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The Caine's Arcade Challenge
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We envision a city in which creativity is a core social value and a critical skill developed in every child; where the innate passion, curiosity and creativity of children is nurtured in schools, homes and communities everywhere; where all children are taught to be creative thinkers and doers, and encouraged to make their very best ideas happen in the world. The Caine’s Arcade Challenge will celebrate and develop the creativity and social entrepreneurship of children on a grand scale throughout the Southland. The Challenge will also showcase the role adults can play in fostering these traits. Specifically, the Challenge will engage 10,000 children, 500 teachers, 100 schools, building over 100 cardboard arcades, and raising over $25,000 for local charitable causes. Student participants will become more creative, more entrepreneurial and more empathetic. Teacher participants will become more proficient at project-based learning and more networked to each other locally and globally. Other adult participants who attend events on the Day of Play will learn about the simple things they can do to foster creativity in children. The scale of the event will raise public awareness about the value of creativity. Over the course of the Challenge, project-based learning and social entrepreneurship will proliferate throughout the city. A website designed for the Challenge will capture content from the various participants: photos, videos, lesson plans, activity kits, blogs and other content will showcase the ingenuity of students and their teachers, and become sources for inspiration and the mass proliferation of project-based learning beyond the scope of the Challenge itself.

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Empowering Teens with the Knowledge and Skills to Make Healthy Decisions
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Many LAUSD schools are opting to forego the traditional 9th grade semester-long health class, instead absorbing the minimum mandated CA Education Code HIV/AIDS prevention education into advisory or science classes. Our program is a free service to schools, and includes not only HIV/AIDS prevention and awareness education, but also education on a number of topics that have the potential to impact high school graduation rates, public safety (such as sexual assault and intimate partner violence), and the overall health and wellness of low-income communities in LA. We also increase civic participation and social connectedness in LA County by engaging college students in the communities beyond their campuses.

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Many major cities have flourishing public art programs that help define the urban landscape and build awareness of contemporary art and culture, yet Los Angeles is lacking in this arena. Through L.A.P.D., LAXART is filling this gap by bringing art to the streets, and inspiring residents to engage with the work. Public artworks can change misconceptions about contemporary art and grow new and diverse audiences, as the art experience changes from a static gallery visit to an organic encounter that is meaningful and inspires dialogue. We are developing a larger audience for the arts in L.A. outside the traditional viewing context, and with repeated exposure, a public that feels ownership of and embraces artwork that emerges locally. L.A.P.D. benefits Los Angeles artists and audiences. The program gives working artists the opportunity to experiment with new methods and media and to consider their work as part of their home environment. Such projects will help L.A. to sustain its position as a hub for art and culture, and allow us to train and retain the next generation of visual artists, knowing that there are possibilities for their creative practice that await beyond the norm. The LA2050 public projects, including two sculptural installations, five billboards, and a painted building façade are part of an ongoing effort to enhance open spaces. Commissions will add to the character of the city, and we hope that local residents will more readily welcome art in their lives with increased exposure in the public sphere. The city will enjoy a larger audience for contemporary art, as the expansion of L.A.P.D will prepare residents to receive the extensive body of work that LAXART will present in The Occasional in 2015.

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Upcycle Innovation
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In 2013 our project will benefit Angelenos by providing a full service center for hand-on arts. Our goal is to open the project in the Fall and serve 700 people a month. Additionally, we will save an anticipated 3 tons of reusable materials from the landfill. As the project grows in the coming years these numbers will grow. ReDiscover Center programs benefit the youth of Los Angeles by providing art-based instruction at a time when school funding cuts have all but eliminated arts education. The programs are designed to promote collaboration, community stewardship, and critical thinking skills. Our Upcycle Innovation project will expand these programs. The Los Angeles Almanac projects by 2050 the population of our city will be 11,434,565. The impact of such a population boom on the volume of waste without dedicated space and resources to curb behavior cannot currently be measured. By creating a space dedicated to engagement through full-scale arts and tinkering programs, and triangulation with community organizations and leaders, we can realistically reach our goal of an entire generation of Angelenos growing up with the not just the understanding the concept of repurposing, but actually having taken an active part in the process.

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Paper Free Studio
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- About 1/4 of the 37 schools in Boyle Heights of an API of less than 5 will raise their API by 1 or 2 points yearly. - About 1/4 of the 9 schools with an API of 1 will move up 3 points by 2017 - The Paper Free Studio will transform education by showing 200 education stakeholders of Boyle Heights how to do more blended-learning & digital project based learning when teaching and mastering content. Thus, increasing the attendance rates at Roosevelt HS and feeder schools. - The project will teach educators and their scholars how to code, use GIS maps, and expose students to more digital resources to access higher education. - All schools will have at least one paper free classroom. - More digital classrooms in LA will support the 21st century student by giving them the skills to collaborate & think critically, thus, researching information more thoughtfully. - Create a professional learning network of 200 teachers and thousands of students.

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Increase Voter Turnout, Neighbor to Neighbor Communication and Gov't Responsiveness
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<p>First, citizens will have a useful tool through which they can communicate easily & clearly with their neighbors, & understand one another’s concerns, eliminating some of the disconnectedness that can characterize city life in LA. While online social media exist, as do online petition tools, the key to this project is combining the tools & organizing them to focus on a specific public goal in order to make use of their potential for improving quality of life & for creating a sense of community.</p> <p>The current system of Neighborhood Councils in the city is a great idea and plays a vital role, but is not always easy for all citizens to access since meetings are held at specific times & places when not everyone is available. Using the online tools improves accessibility.</p> <p>Secondly, city officials will have access to a means for understanding public concerns and ideas & will be able to improve responsiveness.</p> <p>Third, voter turnout will increase. City residents will have a stake in the local elections since they can play a role in bringing issues to the ballot or informing candidate positions.</p> <p>Fourth, as residents know their voices are being heard, & are able to witness their own impact, barriers to collective action will be reduced and other civic benefits will accrue such as increased levels of volunteerism and community participation.</p> Finally, public policy will be improved in the sense that it will be more responsive to public needs.Only time will tell what specific policy initiatives and legislation will ensue to improve the lives of Angelenos, but a historical example provides an illustration of the power of public communication.</p> <p>Forty years ago residents in an area of Niagara Falls, NY, experienced higher-than-normal rates of miscarriages, birth defects, cancer, and other illnesses. Families suffered in silence, their struggles known only to their physicians and to close family or friends. When one family mom told a town meeting of her concerns about the environment near her home, other families chimed in with similar stories of illnesses. As they shared, they realized they were not alone, & that the high incidence in their neighborhood of sickness could not be a coincidence, but must point to a larger problem. The neighborhood came to be known to the nation as Love Canal and before they were finished, a committed group of housewives gained national attention for their concerns and forced into being some of the most important environmental-protection legislation of the 20th Century. And it only happened once neighbors began to communicate & discover they were not the only ones with a particular set of concerns or experiences. If they had not talked to & heard one another, they might have simply continued to suffer in silence. In today's “town square,” the Internet, citizens can share, ideas, voice concerns, better understand one another, & ultimately organize for action outside of the town square.</p>

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Shared Housing Helps Los Angeles Become a National Model!
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LA’s future as a thriving metropolis relies on providing a housing supply that supports individual stability, keeps people connected to the places where they live, and makes communities more vibrant, diverse and supportive. Shared housing does this by capturing the inventory of available units, rather than relying solely on the production of new units. A staggering 73% of low-income homeowners and 93% of low-income renters spend more than 30% of their income on housing. By pursuing shared housing as a strategy to address affordability challenges, the project will close the gap between inadequate income and the high cost of housing. In 2012, individuals enrolled in ALA’s shared housing program reduced their rents costs by an average of 50%. Moreover, Los Angeles sets trends for the rest of the nation. With a strong shared housing program, we have the opportunity to become a national model for integration - rather than marginalization - of vulnerable populations.

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Visual Arts Education at Heart of Los Angeles
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Residing in the culturally rich, but economically struggling Rampart District, HOLA serves youth in one of the most densely populated areas in LA County, with over 75,000 residents within a 1.75-mile radius, 28% of which are under the age of 18. Latinos comprise the largest ethnic group in the community at 63% followed by Asian Americans at 26%. Of the families that HOLA serves, 90% are living at or below the poverty line and struggle each day to simply survive. As a result of these poverty levels and the dense and diverse population, this district is home to heavy violence, drug trafficking and over 30 active gangs that begin recruiting youth as young as 10 years of age. According to a LA Times report, during a recent 6-month period, 488 violent crimes were reported in HOLA’s neighborhood alone. This at-risk environment is compounded by severe school budget cuts that have resulted in fewer critical services being offered to families in dire need. Students are attending overcrowded and understaffed schools that are unable to provide the individual support each student needs to successfully pursue their education. Many schools’ arts education programs have been devastated by the state and local budgetary crisis and unfortunately, “most of this decline in access has been concentrated in schools serving low-income students, the very population that can benefit most from quality arts instruction.” The National Endowment for the Arts reports that arts education for Latino and African-American students has declined by over 40% in the last twenty years. HOLA provides a rigorous arts program for youth right in the center of this impoverished neighborhood. Access to arts education is a critical need for underserved students across LA. Engagement in the arts has proven to bolster academic achievement, supporting HOLA’s long-term aim to help all of its youth graduate high school and matriculate through college. As creative industries are the second largest business sector in LA, arts education is crucial in developing 21st century workforce skills. HOLA’s Visual Arts is not simply an arts education supplement, but a structured and immersive program offering rigorous instruction, cultural field trips, guest artist workshops, and a firm reach into the larger LA community. Through initiatives like the Public Art Project, HOLA’s students, leading LA artists and community members are connected in new and meaningful ways. The Visual Arts program is operating at capacity, with a lengthy waiting list, but carries the potential to impact even more than HOLA’s 2,500 at-risk youth and their families, and to activate and create dialogue in parts of the city previously lacking access to the arts.

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LA Street Vendors: A Better Economy through Low-Income Entrepreneurs
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Street vendors are already an iconic part of Los Angeles’ national reputation for culinary excellence and innovation, as well a daily part of city residents’ lives. In low-income communities, almost everyone has a neighbor, a friend, or a family member who at least supplements their family income with street vending. Although street vending as an occupation has existed for hundreds of years, it is often part of the underground economy, which means that it is a highly insecure line of work. Currently vendors are under constant threat from both the city and petty crime, which vendors cannot stop out of fear of police persecution. In addition, because vending is illegal, the city makes no tax or licensing revenue from it and pays fees for policing and storing confiscated equipment. Through partnerships with small business, vendors gain a powerful ally in exchange for helping to revive and adorn empty LA sidewalks in front of those businesses. The creation of a forum that brings formal and informal businesses together will strengthen both sectors through idea-sharing and collaboration. Vendors will increase the capacity of their businesses and be more effectively able to fill market niches by understanding the existing business landscape. In 2050, legalized vending will have moderate costs in the short-term from creating and enforcing new licensing, but will lead to tremendous long-term economic growth benefits. Entrepreneurs on the street operating will no longer fear legal repercussions and for the first time will be able to sustain and grow their businesses, invest more in equipment, and build meaningful relationships with small businesses. And, for those who wish, a legal system for street vendors will create an entrepreneurial pathway for them to grow into their own brick-and-mortar businesses in the City—businesses with a high likelihood of re-investing locally. Additionally, the whole City will benefit from new income from licensing and tariffs. Developing of a venture capital fund to support street vendors will allow the City to invest in its low-income entrepreneurs. The fund will provide capital for vendors to buy new products, certified equipment, hire staff, or even pay for permits. Financial support will not be provided as a loan, but as an investment, in exchange for a minority stake in the business and a commitment from the vendor to work with a “board member” or “advisor” to support the growth of the business over time. At an agreed upon point, the vendor will have the opportunity to “buy out” the minority stake sold; money that will be re-invested into the fund to support other entrepreneurs. Ultimately, support for vending has the potential to organically bring investment streams into the poorest areas and communities of LA. It will allow enterprising individuals to lift themselves up by their own bootstraps, creating their own jobs to provide for their families.

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Los Angeles Youth Orchestra Community Building
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Our project directly impacts the future of Los Angeles through our students. Our students directly impact the greater community through our concerts. LAYO students are proof that playing an instrument and participating in an ensemble positively affects academic success. 100% of our participants graduate high school and most go onto college. The Los Angeles Youth Orchestra positively impacts the community through our audience. People who attend our concerts can't help but share the joy and enthusiasm our musicians demonstrate while performing. This positively impacts the cultural vitality of our city through the participation and support of the arts.

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The power in an hour: Putting time for teachers back in a principal's day
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Across Los Angeles every morning, 750,000 students enter their classrooms. Each of these classrooms is led by a teacher. And each teacher should have a leader who can come into their classroom, observe their instruction and help them to grow so that those 750,000 students get the education that they need to be successful. Our LA2050 proposal will enable this to happen at a dramatically greater scale. This project will identify great ideas, develop them into tools that can be replicated, and test them for efficacy. Once they have been demonstrated to be effective they will be ready to be shared across the hundreds of schools that exist in LA. For example, a tool that saves a principal <b>an hour a day</b>, spread to schools across Los Angeles would translate to nearly a <b>225,000 hours of coaching and support</b> for teachers in their classrooms during each school year. By 2050 this would lead to over <b>8 million</b> additional hours spent developing effective educators in LA.

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The Pulse of Los Angeles: Assessing the Watersheds
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Today, we know that many Angelenos don’t have a strong connection to the systems they rely upon and have only a vague idea of the impact of climate change on their lives. The truth is that if we don’t figure out how to live with the environment and within our water constraints, Los Angeles will fail as a major city. In thinking about how to catalyze the necessary changes, the Council for Watershed Health looks to its organizational “Vision 2025.” We envision a future for LA with clean water, reliable local water supplies, ample parks and open spaces, revitalized rivers, and vibrant communities. Looking at our own experience and examples throughout the region, we believe the creation of a report card is the most effective way to describe the progress towards this vision for all Angelenos to make them believe it is possible, and then update them regularly on how things were going. In creating a clear and easily understood way to regularly inform Angelenos about the health of our environment, the Pulse of Los Angeles project will create the knowledge needed to embody ecological health, social equity, and economic vitality. By using water and watersheds as the organizing principle, the Pulse will reconnect people to their landscape and waterways. It will become one of the critical tools for changing how people imagine the city, pointing the way towards so many of the changes we now hold dear. We recognize that human well-being is intrinsically tied to clean air, access to clean water, parks, and natural open spaces, and healthful food. The services provided by healthy ecosystems are essential to healthy communities and healthy people. In developing a tool that measures, values, and tracks progress towards urban water resources sustainability for the Los Angeles area we will catalyze the changes that lead to a healthy environment and strong economy.

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Make one Healthy Choice... Then Make Another.
Make one Healthy Choice... Then Make Another.
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The city of Los Angeles is a salad bowl rich in food and culture. By exposing these mostly Hispanic/Latino youth to the many different cultures, healthy food options and physical activity, we will give them a hands-on learning experience that will allow healthier food choices and create greater cultural awareness. The goal is to create dialogue, not only with the participating youth, but with communities in other parts of Los Angeles, to help create better understanding and awareness of the differences and commonalities amongst Angelinos with a focus on healthy eating, food literacy, and physical activity. By exposing the youth to culture through healthy food options across the abundant landscape of Los Angeles, we will begin to create bonds and bridges between cultures and minority groups. A culture of health and fitness will be promoted in the Latino community that will reduce many of the health consequences of obesity we listed above. This reduces the public health risk that the Department of Public Health has identified about obesity. Thus, a healthier community actually is a less social service reliant community and can benefit all Angelenos in an unintended manner. Healthy eating can also be attributed in minimal studies as having other health benefits such as overall happiness, activeness, better school performance, and community participation. On a business perspective it is accepted that eating healthier also raises economic awareness and can benefit all of Los Angeles. By promoting health and creating discussion amongst the different sectors of greater Los Angeles, we are empowering Angeleno children for the rest of their lives.

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Building a Lifetime of Options and Opportunities for Men (BLOOM)
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Support for BLOOM benefits Los Angeles in three ways: 1. There is a growing movement in philanthropy to invest in a more focused way to address the challenges facing young Black men and boys. Along with The California Endowment’s Boys and Men of Color focus and The California Wellness Foundation’s Violence Prevention Initiative, BLOOM is an instrumental part of L.A.’s philanthropic efforts to address the disparities in outcomes for Black male youth. 2. Given Los Angeles often sets the pace for identifying solutions to challenges that impact our nation in general, lessons learned from Los Angeles can serve as a testing ground to address two of our nation’s most pressing needs: (1) cost effective alternatives in the face of fiscal constraints; and (2) the urgency to positively alter the trajectory of system-involved Black youth. 3. Lastly, there are more than 800,000 Blacks residing in Los Angeles County. We can ill afford to have a significant segment of this population (i.e., Black male youth) continue to underachieve and missing the opportunity to become self-sufficient, taxpaying citizens of our community. L.A.’s national and global competiveness is inextricably linked to these outcomes as we approach the year 2050.

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ESP Team Teacher Service Learning Project
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This project will: * increase academic achievement within Los Angeles * increase the Academic Performance Index of Low Performing Schools within Los Angeles * decrease the drop out rate in Los Angeles * provide a more meaningful educational experience to youth within Los Angeles * promote empathy within our Los Angeles community * create students who are socially conscious and active toward issues concerning our Los Angeles Communities. These results will directly impact Los Angeles because it will ignite a system where prople are socially engaged within their community and are addressing community needs which will positively impact our community.

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ENDLESS ORCHARD
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This project is uniquely tied to Los Angeles by history. Much of the land on which the city is built was once citrus orchards, most of them razed over the last century for building sites. Almost the only trace that remains is in old postcards of endless orchards with a backdrop of snow-covered mountains, the vigorous fruit contrasting against the icy peaks. These cards fed the utopian dream of California, a bountiful place where you could live in beauty and comfort. <p> Fallen Fruit’s work has often alluded to this past, a way of holding on to a utopian impulse in the middle of our urban grit. It comes with echoes of democracy, the idea of a just world in which everyone is treated equally and everyone’s needs are accounted for. <p> California has a complicated history, from its first colonization by Spanish missionaries to the rancho system, where land tracts were given to favored people as rewards, and then the Homestead Act, which tried to democratize things. One of the ideas of old West we respect was to take care of strangers and passersby — in a world without infrastructure, all people had was each other. <p> Los Angeles is now bursting with infrastructure, and a lot of it doesn’t work. We have less public green space per square mile than New York City. The idea of the commons was never particularly Californian, but it’s rooted in human culture: a space that’s shared by all, not just to look at but to graze our animals and raise our food. The commons weren’t about ownership (which was shared) but about use: who could use the land and the things it gives us.<p> Fallen Fruit’s public art projects have really arisen in the context of Los Angeles and its strange mix of density and neglect. The public agrarian experiments we propose are uniquely suited to our climate — not just the weather but also the culture. Fruit is a great tool for socially-minded artists because it never exists in isolation. Someone grows it (often in California), someone picks it (often an underpaid migrant worker), and others prepare it, serve it, and then consume it. Our work strives to connect all these relationships in surprising ways.<p> None of the fruit commonly eaten today is native to California, though much of it is grown here. We work with that fact, and see the way a bunch of fruit hanging over the sidewalk in Alhambra is also an invitation. It’s a symbol of bounty and generosity. It’s an invitation to a stranger, perhaps to you.

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Fandango Obon Project / Proyecto Fandango Obon
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While our neighborhoods in many ways provide comfortable, safe havens, and especially for immigrant populations, there should exist friendly avenues to enter and exit, and meaningful opportunities to engage across them. Great Leap continues its commitment to use the arts to bridge cultural boundaries. Over our 35 years we have developed methodologies to provide people of diverse ethnicities, religions and other self-identifications with opportunities for deep and meaningful encounters. Important elements of Fandango-Obon are providing a compelling purpose for people to come together, and the creation of an affirming space for exploration and expression without judgment. It is an entrance to a place in time where music, dance, and connection with one’s ancestral traditions can be lived with pride. Our theater techniques, games and other facilitation frameworks help participants bond with people of other backgrounds, often for the first time. Once such a “barrier” is unlocked, it can be more easily be opened in future encounters across the city. We practice assertive outreach to ensure that our gatherings are not only cross-cultural, but also intergenerational, so that young people can learn from elders who may have deeper understanding from direct experience with their cultural heritage. Geographical dimensions of L. A. will be utilized in unique ways. The L.A. River separates Boyle Heights and Little Tokyo. Though only a short walk across a bridge, residents of the respective neighborhoods generally do not interact, other than in passing. Fandango-Obon will give impetus to cross the “bridge” – on foot, bicycle or via the metro. A workshop at the Nishi Hongwanji Temple just west of the 1st St. Bridge, will welcome a mainly Latino community into a Japanese American setting. Conversely, residents of Little Tokyo will travel the short distance to Boyle Heights to be welcomed by our workshop partner Building Healthy Communities. Additional cross-cultural engagements include a workshop at A Place Called Home (APCH) in South Los Angeles, bringing Japanese Americans to a center with mainly African American and Latino youth. APCH is located only 3 miles south of Little Tokyo down Central Avenue, an historic cultural Mecca of its own. Fandango-Obon will elevate awareness of Angelenos’ common histories within geographic proximity. For example, how many of us knew that Boyle Heights has had established Japanese and Jewish communities in the recent past? Mutual understanding can lower cultural barriers and help us “create a circle dance” that respects our uniqueness while building trust and stronger community relations. We see the potential for this project to change stereotypical perceptions that separate us. As our city and nation continues moving toward people of color being the majority, we want L.A. to stand out as a place where arts and culture are robust and accessible to all and are used in innovative ways to meet our challenges.

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Sister Blocks
Sister Blocks
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It would, in simple hands-on fashion, create a connectivity in Los Angeles that would be felt everywhere and cost next to nothing.

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Changing the Course of the Alzheimer’s Epidemic in L.A. County:  Early Detection Counts Campaign
Changing the Course of the Alzheimer’s Epidemic in L.A. County: Early Detection Counts 12 Pink-talk-bubble-tail
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<p>Due to health care reform, there is an opportunity now for transformational change in medical care. This change provides a chance to alter the course of the Alzheimer’s epidemic; to change how people with cognitive impairment are viewed and treated; and to change the quality of life of the people who care for them. Intervention now can save our region millions of dollars in unnecessary costs for hospitalizations and nursing home care. It can remove a predictable threat to the solvency of our public health care system. </p> <p>Changing the course of the epidemic in L.A. County– Currently, the numbers of people with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias are poised to skyrocket. Among Latinos and Asians, the increases will be most dramatic. Yet, due to nihilism and lack of accurate information, health care providers are not recognizing the disease and do not diagnose or treat the great majority of cases. These individuals are doubly victimized by their conditions. They suffer the relentless loss of their minds, and are frequently misunderstood and mistreated, by their families and by health care providers. This project will dramatically increase the detection of dementing diseases by our region’s health care providers and result in improved treatment and care.</p> <p>Saving our health care system – Unrecognized cognitive impairment is expensive. It creates barriers to the management of co-morbid health conditions such as diabetes and cardio-vascular disease. It leads to poor management of the needs of the patient. It drives up expenditures for Medicare, MediCal and private insurance. Several research studies have demonstrated that better detection, treatment and care management can lead to lower expenditures for emergency room visits, hospital stays, and doctor visits. Better care and access to community supports may also reduce expensive and unnecessary stays in nursing homes. This level of care can cost $90,000 or more per year and is born by families and the MediCal program. Better managed care will reduce costs to the private and public health care systems resulting in economic benefit to the government, employers and individual households.</p> <p>Changing the lives of families - Early detection means that families and patients will gain access to better quality health care and supports. L.A.’s caregiving families will suffer less burden and depression. They will be better shielded from financial devastation because recognition of dementing conditions will help with their management and with the management of co-morbid conditions like diabetes and heart disease. Better understanding of cognitive impairment will allow families more opportunity to plan for the future and get appropriate care. This is turn will lead to reduced absenteeism both at work for adults and in school for children in households dealing with the overwhelming burden of caregiving. </p>

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AxS [ak-sis] Festival
AxS [ak-sis] Festival
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In 1984, the world came to Los Angeles. Mostly they came for the Summer Olympics, but many also experienced stunning performances by artists of international caliber during the Olympic Arts Festival; Robert Graham’s monumental Olympic Gateway sculptures still tower over Memorial Coliseum as a reminder of what a great festival can mean to a great city. In 1984, Los Angeles dismissed those Orwellian connotations and instead took its place among the great international art cities – a city of the future. This celebration of arts and culture was followed at three-year intervals thereafter through 1993 as the Los Angeles Festival, which continued the tradition of artistic innovation and excellence, introducing a little-known Canadian company called Cirque du Soleil alongside master artists like Peter Brook and local standouts like Lula Washington. Now, 20 years after the last Los Angeles Festival, the AxS [ak-sis] Festival brings to the Los Angeles area not just a dynamic public event but a bold challenge to cultural, business and civic leaders to engage with the art-science movement and allow Los Angeles to lay its claim as the movement’s energy center. Increasingly complex challenges of the 21st century will be best addressed by cross-sector dialogue and innovation. The art-science movement, with its multidisciplinary emphasis, will have a ripple effect through the region as it demonstrates what is possible when intellectual capital is harnessed. Several indicators of the quality of life in Los Angeles could be impacted by art and science coming together both as a festival and as a civic initiative. The quality of education in the Los Angeles area is dismal and getting worse every year. With its emphasis on STEM to STEAM, the educational components of the art-science movement will propose much-needed strategies to better leverage creative and innovative capital and invest it in the schools. Since STEM to STEAM is increasingly a part of the national dialogue on education, AxS will help attract federal funding to launch these programs in local schools. Creative endeavor has long been recognized to enhance learning and improve graduation rates, resulting in a better prepared workforce. The cultural vitality of the region is projected to decline over the next decades, the only indicator with this discouraging trend and caused by the lack of a coherent arts-nurturing policy. The AxS Festival would establish Los Angeles as the center of a vibrant new movement, one with the potential to catalyze resources and realize powerful outcomes. Taking a page from the High Line project in New York, creative teams would be tasked with creating alternative park spaces in under-resourced neighborhoods and communicating messages about healthy living. Putting cross-disciplinary programs like Art Center College of Design’s Designmatters at the forefront, sustainable solutions to environmental challenges will be developed which address scalable outcomes.

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Award_topvotedidea
$1,000,000 in total grants
Circle-1-inactive Step1-title-submission-inactive

Submission Began
Tuesday, February 26

Submission Ended
Thursday, March 28
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-2-inactive Step2-title-voting-inactive

Voting Began
Tuesday, April 02

Voting Ended
Wednesday, April 17
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-3 Step3-title
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address

Winner Announced
Wednesday, May 08

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