START SEEING UGLY! A social app to reveal and transform blighted parts of Los Angeles

submission by urban applications

Organization Name

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Materials & Applications

Website

:

http://urbanapplications.org/

Indicator

Please select the one indicator that is most relevant to your project or organization: Social Connectedness

What is your idea and how will it impact your indicator?

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START SEEING UGLY! is proposed as a riveting demonstration of how emerging personal technologies and social media can—and most definitely will—become empowering tools for educating, engaging, connecting and organizing those living in community. The result will be a new twist on social connectedness, collective civic action and community empowerment where smartphones are put to use as instruments of social synergy.




Materials & Applications (M&A), a 501(c)(3) corporation, proposes to create a set of online social outreach tools under its Urban Applications initiative for just such purposes. START SEEING UGLY! will empower anyone with a Smartphone or digital camera to take photos of physical blight in any community in Los Angeles and upload them to a correlated website database that will “pin” the geotagged shots onto a map - creating a hub for social action by community stakeholders. START SEEING UGLY! will both promote and support social connectedness for civic engagement in a breathtaking display of participatory democracy.




M&A, as a group of online media developers, artists, architects, ecologists, urban planning students and other volunteers working in artistic fields, is interested in recruiting ordinary citizens in a sustainable campaign to clean up L.A. streets using processes of co-creation. By moving the participating public—especially young people—through a contiguous series of personal and collective commitments, we feel that we can help to transform our city—and our people—in positive ways for the future. Borrowing from an architectural concept, “urban acupuncture,” in which strategic small scale interventions have radiating effects, we expect to reset the power and energies of local distressed communities, one by one.




Building on prior experience in organizing communities to create public art that galvanizes public interest for environmental solutions, we will identify parcels of land that deteriorate the environmental, social and economic health of neighborhoods. Citizens will be invited to document these parcels and add them to the START SEEING UGLY! website-hosted database and mapping system. M&A will then work with community stakeholders to find solutions that are supported by the collective will and resource bank.




The first step, CONNECTION, is to encourage local citizens to see—really see—the decayed areas that they pass through each day and often ignore. We expect this project and its promotion will pull community stakeholders out of their complacency and into awareness. By having a platform on which to share what they see, participants will have stepped into a first level of personal responsibility for their community.




The second step, ANALYSIS, is for M&A and community partners to analyze the sites identified, using matrices that will track the greatest concentrations of photos and reportings, compare and sort them, amass demographic and land parcel data from city and other databases, and, with community input, prioritize them for action based on public interest and urgency.




The third step, TRANSFORMATION, is for M&A and its volunteers to connect to the sources of power who can investigate and negotiate solutions—City Council, City Planning and Cultural Affairs Departments, other governmental agencies, community organizations, and the private sector. In addition to spurring others to action, M&A will be alert for projects that deal with watershed and other environmental issues that could have a public art component. M&A supports the efficacy of working with community residents to plan and erect monuments to their successes in community engagement.




For example, M&A is now developing a public art element for a project in Sun Valley spearheaded by the Council for Watershed Health (CWH). CWH’s Elmer Avenue Neighborhood Retrofit Project transformed an under-served urban neighborhood into a urban ecosystem. Phase I of the project employed ecological strategies as well as community-engaged design to transform traditional front yards and a residential street into a system for water harvesting and conserving; climate appropriate landscaping; and recapturing stormwater to replenish groundwater supplies in the Los Angeles River Watershed. In Phase II, residents were engaged in the transformation of a blighted alleyway into a new Paseo, a community pathway integrated with stormwater management improvements.




M&A is working with CWH to expand on these efforts by engaging residents, schools and other community stakeholders to explore and interact with the new ecosystem through public art, environmental education, and community engagement. In so doing we are creating a model for building social cohesion and public art around community issues.




Our video is the vision of START SEEING UGLY! as a citywide strategy to promote social connectedness and civic action in Los Angeles.

What are some of your organization’s most important achievements to date?

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Materials & Applications (M&A), shares and demystifying concepts in art, architecture, and sustainable design in an outdoor courtyard open to the street 24 hours a day. Our projects create collaborative opportunities across disciplines and to explore new projects in public space. Our primary goal is the advancement of public participation in the built environment by inspiring visitors in their surroundings - while they explore the latest ideas in architectural design and theory on an experiential level. We push the application of materials beyond the limits of typical commercial, residential, and traditional gallery-based projects, towards more flourishing environments.




For ten years, M&A has transformed a parking lot in Silver Lake into an internationally-acclaimed center for materials research and artistic expression on an architectural scale exhibiting large-scale installations. M&A projects at this site are designed by artists and architects and built with volunteers from the community - winning three American Institute of Architects (AIA) awards, as well as other design awards and recognitions. M&A produced the inaugural performance for The Getty’s Pacific Standard Time with Judy Chicago - coordinating hands-on workshops for the public alongside the legendary artist to create an environment out of 25 tons of dry ice. The founder, Jenna Didier received the Neutra Spirit award 2010 and the Silver Lake History Collective award in 2011 for a lasting contribution to the cultural fabric of the Silver Lake district.




While M&A has been committed to working with “sustainable” materials and environments long before the term was popular, projects that have specifically sought to bring public attention to environmental and sustainability issues include a pneumatically-operated origami robotic garden by Eddy Sykes and the community-designed Taco Garden which explored sustainable gardening techniques in an aquaponics garden that re-circulated rainwater for growing tilapia and other fish taco ingredients—onions, cilantro and tomatoes.




Via a series of hands-on bilingual workshops commissioned by the Los Angeles Environmental Affairs Department, M&A managed the successful transformation of another blighted parking lot into a rainwater capturing surface with edible perimeter plantings tended by grateful mixed- use building residents and employees. Some benefits were: decreases in stormwater runoff from the parking lot, decreases in heat island effect, increases in social engagement between building residents and employees working downstairs. Prior to our work, then had not even been introduced.




Under its latest Urban Applications initiative which includes START SEEING UGLY!, M&A seeks to expand its activity into the larger Los Angeles area. Urban Applications is currently a finalist for an $350k ArtPlace grant from the NEA for the public art component of the Paseo and further development of its program.

Please identify any partners or collaborators who will work with you on this project.

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The following partners have already expressed an interest in assisting the effort to create the app, outreach campaign, and eventual site transformations:

The Council for Watershed Health (CWH) - project design, development of the website and database, and evaluation.

Councilman Eric Garcetti’s Office - shared goals: community engagement, urban acupuncture, and the streamlining of the app to be a contributor to the new L.A. Open Source Database currently in development by the City.

The L.A. Dept. of Cultural Affairs is enthusiastic about our outreach goals and the apps ability to identify those Council Districts whose constituents seek transformative art projects.

We are in communication with LACommons who would be an outreach partner.

Please explain how you will evaluate your project. How will you measure success?

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START SEEING UGLY! is about sensitizing the public to be aware of their environment so that they can be agents of social change as volunteers and civic participants.




It is also about empowering all citizens—including those suffering from isolation and disenfranchisement—to accept their responsibility and the opportunity to facilitate change with their neighbors. Citizens living in underserved communities DO have the power to initiate improvements in their communities that will positively affect their families. As budget cuts deepen, it is contingent upon them to step into this power, which will deepen their “ownership” in the local community, empower them, and lessen their social isolation.




As a test group under LA2050, M&A and CWH will work with middle school students near the Elmer Avenue Neighborhood Retrofit Project whose teachers have already expressed interest to use the START SEEING UGLY tools. Success will be measured by how many of these youth and their families/ networks are using the app and website. We will measure:




-Use of the START SEEING UGLY! tools.


-Data: site traffic, the quantity of photo uploads, the number of districts with photo submissions, the quantity of user’s comments, and others.


-Participation: tracking participants who use the online tools to see if they also become active in participating in hands-on workshops to envision and create new uses for sites they have helped to identify.




As the program develops, we will track workshop attendance, the quantity of workshop attendees who used the app, the quantity of workshop attendees who were introduced to the project through the “START SEEING UGLY” campaign, the number of successful projects completed, workshop attendees’ feelings about their participation.
With the help of our project partner, the Council for Watershed Health, we will also be able to track environmental impacts such as stormwater infiltration rates to sites that get a full retrofit.




As part of M&A’s Urban Applications initiative, it is clearly the intent of the project partners to grow the project into a sustainable citywide system. Thus, it will be important to know if people becoming engaged with the online tools are also becoming active in their communities. To this end, as the tools are perfected under this grant, the project team will recruit agencies and CBOs working throughout the city to generate public participation in neighborhoods throughout the city.

How will your project benefit Los Angeles? Please be specific.

The Ugly App is a tool for an ongoing program to benefit LA impacting the way the City solves problems.

First, a step beyond the Neighborhood Council system, it will provide involvement of all interested citizens--even those not currently empowered to initiate change in their communities. By inviting L.A.’s citizens to assist in mapping epidemic, interstitial or “left over” sites that are eroding the fabric of the City, the START SEEING UGLY! campaign will challenge Angelenos to engage in finding solutions. It is expected that many participating citizens will be making their first step into community involvement and a sense of ownership in their neighborhood’s surroundings. If they later engage in community meetings to advocate for site remediation and/or to participate in developing public art for public awareness, an informed and engaged citizenry is in the making for Los Angeles.

One significant impact could be the engagement of at-risk youth, in activity that guides them away from destructive acts and empowers them to be creative activists and stewards of their environment. This project will allow people who may have a history of disenfranchisement to engage with those that have the power to make change. By giving people a voice that is acknowledged and part of a larger effort to transform sites they helped select, trust will develop and encourage further volunteerism and stewardship

Second, the resulting open source database and mapping system will be available to everyone as well as to Los Angeles organizations and agencies in both the public and private sectors, from community farmers to artists to urban planners and financial investors, to be used in the development of intervention strategies for L.A. communities.


Finally, START SEEING UGLY!, by design, systematically identifies parcels that denigrate the environmental, social, and economic health of L.A. neighborhoods and provides the model process that can transform them through positive social and environmental change. After generating interest and support in the transformation of “ugly” sites, M&A will work with Council Districts, the Council for Watershed Health and organizations already connected to communities where identified sites are located to embed each place with significance. In partnership with local stakeholders and citizens, landmark works of public art that inspire residents to take pride in their neighborhoods and become creatively engaged in their surroundings will be created and installed. It is expected that this effort will lead to widespread community pride, less graffiti, more vibrant places to walk and play, more activity in common areas of the neighborhood, and, thus, greater public safety.


This project will also leave behind a methodology and tool for collaborative investment by all stakeholders, especially underserved citizens, in improving the social and physical infrastructures of Los Angeles.

What would success look like in the year 2050 regarding your indicator?

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Angelenos of 2050 are world leaders in the global movement towards increasing the livability of cities. The first generation born out of radically improved networks of communication and access to information, they have redefined the traditional relationship between individuals and civic organizations.




Residents are confident and connected—imbued with a sense of ownership in the future of their city. City institutions are agile bodies, reflexively contouring their expertise to nurture life and the needs of the people they serve. Unprecedented in their ability to listen to and acknowledge the daily experience of their citizens, they have constructed an infrastructure of communication and understanding that permeates relationships across sectors.




“Ugly” places are seen as opportunities to build something beautiful. Neighborhoods are no longer alienating places, but have become deeply personal with the histories of engagement reflected in a vital cityscape. Children feel deep belonging to their community and the built environments that sustain them.




In 2050, the LA River is a revitalized water system because residents understand the benefits of an EDA secured water supply, additional open park space, and a diversified ecosystem. They have effectively manifested their collective expectations in communications with both government and non-profit organizations, and those organizations set up effective two-way channels of communication. Across interest groups, common ground helps define shared points of entry into large scale, dynamic, meaningful projects that transform blight into assets. Artists and ecologists collaborate to install art on sites that have been retrofitted to recharge the groundwater and produce clean free energy.




These same technologies dismantled barriers to high art, quality education and a sense of co-ownership in the fruits of our culture. All community members have the opportunity to work with and become artists, architects, and designers -- developing the embodiment of the city’s cultural future, bringing landmark art out into the streets. Students in South L.A. can access maps of environmental hazards and see how they relate to crime, obesity rates and job opportunities. Using the same tools, they can convey their experience to City Council members and join urban gardening and public art groups working to make a difference. There is open dialogue around civic priorities and more defined and community-centric policy.



How do we get there? It starts with universal access to intelligible information and pathways for action. This new found fluidity will transform the people’s ability to understand their environment—to diagnose their needs and synthesize community values and political will into effective action. This will engender a system in which people can find their own voice and trust that it is heard by public officials. People will connect to one another and their surroundings

Discussion
83 Pink-talk-bubble-tail

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Great combo of tech and planning!

by taipan85
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks - once we do those things - the tech and the planning - then its time to build something beautiful and get our hands dirty!

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

How do I vote for M&A?

by rameses.sorrell
over 1 year ago | Reply

Hi Ramses - See that big blue button at the top of this page that maybe says something like "Vote for this Idea"? Please hit that button and then check your email and confirm your vote. Sorry the process is so glitchy!! Thank you so much !!!!

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

This project touches on so many of the LA2050 categories. From environmental quality, community health and public safety to education, arts and cultural vitality, the Ugly App has the potential to transform communities through social connectedness. This is the type of multi-benefit endeavor that can truly have a significant impact.

by joshua.link.79
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks for your comment. Resources are so scarce (as evidenced by the overwhelming response to this competition - including government-funded entities such as the Department of Cultural Affairs and the Natural History Museum). Due to the scarcity, we can no longer afford, as individuals or acting in collaboration with our neighbors to address only one problem with these resources. We need to find solutions that provide multiple benefits - the UGLYApp and the Urban Applications program that it will support is that kind of solution.

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

This is really cool. I was literally thinking yesterday as I walked by a trash-filled lot near my house... who is going to clean that up and put it to good use? Should I? How would I even go about it? And because I didn

by jonny.leahan
over 1 year ago | Reply

there is so much opportunity around us. it will be incredible when people start seeing the potential realized in those spaces.

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks - we actually already have a GIS map of all the vacant sites within a certain radius in LA - it shows lot size and how they are zoned. We realized a couple years ago when we first commissioned this map that it is only useful if we go around and LOOK at the lots. It is compatible with google maps, but the images on google maps are not always fresh..... So that's when we realized the problem is the solution - get the people who know their neighborhoods the best - the people who live there - to upload photos to the GIS map. We will find not only empty lots ready for a transformation, but also, those same people will be more inclined to jump in and help make the change that they envision.

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

The tragedy of the commons!

by kevininmotion
over 1 year ago | Reply

The tragedy of the commons!

by kevininmotion
over 1 year ago | Reply

See the director's cut of the video: http://youtu.be/xMZe396ANiQ

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

So cool! Great work.

by kevininmotion
over 1 year ago | Reply

Materials and Applications has a history of pulling off challenging projects with broad reach. They are the perfect group to spearhead this idea.

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you - after a decade of successful projects, its time to identify places where the work we do can have the greatest positive impact across multiple sectors.

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

Dude,You are so awesome! The only Idea you've had that was better than this was deciding to marrying me!

by guruom
over 1 year ago | Reply

:)

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

Talk about social connectedness!

by kevininmotion
over 1 year ago | Reply

Creating a community wide and virtual public forum to identify and chart solutions to blight in LA is a keen idea. Accessible new tools can empower communities to address areas of concern to them, and M&A has a recognized track record of creating compelling and innovative architecture in a public space. This is an compelling proposal.

by edward.cella.1
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you for your comment - When we started doing projects ten years ago we were astonished to discover that the real potential of our work resides in the collaborative spirit that by necessity relies on people from the surrounding community to come assist with all aspects of each new work. We look forward to working with communities across LA.

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

I would love to see a project like this in brooklyn.

by liana.hypatia
over 1 year ago | Reply

We would love to collaborate with groups in Brooklyn to map potential sites, discover opportunities for environmental improvements, greening, stormwater infiltration and community-engaged public art!

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

brooklyn is another great location for this project

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

Its a funny coincidence that a Brooklyn-based group is in this competition with a similar idea, but it stops at mapping - and it is not a socially-engaged project as ours is - it merely identifies sites where something "could" happen. We could have done that two years ago with a KMZ-enabled map that we commissioned. It loads onto google earth and shows where all the vacant lots are and how they are zoned. That is only marginally helpful b/c it does not indicate what sites are ripe and strategic from the viewpoint of someone living in the neighborhood- as our UGLYApp will.

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

This is a great project with potential for illuminating not only blight and opportunities for improvement, but also underlying community support for transforming those specific locations. I hope this moves forward.

by nriley
over 1 year ago | Reply

We hope so too! Thank you!

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

there is so much local support when discussing these ideas. M+A will make this project a great success if given the opportunity.

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

Fabulous idea to engage all who live in a community to really take notice of their surroundings. How often do we walk past the same sights day after day and barely take notice. Small changes and improvements can have huge impacts on reducing crime, building community, restoring nature, and increasing civic pride. What a great use of smartphone technology.

by torie.arthofer
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks! We have been inspired by so many different models of success in fighting crime, pollution, health, and apathy through beautification projects. We hope to augment the triple bottom line with each transformative project. The triple bottom line is: social justice, environmental sustainability, and economic growth.

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

is triple bottom line an international standard? how do you measure success?

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

We hope that the triple bottom line becomes an international standard - what an effective way to approach each new endeavor! We can no longer afford to spend precious resources to solve just one problem at a time - solutions must address and solve multiple challenges.

by urban applications
over 1 year ago

An extremely relevant tool and objective in a city comprised of the most publicly owned vacant lots in the nation. Social outreach should create a strong grass roots contingency to implement change at both the private and public sector.

by nuttree805
over 1 year ago | Reply

it would be amazing to see this working through both private and public initiatives. does LA really have the most publicly owned vacant lots?

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks - yes we see this as being a great tool across many sectors!

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

LA defines this project; it's a no brainer!

by eyeteach_2000@yahoo.com
over 1 year ago | Reply

thank you! you are right, it is a perfect fit for our city.

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

If it can work here it will work anywhere :)

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

This can be a stellar project for teachers/schools to use in classrooms and after-school programs to teach any number of subjects and help students continue Service Learning opportunities--despite federal funding cuts. It has great potential to engage new immigrants and others who lack access to the "systems" to input and organize in local neighborhoods. The fact that it is tied to environmental remediation, civic engagement, and artistic expression in the same breath is genius-- the development of public art which will include events in local neighborhoods is a masterful way of creating community and socially connecting people into their community for co-creative work and fun. I see young people setting up networks to work on this and engaging their families, clubs, etc. Love it!!

by raeamey
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank for your excellent comment - and for seeing the greater implications and applications of this App. We are excited to partner with the LAUSD and the City Council to maximize the usefulness and impacts of this tool.

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

I love Jen

by kingmillerus
over 1 year ago | Reply

love to you to king miller

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

We love Jen too

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

thank you kevin

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

Identifying the effects of blight is a difficult task. It seems crowdsourcing a search and discovery of blight is a great use of smart phone technology.

I hope this project gets funded, LA is a perfect place for this!

by Kmart_community
over 1 year ago | Reply

Yes! Localized LA blight info is as evasive as blight is prevalent!

by kevininmotion
over 1 year ago | Reply

I second that! LA is the perfect place for a project like this to flourish. I hope this one gets funded so I can take part in this!

by Rachelblindt
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you! Please promote this to your community - we are looking for community collaborators as we launch this exciting new program.

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

http://helsinkiacupuncture.blogspot.com/
Another huge influence on our Urban Applications program: Marco Casagrande, a Finnish architect who coined the term, "Urban Acupunture".

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

Nicholas de Monchaux - Local Codes

An amazing 5 minute overview of the externalities of blight:
http://nicholas.demonchaux.com/Work/local-code

by kevininmotion
over 1 year ago | Reply

agreed. so interesting!

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

Demonchaux's research uncovered that if you take all the vacant sites all over SF that are too small to develop (turn into a store or a house, etc) and transform them into greenspace, then you have a square acreage as large as Golden Gate Park!! The positive environmental impact upon the city of transforming this much acreage would decrease air and stormwater pollution and increase the health of everyone in the city.

We looked at that research and thought - ok - now how do we mobilize a city this big to make that BIG of a transformation?? It has to come from the talent the vision and the resourcefulness of each of the communities that has the highest amount of blight - we know how to get people involved - build a project that has lasting meaning and beauty for everyone - and when we go in to build it - start by partnering with a group like the Council for Watershed Health that knows how to make the greatest positive environmental impact and has been studying and perfecting their methods for twenty years!

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

This project is so smart. The best way to effect change is to inspire and engage the community to become authors of that change through active participation rather than just spectatorship. What better way to do that than to utilize online social networking, through which the potential of spreading awareness is exponential.

by lia0076@gmail.com
over 1 year ago | Reply

Active participation is the key - starting to actively notice is the first step

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you! We found that the strongest component of our constructions is the sharing of knowledge that happens in both directions from the design team to the volunteer participants who help us build. Everyone learns something - and everyone can be proud of their work in creating the finished project. We hope that future participants will get involved first by using the app to show us the places in need of the most help - and then by getting their hands dirty with us in making the change they help envision!

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

You are all amazing.

by ehurrle
over 1 year ago | Reply

thank you!

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

RIght back atcha!!! We are going to get this going and transform the city - and other cities - together.

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

"And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom."
Anais Nin

Here is to this idea & LA blossoming!

by tcgarber
over 1 year ago | Reply

thank you teresa! i love this imagery - it is an amazing thing to see a bright flower rise from cracks in concrete.

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

Perfect imagery!! What a beautiful quote - and so true - !

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

What an amazing project. I have seen work that M&A has done in the past, I'm always blown away and inspired by their innovative thinking at thoughtfulness to the environment they create in.

by lisasied
over 1 year ago | Reply

thank you lisa! this means a lot coming from a women with such creativity and attention to detail.

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you - we are so excited to take what we do best and join others across LA in uncovering new places as opportunities to make positive environmental, social, and economic impacts. This mapping app is the first step!

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

LA is precisely the right city for this project. Really hoping it gets to happen!

by giantmech
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thanks- we sure hope it gets to happen too!

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

Driving thru the heart of LA we noticed an endless homage to blind growth and consumerism in a decaying infrastructure under a perfect sky. The effect on the occupying humanity must be devastating. How do you reinstall nature into this setting and refocus the population on the simple, most important aspects of our mutual existence. Peace love and understanding.

by Matt l.
over 1 year ago | Reply

Beautiful! This is just the shift we hope to create!

by kevininmotion
over 1 year ago | Reply

Beautiful! This is just the shift we hope to create!

by kevininmotion
over 1 year ago | Reply

Exactly! Nature must be reintroduced into our cities as an artform that needs to be studied, nurtured and craved.

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

Sign me up!!! This is exactly the type of project I would love to be involved in. I envision school groups, community service groups, church groups, and many other types of collectives would benefit from working on Seeing Ugly Projects. "Start and finish" projects tend to be more enjoyable and inspiring for volunteers, and each beautification project will be permanent installments that will benefit the community for years to come. Studies have proven that people tend to respect beautiful well kept areas and will trash deprecated areas. Living in a beautiful environment will add a great amount of pleasure to peoples lives.

by Sandy.SabnSandy
over 1 year ago | Reply

Teaming up a diverse group of community members is key! And yes, there are so many benefits to accounting for those blighted spaces in our midst. This amazing Penn study found a large decrease in gun violence among other things.

by kevininmotion
over 1 year ago | Reply

Its amazing how many indicators this cuts across - our obvious indicator is Arts & Culture, but in order to make an impact in this sector, one must take Social Connectedness to a new level. The input of the intended audience, the participation of those who will live with and tend for the surrounding environment is critical for the health of the arts, the environment, and ultimately, the sustainability of our communities economically.

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

I look forward to seeing this in action! It is a compelling idea by a group with the expertise to make it work.

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

I agree! If you compare at the stretch of Silver Lake Blvd where M&A is now, and compare it to 10 years ago, there's been an amazing trasformation.

by kevininmotion
over 1 year ago | Reply

I agree! If you compare at the stretch of Silver Lake Blvd where M&A is now, and compare it to 10 years ago, there's been an amazing trasformation.

by kevininmotion
over 1 year ago | Reply

getting the community involved in the art projects makes them aware of their surroundings. good thinking!

by ramsdale
over 1 year ago | Reply

Exactly! We sometimes joke that its like urban gardening for people who don't have green thumbs... although there is room for urban gardening, forestry, and greening projects in this program - its all about identifying sites and coordinating with stakeholders.
Thanks for the comment - lets make this happen!

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

thanks ramsdale. i appreciate your comment - you have a unique perspective on the city.

by jensilbert
over 1 year ago | Reply

What a great idea! Rallying the community around something happening in its midst sounds like a great way to ensure this is permanent change - not just a temporary band-aid.

by ErinBullivant
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you - you have struck on the core of this project: a permanent solution that can grow and change with a community - inspiring and instructing from a stance that we are all capable of changing the world around us for the better - that each person's perspective is valued.

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

This is a fabulous initiative! It will save time on all of that paper work that often has to happen before a project takes place in a community because it has to be approved by a council or board and funded. This is about empowering communities, working together to make a difference. When people see people taking action I think it often encourages more positive action because people see that they can make a difference to improve lives and communities.I could easily see this translating to other cities across the world. Would love to see it in London!

by ljmolyneaux
over 1 year ago | Reply

Thank you! Would love to collaborate with groups there. SO much local talent and resources. Lets go London!

by urban applications
over 1 year ago | Reply

It

by Kmart_community
over 1 year ago | Reply

Pink-ribbon-award-box-icon
Award_topvotedidea
$1,000,000 in total grants
Circle-1-inactive Step1-title-submission-inactive

Submission Began
Tuesday, February 26

Submission Ended
Thursday, March 28
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-2-inactive Step2-title-voting-inactive

Voting Began
Tuesday, April 02

Voting Ended
Wednesday, April 17
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-3 Step3-title
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address

Winner Announced
Wednesday, May 08

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