Backyard Homes: Sustainable, Flexible, Affordable Housing for LA

submission by cityLAB-UCLA

Organization Name

:

cityLAB-UCLA

Website

:

http://www.cityLAB.aud.ucla.edu

Indicator

Please select the one indicator that is most relevant to your project or organization: Housing

What is your idea and how will it impact your indicator?

:

cityLAB proposes to build, study, and publicly display a prototype Backyard Home using innovative, simple technologies that will create sustainable, affordable, flexible, livable housing for Los Angeles.



Los Angeles developed as a city of suburbs, where yards and gardens surround individual homes to create our distinctive neighborhood identity. But LA’s suburban sprawl also created a laundry list of problems, from traffic congestion to unaffordable home prices. cityLAB, a think tank at UCLA, along with Daly Genik Architects, have developed a new concept and construction technology for “Backyard Homes” that will maintain the beauty of the Los Angeles home-in-the-garden pattern, yet has the potential to provide a substantial supply of new housing. The idea is simple: on a house-by-house basis, owners can acquire and customize a Backyard Home. It arrives to the site packed flat, allowing it to squeeze past side yards and tight spaces. Once in the backyard, a foundation is erected, the flat-packed walls expand to become rooms, and a skin is added to the walls. Homeowners can customize a studio, one-bedroom, and two-bedroom arrangement, much like purchasing a new car with various interior packages to choose from.



In fact, there are 500,000 single-family home sites in the City of Los Angeles alone. Already a number of those half-million lots have illegal rental units in their garages and backyards. In 2003, the State of California passed the Granny Flat Law, to permit second units on single-family lots, and in 2009, the City Council acted to make backyard housing possible across Los Angeles. Our project recognizes that the illegal units reflect a real need for backyard housing that is safe, legal, affordable, and easy to construct. The recent state and city rulings provide the guideposts to creating safe, legal units; the cityLAB prototype will create a model of affordable, easy-to-construct Backyard Homes. With the laws and the model home, everything is in place for homeowners to build Backyard Homes that will create a much more diverse housing supply and a more livable Los Angeles.

What are some of your organization’s most important achievements to date?

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cityLAB, a research center at UCLA’s School of the Arts and Architecture, was founded in 2006 by Director Dana Cuff and Co-Director Roger Sherman. Since that time it has become one of the most well respected urban think tanks in America. cityLAB was featured in Architecture Magazine, on CNN International News, in Newsweek Magazine, and in the American Pavilion of the Venice Biennale. It gained worldwide recognition and the national spotlight with its open design competition, WPA2.0-Working Public Architecture, the results of which were presented to lawmakers in Washington DC and key members of President Obama’s urban advisory team. cityLAB’s important role in Los Angeles is increasingly evident through its frequent mention in the news, its work to revitalize Westwood Village, its studies about the ways high speed rail and transit systems can improve civic life, its role in advancing new urban policy, and its championing of good design in our region. cityLAB is successful when it explores new ideas for urban design that reach the public, students—our next generation of urban activists, and urban leaders of all stripes.



Daly Genik Architects is partnering with cityLAB to design and test the Backyard Homes prototype. Daly Genik, founded in 1990, is an award-winning design practice with a focus on craft, construction systems, and material research. The firm’s work highlights the interrelationship of research and fabrication, sustainability and livability, utility and form. Firm Principal Kevin Daly has designed some of the area’s most outstanding affordable housing for the Santa Monica Community Corporation, as well as widely recognized technological innovations that serve environmental goals, such as a model daylighting system at Art Center’s Pasadena campus.

Please identify any partners or collaborators who will work with you on this project.

:

The project will be undertaken by the internationally recognized team of UCLA’s cityLAB and Daly Genik Architects who have been collaborating for the past six years. Our partners have included the LA City Planning Department, Los Angeles Housing Department, non-profit housing corporations, various departments and faculty members at UCLA, a range of community organizations, Habitat for Humanity, Stanford University’s Engineering Department, and Buro Happold Engineers. Because cityLAB is a university-based research center, students are involved in all the work we undertake. About 100 architecture and planning students have been part of the Backyard Homes effort to date. All collaborators have donated their services and will continue to do so.

Please explain how you will evaluate your project. How will you measure success?

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We propose to build a demonstration prototype specifically so that we can evaluate its performance on a number of measures. This is a real research project as well as a public demonstration of new housing technologies. We will measure the success of the Backyard Homes demonstration project in the following ways:



1. Cost. We will evaluate the prototype in terms of cost, with the goal that it should cost less than half of prevailing per-square-foot residential construction, or approximately $50,000 for a small unit.



2. Environmental Impacts. The prototype will be evaluated in terms of environmental impacts on a range of measures, with the goal that it should outperform standard home construction by a factor of 10. We will study approximately two dozen different impacts such as recyclable materials, production of carcinogens, summer smog, acidification, sourcing and shipping, assemble-to-disassemble impacts, etc.



3. Ease of Construction. The assembly of the prototype will be documented to both evaluate and record how easy it is to install. The installation in the Hammer Museum courtyard will itself be part of the exhibition, allowing the public to observe, first-hand, the methods of construction and the “backyard squeeze” in practice.



4. Public Response. We will collect responses from visitors to the Backyard Home exhibition during the two to four weeks it will be installed in the museum’s publicly accessible courtyard and will begin to develop relationships with potential developers and owners of Backyard Homes.

How will your project benefit Los Angeles? Please be specific.

Backyard Homes will benefit Los Angeles by making it more livable in three substantial ways.

First it will improve our housing, by making it more affordable, more flexible, more sustainable, and more livable. According to a preliminary study by Stanford University engineers, compared to a typical house of the same size, the Backyard Home has a ten times to as much as a hundred times lower environmental impact. The simple construction system will make it possible to acquire a Backyard Home the way you might buy a car, will leave no foundation if and when it is disassembled, and will be adjusted or customized to each yard and household need. A family that needs more space can find it in their own backyard. A family that wants to reduce its mortgage payment can do so. A Backyard Home can provide a home office now, and become a caregiver apartment later.

Second, it will improve neighborhoods. Now, when a family’s circumstances change, they often need to move to a new community where housing is cheaper, bigger, smaller, or in some way more suitable to their new needs. This creates neighborhoods in constant flux. Neighborhoods will have greater stability when people can stay in place through the various stages of their lives. Neighborhood stability has profound benefits for the residents, from improved quality of life, to improved educational outcomes, to improved health outcomes. In addition, Backyard Homes is a solution that can replace unwanted infill housing development such as large apartment buildings or condominiums that change neighborhoods in unwanted ways.

Third, Backyard Homes will improve the city as a whole, by helping reduce sprawl, traffic, and greenhouse gas emissions. The innovative construction and design technology can set a new standard for housing in the city, demonstrating that Los Angeles can grow inward instead of outward, while at the same time growing more sustainably, more beautifully, and more affordably. In the same way that mid-century modernists championed a new form of home through technology and design in 50s-era LA, Backyard Homes can make Los Angeles more Angeleno for the twenty-first century.

What would success look like in the year 2050 regarding your indicator?

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In 2050, if Backyard Homes had spread to just 20% of the 500,000 single family lots across Los Angeles, we would have a full 100,000 new, affordable, sustainable homes and yet our neighborhoods would hardly look any different! The beauty of Backyard Homes is that they maintain the character of existing communities, because they are tiny additions that when taken together have immense implications. Unlike the usual bulky, block-busting apartment buildings or condos, Backyard Homes are built incrementally and can be controlled not by the developer, but by the neighborhood.



If we could see inside each home, what we would notice would be fewer misfits between the old suburban house-type and the wide variety of current households: fewer families doubled up, fewer college kids struggling to make ends meet, fewer households moving when they reach the “empty nest” stage of life, fewer homeless people, fewer nannies and caregivers having to commute long distances to their jobs, fewer aging parents placed in institutions far from their families.



In 2050, we could look at measures of Backyard Homes’ success via quantifiable measures: there would be fewer home foreclosures, more affordable rental housing available, shorter commute times from home to work, increasing numbers of legal backyard units, and an abundance of new types of Backyard Homes in addition to this prototype developed by cityLAB.

Discussion
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Nice work!

by eoanna
over 1 year ago | Reply

The cool thing about it is that it will fit any space-shape! Great thinking!

by tononunez
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks. If we can build this through LA2050, it will be incredible.

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

I want to do this! How might one find such a place in La 2014?

by dr.ericka
over 1 year ago | Reply

Let's build one in 2014 by winning LA2050! Get your friends to vote soon...

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

Great idea! Love seeing a way to make use of available space to create affordable and sustainable housing!

by neil.paradise
over 1 year ago | Reply

This is so awesome! I would love to be able to do something like this as our parents are getting older and will likely need to move in with us. It would be so great if we could have access to this sort of thing sooner than later!

by prozhkova
over 1 year ago | Reply

The cool thing about it is that it will fit any space-shape! Great thinking!

by tononunez
over 1 year ago | Reply

Working for a small, built out coastal California city, this is exactly the kind of afforable, small scale living we need!

by S. Hardgrave
over 1 year ago | Reply

Great idea!

by terence.milstead
over 1 year ago | Reply

Really a clever and amazing project :)

by MGuaralda
over 1 year ago | Reply

d cuff and k daly, you are planning and design heroes of mine. so glad to see your and your students work get such broad exposure.

by quagmire
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks so much-- and you are very right that there are a number of great students and graduates from UCLA who have contributed to the project -- PJ, Jonathan, Bianca, Chinh, Nate, Linda, Lio, Amelia W, Maria, Richard --- and more. Thanks to all.

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

I can't imagine a family that wouldn't have a use for a BYH! Such a responsible, progressive idea!

by acayer
over 1 year ago | Reply

I agree—let's make use of the space we already have, instead of trying to create new space and continuing to spread our city out even further.

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Great idea!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

I would definitely use a BYH.

by trina.albus
over 1 year ago | Reply

With LA2050 support, you will get closer to that reality!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

can't wait to see what a full prototype looks like.

by sampaige20
over 1 year ago | Reply

Neither can we!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

There are SO MANY uses. We agree!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

An affordable investment for LA families.

by mike.walczuk
over 1 year ago | Reply

An affordable investment for LA families.

by mike.walczuk
over 1 year ago | Reply

And it would also give them control over what they want. Thanks for posting Michael.

by luigi89ca
over 1 year ago | Reply

I can think of 3 families in my neighborhood that would benefit by building in their back yards.

by nylopez
over 1 year ago | Reply

It would make their lives much more comfortable and secure.

by nylopez
over 1 year ago | Reply

Everyone we talk to needs more flexibility in their present home.

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

I'm a college student and I can imagine it would work very well for roommates too!

by Julian_D
over 1 year ago | Reply

I

by Julian_D
over 1 year ago | Reply

This project is garbage on so many levels, it appalls me to see the glowing comentary.

First the litany of problems:
1. Material-wise, the construction system extrapolates from some simple geometry to a solution that is simple not feasible. Not only is the brilliance of the modularity of the brick, the cmu or the 2x4 lost by instead creating some manufactured construction system, the basic material performance for moisture, insulation and likely longterm stability of a modulsar system is, based upon previous experiments with construction systems like this (fuller's dome, etc) is unconvincing. The inherent benefits of a manufactured/adaptable system are it's draw back as a functional enclosure system.
2. Design-wise, boxes work. Examine the hundreds, if not thousands of guest/inlaw houses in LA and you'll see that he best design is a box with a water shedding roof. Geometries with multiple curves do not work. They don't work for windows, they don't work for furniture, they don't work for repairs. Complex and simple curves fail on every examination of the life cycle use and repair of any building. Curves may be sexy when anthropormorphized, but they are not sexy on buildings, they are extremely special and should be used with tremendous restraint because of the complexity in use and function that they impose.
3. Piggybacking on Backyard Homes doesn't make this a good backyard home. Yes, it's clear that backyard homes is one way to deal with 'incremental densification' as the well coiffed Sir mentioined, however it's not the only way, nor necessarily the best way to do that since the costs include all the benefits that come with gardens, espeically with a 'plop down' proposal like this one. Better Backyard Homes proposals include alley access where possible, garage conversion with additional stories. See Toronto's alley ordinance for an example of a well thought out Backyard Homes proposal.
4. The economy of production fails by being centralized and not distributed. A good design system makes it possible for many people do the work. Just because many people can fold or unfold their accordian homes doesn't mean that when something goes wrong they won't all be calling 1-800-FoldAHouse, to have a specialized technitian to come out and fix this hinge or that connection.
5. Plumbing and Electrical housing infrastructure is essentially abandoned in favor of formal geometric complexity. This means that while the space can be expanded or contracted as the residents might require, their housing infrastructure will have to be located in a single fixed location. This makes the flexitbility an aethetic order, and not a functional one.
6. Non standard windows, non standard doors. Why propose higher levels of construction complexity for something that is suppose to be economically empowering to people who are facing foreclosure.
7. Cost. Considering the proposal, the costs are likely completely unrealistic. Try life cycle costing this, considering the built in costs of getting facilities up and running to manufacture this. A log and a saw can build a house, I've seen it done. 2x4s are essentially that. I imagine that the costs will be likely 3x to 4x the current predicted costs.

In conclusion, while your presentation does a good job at outlining how a Backyard Home design could aid in Los Angeles' housing situations, The cityLAB Backyard Home design, upon which you spend the least of your words describing, is an abject failure.

by cfranco
over 1 year ago | Reply

So what's your great idea?

by Metrocologist
over 1 year ago | Reply

This collaboration of institution and design is unparalleled, the potential for backyard homes to improve affordable (and beautiful) housing in LA is great. This gets my vote.

by urbanLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

I totally agree.

by amimarie
over 1 year ago | Reply

Couldn't agree more. Would love to see one of these in real life!

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago

Many thanks!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Congrats cityLAB

by MonicaRaymond
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks. It also ties the house to the city -- a connection that Los Angeles made but with the opposite results in the postwar period by creating all our sprawl. Backyard homes could reverse that trend.

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

What about building codes, plumbing, electric, insulation, ect for the area to be expanded, would it change the property tax rate?

by NaomisNutritionNook
over 1 year ago | Reply

One aspect of this experiment is to assemble a housing unit that would be possible to assemble and disassemble more readily than a conventional house. We are exploring whether it could be governed by the regulations of a mobile home, as a result.

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

Having shared my critique I realized that I got lost in the details of the actual proposal. Here's the big picture critque -- This is re-inventing the wheel. There have been such initiatives of all stripes underway everywhere, from Granny Flats, to -as mentioned- garage and basement conversions. The idea of a "abode-in-a-box" is also a "here we go again" idea. Instead I encourage cityLAB to ask "What is the problem trying to be solved here?" If it is a problem, what are the various ways of going after it, and where does thisidea fit into that agenda. Lesson: Don't grab the cute idea, grow out from the core problem.Here's my expert advice: Always cast what you are doing within the context of the bigger problem. Don't cast it in terms of a cute solution to a miss specified problem.

by cfranco
over 1 year ago | Reply

A BYH would be the perfect solution for the stay at home professional who enjoys the comfort of working at home, but lacks a designated work space. Great work.

by luigi89ca
over 1 year ago | Reply

SO TRUE... I could save both time and money by

by myriamCO
over 1 year ago | Reply

... save time and money by not having to comute 20 minutes to work everyday. All I would need is the internet and a BYH.

by myriamCO
over 1 year ago | Reply

commute*

by myriamCO
over 1 year ago

It's equally good for empty nesters, unemployed grown kids, caregivers, --you name it. All the suburban houses that were meant for the Ozzie and Harriets of the world can be adapted to modern families!

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

OK, I want to understand this. Can someone please explain to me how we can alleviate parking and traffic problems by doubling the number of houses in a neighborhood?

by gene.bivins
over 1 year ago | Reply

The law for secondary units requires on site parking. And because Backyard Homes are incremental -- neighborhoods just get one at a time-- if traffic or street parking are impacted, the neighborhood can control its own destiny.

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

Great! Thanks Dana.

by luigi89ca
over 1 year ago | Reply

What a fascinating use of space—way to think outside of the box. I think this is a practical way to increase housing without increasing the city

by trina.albus
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks. I agree -- one of the best things about backyard homes is that we could really make more and better housing available, without changing the character of the city or our neighborhoods. It's about time to build back inward, instead of ever-outward.

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

...without increasing the city footprint. Backyard housing has great potential to help create safe, livable and sustainable neighborhoods.

by trina.albus
over 1 year ago | Reply

Well put! I think we can densify Los Angeles without changing that Angeleno character we love—which is strongest in those compact old neighborhoods that are pedestrian-friendly!

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you and we agree—and we don't change the "Angeleno" character of housing in LA

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Great project cityLAB!

by sampaige20
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

All these great partnerships bode well for a beautiful and sustainable way to live in LA.

by amimarie
over 1 year ago | Reply

UCLA A.UD + Hammer Museum + Daly Genik Architects = a recipe for success!

by trina.albus
over 1 year ago | Reply

Awesome!

by sampaige20
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago

We like your math.

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Agreed, We have great partners and are grateful for their support.

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Fantastic idea. BHY has great potential not only to make housing more affordable, more flexible, more sustainable, and more livable, it will also improve neighborhoods and Los Angeles as a whole. Congratulations cityLAB on a great project.

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks for your support! Come back and vote for our submission starting Tuesday, April 2

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

How long is the voting open?

by urbanLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

until the 17th!

by amimarie
over 1 year ago

You can only vote once from today until the 17th

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago

Agreed! Congratulations cityLAB.

by MonicaRaymond
over 1 year ago | Reply

BYH is an innovative and pragmatic housing solution. Providing tools that let individuals build small scale housing in their own backyards assures that it will be neighborhood scaled, controlled by community residents, safe (they will be in people

by Jb0112
over 1 year ago | Reply

Yes, thanks!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

I think the low-cost is the clincher. And good design makes it easier on the nieghbors

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Well said!

by amimarie
over 1 year ago | Reply

I can't imagine a better way to foster community.

by trina.albus
over 1 year ago | Reply

Neither can we!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

With such an interesting group of supporters, I'm sure this design will be implemented in equally interesting ways throughout the city.

by MonicaRaymond
over 1 year ago | Reply

When does the voting start??

by MonicaRaymond
over 1 year ago | Reply

So many possibilities for improved family dynamics! Grandparents could care for grandchildren, disabled adults could live independently but adjacent to their families, improved options for households requiring a caregiver, etc. I am thinking of an elderly couple in my neighborhood who are lucky to have an apartment attached to their home whose residents are the center of their caregiver network. The expansion of this model through affordable construction on existing parcels will improve our communities and our families. A great idea!

by abbyarnold
over 1 year ago | Reply

That's exactly right -- we see the Backyard Home as not only a building type, but also as a mechanism to build stronger communities and families. Thanks!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Could not agree more. I'd like BYH's to start growing in backyards throughout the community.

by amimarie
over 1 year ago | Reply

With the support of LA2050, we can make that a reality!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago

Haha I like the idea of "growing" backyard homes!

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago

right on.

by sampaige20
over 1 year ago | Reply

Agreed!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

This project is great! Its beautiful, green, flexible, and will reduce traffic! you guys really thought about all aspects of this project.

by Sam_G
over 1 year ago | Reply

Many thanks! It's been 6 years in the making!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Let's see this thing happen!

by marie_cu
over 1 year ago | Reply

We're with you!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago

Transportation is a huge issue in Los Angeles. The Texas Transportation Institute named it the most congested city in America, after Washington, DC

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Great insight. Yes BYH can help reduce our transportation woes and hopefully get us off that list!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

YES!

by sampaige20
over 1 year ago | Reply

Yes indeed

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Great Idea. Finally, an elegant solution that tackles the much-needed affordable housing issue in LA.
Dan

by dan.oprea.10
over 1 year ago | Reply

It is a demonstration that affordable housing can also be green and beautiful.

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

Without compromising flexibility for individual needs

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Without compromising individual expression!

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Hear hear

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

I love the models in the video. Elegant indeed!

by trina.albus
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks for the kind words

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

LA needs this prototype!

by ameliad
over 1 year ago | Reply

I cannot wait to see it!

by trina.albus
over 1 year ago | Reply

This is amazing, I want one for my backyard!

by Julian_D
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

What kind would you build for your backyard?

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

A home office studio would be my first use of a BYH. Or a guest house. Or a rental property. The possibilities seem endless.

by trina.albus
over 1 year ago | Reply

Great ideas

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago

Same here!

by ameliad
over 1 year ago | Reply

Me too, but not for grandma! For me!

by amimarie
over 1 year ago | Reply

Exactly. There are endless applications and uses.

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago

Sign me up!

by trina.albus
over 1 year ago | Reply

With your support, we can make this happen

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Great job; I

by janetlevin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

We need a couple of these in the neighborhood.

by ameliad
over 1 year ago | Reply

I wholeheartedly concur!

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Great work, CityLAB!

by bsiegl
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

There may be some of your own work embedded in all this!

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

Yes congrats!

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

The prototype should be incredible -- and it will be on public display for everyone to see. Kevin

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

I hope you document the construction to show how easy it is to assemble. Is there a target date for it to show at the Hammer Museum?

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

What a great idea. Can

by fougeron1
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

This would look good in a backyard near YOU!

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

Who would use BYH? Students? the Elderly? Recent grads returning home?

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Very nice!

by PJ Dahl
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

I share your enthusiasm, PJ!

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

So do we!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

PJ, your own hand and intelligence are part of this effort!

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks PJ!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

+1 PJ!

by trina.albus
over 1 year ago | Reply

I can

by acayer
over 1 year ago | Reply

Ha I think you got cut off—but yes I also think this is a very realizable project.

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks. It

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks for taking a look at our project! Please comment, vote, and tell your friends!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Can't wait to see this at the Hammer!

by ameliad
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks -- us too!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

How long will it take to construct the prototype?

by marie_cu
over 1 year ago

Congrats on a great project and on your partnership with the Hammer Museum and Daly Genik Architects!

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

A radically pragmatic idea for affordable living in Los Angeles--I would expect nothing less from CityLAB!

by jonyoder
over 1 year ago | Reply

Radical pragmatism -- what a concept to aspire to! Thanks for the support!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

To be called radical and pragmatic bya Lautner man is a high compliment.

by dana.cuff.3
over 1 year ago | Reply

Indeed it is!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

There is nothing radical about reforming housing in LA home by home and neighborhood by neighborhood.

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

BYH is an innovative and pragmatic housing solution. Providing tools that let individuals build small scale housing in their own backyards assures that it will be neighborhood scaled, controlled by community residents, safe (they will be in people

by Jb0112
over 1 year ago | Reply

Yes, we want this to be not only a object that can be purchased and used, but also a tool that allows individuals to have a greater degree of control of their futures! Thanks for the support!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Backyard Homes scales the housing conversation to the neighborhood level. It is the accumulation of these small, incremental changes that will produce significant housing reform in our city.

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

We couldn't agree more

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Fun, beautiful, green, flexible; everything I would want in my backyard!

by joanling
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks for the support!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Don't forget it's also affordable!

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

I love the flexibility of the design that provokes us to consider and appreciate LA

by diane.favro
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Flexibility (and affordability) is key in addressing Los Angeles' housing issues

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

SO COOL!

by ameliad
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

What is your favorite part about BYH?

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

This is a novel approach to housing in high cost areas such as Los Angeles from an exceptional team of researchers and designers. What I like most is the interdisciplinary and rigorous evidence base that this project will create for understanding how strategies like this may be used in other cities in the US and abroad. Very exciting!!

by lois.takahashi
over 1 year ago | Reply

Yes, we're excited to be in LA, which has been an important testing ground for urban experiments as long as it has existed! Thanks for the support!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

I agree this has applicability beyond Los Angeles...it could work wherever there is need for more density and infill development.

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Keep up the great work cityLAB and Daly Genik!

by marie_cu
over 1 year ago | Reply

Did you see their presentation at the Venice Biennale?

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

IF you get the grant... will you film the construction of the prototype? I would love to see this incredible technology take shape.

by ameliad
over 1 year ago | Reply

That is a fantastic idea. Did you see the project video? http://bit.ly/11cloD5

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Awesome video, I would also love to see the first prototype built.

by amimarie
over 1 year ago | Reply

Let

by MonicaRaymond
over 1 year ago | Reply

Let's get this thing done! We've been waiting for this!

by MonicaRaymond
over 1 year ago | Reply

What kind of backyard home would you build?

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

The answer has been behind us the entire time. Brilliant!

by ameliad
over 1 year ago | Reply

Yaaa seriously!!

by Julian_D
over 1 year ago | Reply

Yep, right in our own back yards!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

That is so clever. LOL

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

58-12 Design Lab loves Backyard Homes! What an innovative use of our limited supply of land in LA, and what a great example of the power of good design!

by 58-12 Design Lab
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you, 58-12 Design Lab!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

What is 58-12 Design Lab?

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

I want this at my parent

by jamie.kennedy.397
over 1 year ago | Reply

If we get this LA2050 grant, we'll be able to make it a reality!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

I know this would be so cool

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

I love the flexibility of the design that provokes us to consider and appreciate LA

by diane.favro
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

What is your favorite? I love the flexible skin.

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

It's fantastic!

by MonicaRaymond
over 1 year ago | Reply

I love the flexibility of the design that provokes us to consider and appreciate LA

by diane.favro
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

What would the one in your backyard look like?

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Can't wait to vote for this, by far the best conceptualized project! A full mock up of a BYH would be incredible.

by amimarie
over 1 year ago | Reply

Same here.

by ameliad
over 1 year ago | Reply

The combination of veteran Los Angeles institutions UCLA AUD + Daly Genik + Hammer Museum makes for a rock solid submission. Good luck! You have my vote.

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

Many thanks! We're excited to partner with LA2050!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

Can

by amimarie
over 1 year ago | Reply

The answer to this question is most likely: YES!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

It's absolutely possible.

by drewpbaldwin
over 1 year ago | Reply

hahaha

by ameliad
over 1 year ago | Reply

Looks really great! I look forward to seeing the prototype.

by buresh
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks -- we do too!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

this is dope. great idea guys.

by fraudfix
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks!

by cityLAB-UCLA
over 1 year ago | Reply

This is the kind of idea we've all been waiting for.

by ameliad
over 1 year ago | Reply

Pink-ribbon-award-box-icon
Award_topvotedidea
$1,000,000 in total grants
Circle-1-inactive Step1-title-submission-inactive

Submission Began
Tuesday, February 26

Submission Ended
Thursday, March 28
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-2-inactive Step2-title-voting-inactive

Voting Began
Tuesday, April 02

Voting Ended
Wednesday, April 17
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-3 Step3-title
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address

Winner Announced
Wednesday, May 08

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