to the same table in order to better support one another through listening and stakeholder sessions such as ELACC’s Policy con Pan Dulce and LURN’s PLUS2 conferences;

3. Create a venture capital fund for low-income entrepreneurs to allow street vendors to grow and further legitimize their businesses.



With these pieces in place, we expect to see:

1. A City-wide policy that supports street vendors, created in partnership with existing brick-and-mortar businesses who would benefit from street vendors marketing their businesses to pedestrians and passersby;

2. Closer coordination between businesses and vendors that increase profits for all involved;

3. A “Venture Capital for the ‘Hood” program that provides street vendors technical assistance and equity that allows them to scale their businesses and grow their bottom line.



ELACC and LURN believe this is a tremendous opportunity for the City to transform low-income business corridors and lift thousands of people out of poverty and unemployment through profits from vending as a source of household income. An IBISWorld Market Research Report identifies street vending as a national growth industry, with $1 billion in revenue and 8.4% annual growth between 2008 and 2012. Street vending creates employment and income opportunities for immigrant families with little start-up capital and low prospects in the formal sector. For many, street vending is the only way to legitimately take care of their families, break the cycle of poverty, and meet the demand for food in these communities.



The process for becoming licensed as a street vendor in Los Angeles is close to impossible to complete since there are many agencies to deal with and too many requirements that close opportunities to vendors. The best way to improve income and employment for these families is to give them the tools they need to legitimize their activities in the underground economy and formalize their businesses. And the only way to achieve this legislative change is through a ‘win-win’ partnership between street vendors and established brick-and-mortar businesses.

What are some of your organization’s most important achievements to date?

ELACC has been serving the Eastside of Los Angeles since 1995. On an annual basis, we provide affordable housing, community services, community organizing, and wealth building services to over 2,000 residents. ELACC’s track record includes leveraging over $135 million of investment to the Eastside and housing over 1,000 residents in safe, habitable, and affordable housing throughout East Los Angeles. We mobilize a Community Organizing base of over 1,300 members annually, and have helped over 3,000 families to purchase their first homes, avoid foreclosure, establish savings, and build and sustain wealth.

ELACC, community residents, and partner organizations have now come together to form the “Los Angeles Street Vending Campaign” to push the Los Angeles City Council to implement a policy that will provide a licensing process for vendors to sell foods without the fear criminalization. The coalition has already conducted numerous town halls throughout Los Angeles neighborhoods where there is a high concentration of street vendors, in order to begin educating and engaging them on what the City’s first comprehensive vending policy could look like.

Please identify any partners or collaborators who will work with you on this project.

ELACC’s main partners in the LA Street and Sidewalk Entrepreneurs Initiative is Leadership for Urban Renewal (LURN). LURN is dedicated to building community capital through advocacy, innovative community development strategies, and advisory services for change agents. LURN has been a leader in the Los Angeles Street Vendor Campaign and has been an important partner in researching the conditions of street vendors in the City, and designing financial products that meet their needs. Together, ELACC and LURN will work on developing policy and a sustainable system that supports low-income entrepreneurs that contribute to the economy and a better City in the year 2050.

More information on LURN at their website: http://www.lurnnetwork.org/

Please explain how you will evaluate your project. How will you measure success?

The LA Street and Sidewalk Entrepreneurs Initiative will continuously evaluate its activities to ensure it is meeting its goals. Success will look like:

• Direct engagement with over 250 businesses around street vending, including providing material and invitation to attend mixer events. Measured by reviewing ‘street team’ organizer calendars and reports of field action.

• Building connections between at least 50 vendors and small businesses. Measured by taking participant lists in at least two mixer events (such as Policy con Pan Dulce or Plus2) and conducting brief one-on-one follow-up interviews with at least 10 vendors to assess new connections and improve future events to better foster cooperation.

• Founding “Venture Capital for the ‘Hood” by going through the necessary process to become an authorized investor and developing a process to vet entrepreneurs in order to identify the best investment opportunities. In contrast to traditional lenders, LA-SSEI will not lend, it will invest. In exchange for capital, the initiative’s managers will negotiate terms with vendors for a minority “equity stake” in their business. A program staff will be assigned as an advisor or “board member,” and help the business grow over time. At an agreed upon point, vendors will have an opportunity to “buy out” the fund’s shares and resume 100% ownership of their business.

• Securing at least two other investors for the fund to support low-income entrepreneurs.

• Maintaining high standards for LA-SSEI activities and personnel. Measured by records of weekly check-ins between staff and managers, quarterly assessments of Project progress, and a comprehensive year-end report detailing successes, areas for improvement, and next steps.

How will your project benefit Los Angeles? Please be specific.

Street vendors are already an iconic part of Los Angeles’ national reputation for culinary excellence and innovation, as well a daily part of city residents’ lives. In low-income communities, almost everyone has a neighbor, a friend, or a family member who at least supplements their family income with street vending.

Although street vending as an occupation has existed for hundreds of years, it is often part of the underground economy, which means that it is a highly insecure line of work. Currently vendors are under constant threat from both the city and petty crime, which vendors cannot stop out of fear of police persecution. In addition, because vending is illegal, the city makes no tax or licensing revenue from it and pays fees for policing and storing confiscated equipment.

Through partnerships with small business, vendors gain a powerful ally in exchange for helping to revive and adorn empty LA sidewalks in front of those businesses. The creation of a forum that brings formal and informal businesses together will strengthen both sectors through idea-sharing and collaboration. Vendors will increase the capacity of their businesses and be more effectively able to fill market niches by understanding the existing business landscape.

In 2050, legalized vending will have moderate costs in the short-term from creating and enforcing new licensing, but will lead to tremendous long-term economic growth benefits. Entrepreneurs on the street operating will no longer fear legal repercussions and for the first time will be able to sustain and grow their businesses, invest more in equipment, and build meaningful relationships with small businesses. And, for those who wish, a legal system for street vendors will create an entrepreneurial pathway for them to grow into their own brick-and-mortar businesses in the City—businesses with a high likelihood of re-investing locally. Additionally, the whole City will benefit from new income from licensing and tariffs.

Developing of a venture capital fund to support street vendors will allow the City to invest in its low-income entrepreneurs. The fund will provide capital for vendors to buy new products, certified equipment, hire staff, or even pay for permits. Financial support will not be provided as a loan, but as an investment, in exchange for a minority stake in the business and a commitment from the vendor to work with a “board member” or “advisor” to support the growth of the business over time. At an agreed upon point, the vendor will have the opportunity to “buy out” the minority stake sold; money that will be re-invested into the fund to support other entrepreneurs.

Ultimately, support for vending has the potential to organically bring investment streams into the poorest areas and communities of LA. It will allow enterprising individuals to lift themselves up by their own bootstraps, creating their own jobs to provide for their families.

What would success look like in the year 2050 regarding your indicator?

Success will be a city in which every entrepreneur has an opportunity to grow and excel at their craft.

Imagine an LA filled with entrepreneurs, looking north to Silicon Valley and south to Mexico for inspiration. Imagine tamale makers with Ipads, their fingers on the community’s pulse, tweeting freely about their gourmet, safe, organic food. Imagine fruit vendors like personal trainers, tracking their clients’ nutrition and making sure they get their ‘5-a-day.’ Imagine coming for the food and staying for the shopping. Imagine safe, walkable streets with a pair of eyes at every major intersection that have the community’s best interests at heart, and the force of the LAPD behind them instead of against them.

In our 2050, street and sidewalk entrepreneurs meet with business owners to grow their clientele, and share trade secrets on how they can serve entire communities with fresh, homemade, healthy food. They will have access to business coaching and training, working capital for necessary purchases such as equipment, marketing and outreach assistance. Pockets of incubation along commercial corridors will build a supply network for consumers as mobile as the city of LA, and vacant lots in the projects will fill up with tried-and-tested businesses started in the streets. In our 2050, street and sidewalk vendors will be seen not as “hawkers” or “peddlers” but as specialty entrepreneurs utilizing patterns of urban movement throughout the day aimed at meeting the affordability needs of Angelenos.

Discussion
62 Pink-talk-bubble-tail

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congratulations, ELACC! another great project from a great organization.

by methodmonkey
12 months ago | Reply

Further food for thought: 15% of workers ages 45-74 are self-employed, with 30% starting their own businesses as a result of job loss. This AARP data is pretty general, but paints an interesting picture that street vendors fit into very well. http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/surveys_statistics/general/2013/Staying-Ahead-of-the-Curve-2013-AARP-Multicultural-Work-and-Career-Study-Snapshot-of-the-Self-Employed-AARP-res-gen.pdf?sf11935151=1

by bsoniawallace@elacc.org
12 months ago | Reply

As a Director of an international non-profit based in Columbus, OH, our group has kept a keen eye on the LURN movement. We are big, big fans of the initiative and would like to see it used as an international model. What better way to create a safer and healthier community than to arm the community with creative entrepreneurs? It's the epitome of the American Dream! This initiative is trans-formative and we support it fully!

by kathrynwwad
about 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks Kathryn! We definitely have an eye on the international model of street vending--some of the best research on street vending as a pathway to creating safer streets and employment opportunities particularly for women comes from reaserchers in India. And, of course, our friends at the Street Vendor Project in NYC are doing great work gathering data and advocating for the rights of vendors on the East Coast. It is high time LA joined the movement!

by bsoniawallace@elacc.org
about 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks for your support. Please continue to spread the word.

by janet.favela1
about 1 year ago | Reply

So grateful for these awesome comments, experiences, and feedback. @anisha thank you! @mari you

by rudyespi
about 1 year ago | Reply

am excited for what their collaboration will bring!

by anishathefirst
about 1 year ago | Reply

Together, ELACC and LURN will provide the grassroots support and technical capacity to advance real change for street food vendors. Instead of criminalizing them, street food vendors are our greatest hope for thriving small businesses in LA and we should support their endeavors. This is a wonderful project, and I

by anishathefirst
about 1 year ago | Reply

Street vendors are the fabric of the community and integral to the local economy. Not only should this effort be supported, but it should be duplicated across the country. I commend ELACC and LURN for their efforts to support legal street vending that strengthens all of our communities and our economy.

by zulytzul
about 1 year ago | Reply

As a street vendor I've learn the good and bad ...
Hi my name is Mari I've been a vender since a very young age , my parent have done it all from tacos, clothing , and fruit , it had been hard for us but is even hard when we have to run from the cops or the inspection . But we have we gotten tickets and you band it pero alli estamos otra vez no papeles no trabajo, so we hustle how ever we can , my jefa thought me how to work hard and make a dollar and even in those days where we don't make nothing or we can sale cuz andan los inpectores , and we have to sale from inside the van is hard .
But thanks for doing this for all of us vendors and so we can stop being afraid from some rasista cops always chingando !!! Sorry for the palabra but is true ..
Now I can teach my chavalita that making a bus on the street no es berguesa mas berguensa es andar pidiendo oh robar ...
She was born here so I know one day she will be a success Lla ke llo y mi jefa well we don't have the paper and this is our only way to live at the moment ...
My jefita and I sale fruit since 1996 -preset , I make artesania (earrings) hand made
My chikilla sales chips ,sodas and candy's
I've dream of one day all vendor have that days when we don't have to run it feel less then everyone ...
Es trabajo y se chinga uno ...
Thanks again for this and for helping us ...
"Vendors movement" !_!

by mariposas
about 1 year ago | Reply

Gracias por sus palabras Mari, I'm glad to see vendors on here sharing their own stories and getting behind the proposal! We thank you for your hard work every day and hope people reading this start getting to know their vendors and getting behind them in having the right to work.

by bsoniawallace@elacc.org
about 1 year ago | Reply

Gracias por sus palabras Mari, I'm glad to see vendors on here sharing their own stories and getting behind the proposal! We thank you for your hard work every day and hope people reading this start getting to know their vendors and getting behind them in having the right to work.

by bsoniawallace@elacc.org
about 1 year ago | Reply

Gracias por sus palabras Mari, I'm glad to see vendors on here sharing their own stories and getting behind the proposal! We thank you for your hard work every day and hope people reading this start getting to know their vendors and getting behind them in having the right to work.

by bsoniawallace@elacc.org
about 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you for sharing your first hand experience as a vendor. We are definitely building a movement in which people who work hard are celebrated and not criminalized. Please spread the word so that we can continue to grow.

by janet.favela1
about 1 year ago | Reply

Well if I had the opportunity I will make a differents , beside helping our community eating healthy and a friendly environment ..
I would be a dream come true to have a secure and save ,clean spot where we don

by mariposa.gonzalez.9
about 1 year ago | Reply

This is such an important project, and will improve the quality of life and access to healthy, affordable food for so many in LA...I fully support this!

by christinespehar
about 1 year ago | Reply

Your zip code should not determine how long you live..." says the CA Endowment. They are right. Healthycity.org gathers statistics and helps each of us take a look at our own community's health statistics. Why do you want to support this venture? Because you want healthier options for eating on the go in your neighborhood, don't you? There's more than one solution to bringing healthier food options to communities and this is one - a sustainable distribution system that helps small businesses succeed and residents have easier access to healthy foods. Take a look at statistics by zip code at healthycity.org. Here's the pattern from available 2010 stats. 2010 - hospitalization for obesity related diseases/diabetes. Beverly Hills 90210 - 55 hospitalizations for every 100,000 incidents, West LA 90034 - 108, Downtown LA 90012 115, Silverlake 90026 145, just a couple miles east of DTN in Boyle Heights 313 incidents and South LA 356. The question to ask is what we can do that's better for LA? One answer is to create a strong businesses model that can serve up healthier foods options for greater LA. Let's give a new way of eating on the run - a run in LA. JH LURN

by jeanmarie.hance
about 1 year ago | Reply

What a wonderful way to make Los Angeles even more vibrant, promote entrepreneurship, feed and clothe us! Getting the city and brick and mortars on board though is the real work. This well written and well thought out proposal just might get it done. Go for it!

You said "... A City-wide policy that supports street vendors, created in partnership with existing brick-and-mortar businesses who would benefit from street vendors marketing their businesses to pedestrians and passersby ..."

by mlbs
about 1 year ago | Reply

Check out my Facebook Mariposa Gonzalez I always post "my puesto "
Trabajado dia dia ...

by mariposas
about 1 year ago | Reply

Great ideas, great proposal!

by Cin785
about 1 year ago | Reply

This is a great proposal. I love the food of our street vendors! Fruta, tortillas echas a mano, quesadillas de flor de calabaza...se me hizo agua la boca. We can finally have an alternative choice to buy our food in areas where all we see if fast food chain restaurants. Street vendors are feeding us, keeping the streets safe, and giving the community an authentic cultural ambiance. They should not be criminalized for this. These folks are entrepreneurs and should have the opportunity to grow their business in the city of Los Angeles. This is definitely a much-needed effort as @keeptingitreal said.

by GeeG
about 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks GeeG! Reading your list of foods is definitely making me hungry! Must be lunch time... Thanks for your support on this, it is especially important in communities that don't have much investment in food access other than fast food chains.

by bsoniawallace@elacc.org
about 1 year ago | Reply

i am excited about this much needed work around street vending. i couldn't have picked a better collaboration to lead this work. i've always believed there could be a way to coordinate street vending to not compete with brick and mortar businesses or other street vendors. i can totally see a dispatch center that coordinates street vendors to areas of community where their products are needed. ¡Suerte!

by azufav
about 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you azufav! I think people's first concern is always competition, but there is good research that shows that, especially for retail outlets and for commercial corriders in general, vendors outside actually improve sales because they bring people onto the streets and let people eat and shop at the same time. Thanks for your support!

by bsoniawallace@elacc.org
about 1 year ago | Reply

This is a much-needed effort that will assist small business owners, many of them minorities, in providing a service that will undoubtedly enhance the quality of life for the impacted communities.

Diversifying the prepared food landscape under an established system of uniform regulations will help Los Angeles join other global metropolises that showcase the delights that their skilled residents have to offer those seeking dynamic cuisine experiences.

Even the city of Austin, TX, is already developing a solid reputation for street vendor food. The short of it is that there is no reason for a grand city like Los Angeles to lag behind any city in Texas on any front, including this one.

by KeepingItReal
about 1 year ago | Reply

thanks KeepingitReal - we could certainly do better than Texas

by fraudfix
about 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks KeepingItReal! Great post. Did you know that the laws on the books for street vending in LA right now are actually a century old, from the time when businesses and individuals would be responsible for paving the sidewalks in front of their own homes, making them jointly-owned property? The ban is just one of those on-the-books laws that, up to this point, has lacked sufficient political pressure to inspire change. We aim to create that motivation!

by bsoniawallace
about 1 year ago | Reply

Supporting street vendors is a great way to foster small independent business while expaning food choices. With LA being known as a hub for food trucks, it is crazy that we do not also foster street vendors. Regularizing their work can also help us find ways to encourage healthier food choices.

by UCLASteve
about 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you--while there was a massive push for food trucks several years back, which led to LA becoming a national leader in this industry, but change around street vending has been longer coming.

by bsoniawallace
about 1 year ago | Reply

Street vendors represent the very best of the American Dream: opportunity, diversity and community. They thrive in the shadows, despite police harassment and a precarious socio economic position. Legalizing street vending would change all of this and allow these small business entrepreneurs the opportunity to foster a legitimate pedestrian/community friendly climate we so desperately need in Los Angeles.

by Erin G.
about 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you Erin, well put. Our acronym, LA-SSEI, comes largely from the notion of laissez faire, or 'leave it to us'--this idea that removing barriers to enterprise can be one of the most effective ways to promote it, especially when it comes to unleashing the inventiveness of low-income folks.

by bsoniawallace
about 1 year ago | Reply

Bravo! This effort aligns with the LA I love and the L.A. I want to keep living in when 2050 rolls around. Legalizing street vending will positively impact L.A.'s very small business workforce, communities, and cultural spirit. If not now, then when?

by vero19
about 1 year ago | Reply

Hell yes. A very long time coming.

by anishshah
about 1 year ago | Reply

@Keepingitreal Thank you!!! We appreciate the connection to other cities. We

by rudyespi
about 1 year ago | Reply

I support this effort. Street vendors need to be supported, encouraged and protected. Good business practice. Entrepreneurship, en integral of a successful business climate.

by rosa.dennis
about 1 year ago | Reply

This is a great idea and great proposal. Street vendors are an important part of the rich culture of LA. They need to be protected and supported!

by pizat
about 1 year ago | Reply

I am so happy to see so many folks supporting this idea. Please repost, re-share, slam facebook with it. The vendors are counting on us.

by fraudfix
about 1 year ago | Reply

Sounds great! When business meets community in these types of ideas everyone involved wins.

by Dedward
about 1 year ago | Reply

Great proposal, I especially love "venture capital for the hood".

by lynbri
about 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks for the support, Lynnzi!

by luis.gutierrez.1044
about 1 year ago | Reply

Street vending should never have been criminalized in the first place. I

by ayme24
about 1 year ago | Reply

Ayme! Thanks for the support!

by luis.gutierrez.1044
about 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks for the support, Ayme!

by luis.gutierrez.1044
about 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks to everyone for their comments so far! Keep them coming. We need your help to make these ideas a reality!

by rudyespi
about 1 year ago | Reply

What a great idea!! Street vending is a great way to create jobs !

by manisa.rangsipat
about 1 year ago | Reply

street vending is the best part of traveling through Asia! It should definitely be legalized here

by sterling97
about 1 year ago | Reply

am so excited to see the support here. Hopefully as a result the vision detailed here will be realized far sooner than 2050.

by lstepick
about 1 year ago | Reply

This is a fantastic project that will serve economic development and social justice goals. Many street vendors have been working hard on this for years and I

by lstepick
about 1 year ago | Reply

This is a great idea/proposal! Let

by luis.gutierrez.1044
about 1 year ago | Reply

Great Idea.

by stianbrownrasmussen
about 1 year ago | Reply

Great proposal! Fully supportive!

by Viviana
about 1 year ago | Reply

I am still surprised that street vending is illegal in Los Angeles. People eat and people walk, day and night. Supply and demand folks, supply and demand. I

by jonathan.liu.1884
about 1 year ago | Reply

I'm excited to see these two fine organizations working with the street vendors who are such an important part of the LA culture and economy. I see legalizing street vending as a positing move towards healthy food access, from the standpoint of ensuring quality to the array of diverse ethnic foods that the vendors offer. These organizations really work to meet the street vendors in their neighborhoods, seek out their needs and offer the assistance that is most relevant. I look forward to the day that my "Legalize Street Vending" t-shirt becomes obsolete :)

by ranko.fukuda
about 1 year ago | Reply

I'm excited to see these two fine organizations working with the street vendors who are such an important part of the LA culture and economy. I see legalizing street vending as a positing move towards healthy food access, from the standpoint of ensuring quality to the array of diverse ethnic foods that the vendors offer. These organizations really work to meet the street vendors in their neighborhoods, seek out their needs and offer the assistance that is most relevant. I look forward to the day that my "Legalize Street Vending" t-shirt becomes obsolete :)

by ranko.fukuda
about 1 year ago | Reply

I

by ranko.fukuda
about 1 year ago | Reply

Projects like the "Legalize Street Food Vending" campaign deserve support because they work to maximize positive impact on every level, from elevating the business and leadership capacity of low-income entrepreneurs, to advancing healthy food access, safer streetscapes in LA. This campaign will put LA City policy to work in supporting the local economy and move us further toward a Good Food Region in Los Angeles.

by epork
about 1 year ago | Reply

This is a brilliant opportunity to transform lives in a direct way while boosting LA

by Brooklyn & Boyle
about 1 year ago | Reply

This is an awesome idea. Being a life-long born and raised Angelino - I have a close connection to street food, but particularly push cart vendors who keep my belly full, and provide an unmatched ambiance for the streets of Los Angeles. I

by fraudfix
about 1 year ago | Reply

this idea IS good. the approach--by strengthening community assets--facilitates longstanding political, cultural, and technical changes in communities. collectively, we need this project to thrive to demonstrate the impact of smart, responsible policymaking in underrepresented neighborhoods.

on another note, street vegetarian tacos are good, too.

by 501c3.yque
about 1 year ago | Reply

To me legalizing street vending is a no-brainer. Street vendors are hard-working entrepreneurs who are choosing to make an honest living. They create their own jobs, and often create additional jobs for family members and friends. And they

by sarahcbrennan@gmail.com
about 1 year ago | Reply

I support the Legalization of Street Vending because these folks are my neighbors and I get to enjoy some of the best food offered in Boyle Heights. Together we make Boyle Heights the beautiful community it is. It is also a matter of supporting their economic growth as local entrepreneurs who are challenging traditional notions of employment. In essence, Street Vendors solve the prevailing question of job creation by creating employment for themselves and their family and being the best at it. It just makes sense!

by fernandez87
about 1 year ago | Reply

So excited for these ideas!!!!

by rudyespi
about 1 year ago | Reply

Pink-ribbon-award-box-icon
Award_topvotedidea
$1,000,000 in total grants
Circle-1-inactive Step1-title-submission-inactive

Submission Began
Tuesday, February 26

Submission Ended
Thursday, March 28
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-2-inactive Step2-title-voting-inactive

Voting Began
Tuesday, April 02

Voting Ended
Wednesday, April 17
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-3 Step3-title
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address

Winner Announced
Wednesday, May 08

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