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Shall We Dance in LA?
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Our dance programming will benefit Los Angeles in many ways. -We will be programming to LAUSD schools that desperately need support. We are doing this at no cost to the LAUSD or to students; -Through our projects, we are enabling communities like Sylmar, San Fernando, Arleta, and Pacoima to diversify their community-based cultural events. Two such events, the Sylmar Health and Wellness Fair and the Sylmar Olive Festival are coming up, and we are already on board in terms of providing performances and other support. -The second aspect of our proposal creates a new dance/arts festival. While this first year will, at this point, be one day long, this is only the beginning. Our focus is creating events for our students to showcase themselves and connect with their peers, community members and leaders, and dance professionals. This winter's event will have a corresponding event at the end of the spring school semester. Summer students will also have their own culminating event. Alumni of our programming will be welcome to continue in our projects and events, creating a sustaining community/family. As a small, new organization, For Learners of All Ages is using these events to create and support more programming and public activities across the 10 communities we are pledged to serve: Sylmar, San Fernando, Pacoima, Lake View Terrace, Sunland, Tujunga, North Hills, Mission Hills, Panorama City, and Arleta. Our activities will also serve as a model for other parts of the San Fernando Valley, and the city and county of Los Angeles, creating sustainable, duplicatable programming with documented, peer-reviewed results that translate on school records, greater and broader cultural and business activity, and overall community value.

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Youth Outreach Unit "Together We Create a Better Y.O.U."
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Demographic experts tell us that if juvenile crime rates for persons 10 to 17 continue to increase with expected youth population increases, the year 2010 will see the number of juvenile-committed violent crimes increase by nearly 15 percent. However, these projections do not have to be America's destiny. Over the past two years, there has been a decline in the rates of both murders committed by youth and youth violence in general. While the juvenile violent crime arrest rate increased 62% between 1987 and 1993, it decreased 2.9% in 1995, the first decline in seven years. As the problem of juvenile violence has grown, so has our understanding of the problem and some possible solutions. A small percentage of youth are responsible for the bulk of violent juvenile crime; most violent crimes committed by youth are committed against other juveniles; and many involve handguns and/or drug use. Violence is a learned behavior and children neglected, left alone, or uncared for, without appropriate role models, often do not learn right from wrong. Children who suffer abuse at the hands of family violence often learn that violence is natural, even expected. The success of our V2K Community Development Program has been positively correlated with a multitude of public service assistance. Experts agree that the best predictors of successful transition are: an intensively supportive environment, counseling, mentoring, education, drug treatment, and opportunities for employment. A highly structure multidisciplinary case plan and customized youth services are unavoidably intertwined as a means to successfully engage youth and propel them towards a productive future. The unique program design and topic courses that we have created with the target population in mind (i.e. safety, date rape, gang abatement, self-esteem, childcare, health care, rape crisis counseling, youth support, anger management, violence awareness, mentoring, academic assistance, communication, etc.) will especially benefit minors who have a propensity to engage in criminal and delinquent behavior. Many experts agree that the way one thinks, leads to the way an individual behaves. Delinquency and youth crime affect not only the victims, but has a “domino effect” on the entire community regardless of the severity of the crime. As youth crime prevails, community fear increases, public safety costs rise, and insecurities abound. It costs more than $40,000 annually to maintain a juvenile in a correctional facility. It costs about $4,000 a year to keep a young person in school. As a result of the erosion of the value of the “family”, the rising costs for education, an increase in prison construction, dilapidated school systems, and cutbacks in state and federal funding, agencies have to rethink their approach to program service delivery. Our ultimate challenge is to debunk various published statistics and promote awareness for what goes on in our community.

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College Track: Creating a Pathway to College in Boyle Heights
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Only one-third of Boyle Heights residents 25 years-old or older have a high school diploma, and only 5% of these residents have a college degree. Additionally, close to 50% of students from Boyle Heights never complete high school. On a host of academic measures, schools in Boyle Heights have historically been very low performing. In 2010, 41% of Roosevelt High School students graduated high school in four years, and only 22% of those graduates were eligible to attend a four-year university. At Hollenbeck Middle School, only 6% of 8th grade students scored proficient or advanced in math and 19% in English language arts (ELA). At Roosevelt High School, only 5% of students are proficient or advanced in math and 26% in ELA. We intend to change all of this. College Track's services are linked to a proven model of college preparation and success. Over the past 16 years, 100% percent of our seniors graduate high school compared to an average of 50% in the districts we serve, over 90% are admitted to a four-year school compared to roughly 15% of students of the same demographic, and 80% of students who completed our high school program have graduated from, or are still attending college. Over time, CT increases the number of college bound students of color in each of the districts and cities we serve. For example, in 2008 when we opened our center in San Francisco’s Bayview Hunter’s Point neighborhood, only 6 African-American students graduated from the neighborhood high school eligible to attend a 4-year university. Since graduating our first class in San Francisco in 2012, we have sent 120 students to college from the Bayview, and we are poised to increase the San Francisco Unified School District’s college bound African-American students by 30% by 2016. We expect to see similar results and impact for our Boyle Heights center. Specifically, this work will benefit Los Angeles by: 1) Positively impacting academic outcomes for Boyle Heights, Roosevelt High School, and in time, the LAUSD. 2) Creating a pathway to college for underprivileged students in Boyle Heights who would not have the opportunity to pursue a 4-year degree were it not for our support. 3) Transforming Boyle Heights into a community where it is the expectation, not the exception, for students to pursue and obtain a 4-year degree. 4) Contributing to the economic vitality of the city, by creating a strong, educated work force in one of the city’s most vulnerable neighborhoods.

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Harmony Project
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Harmony Project exists to serve low-income families, for whom the program is provided at no cost. Harmony Project founder, Dr. Margaret Martin, saw how music can shape intellectual development in underserved children and bring hope and greater well-being to families facing substantial challenges. With rare exception, we accept only those families whose income is below 185% of federal poverty level (this corresponds to the eligibility criteria for the Los Angeles Unified School District’s free/reduced lunch program). The neighborhoods we serve must have at least 50% of students eligible for the lunch program. Currently, students’ age range is from 6-18, with an average age of 11; 59% are female and 41% are male. The demographics of the 1,659 unduplicated youth we serve are: 70% Latino, 10% African-American, 10% Asian/Pacific Islander, 2% White, and 8% Mixed/Other/ Unknown. By virtue of their poverty and the neighborhoods in which they live, Harmony Project’s target population is at risk for juvenile involvement in gangs, drug and alcohol abuse, aggression, school drop-out, teenage pregnancy and parenting, depression, and suicide. Most of our programs are located within Los Angeles’ twelve Gang Reduction & Youth Development Zones designated by the Mayor’s Office, neighborhoods up to four square miles in area where documented rates of violent gang crime are 400% greater than elsewhere in the city. The study and practice of music provides a wide range of benefits in terms of cognitive and social development (e.g., improved academic performance, self-esteem, behavior). With cutbacks in public education, no music program in Los Angeles is providing the type of program that can deliver these benefits. The RAND Corporation’s 2004 report entitled, Gifts of the Muse: Reframing the Debate About the Benefits of Arts, highlights that “the most important benefits require sustained involvement in the arts.” Even with the many arts organizations in the city, no other commits to students for their entire childhood, providing a hands-on, year-round program with high expectations, and other program elements research has shown to be effective in fostering positive changes in participants. Harmony Project is providing services to communities that otherwise remain isolated and invisible. The students and families participating in Harmony Project today are the future of Los Angeles. We are creating the next generation of community members who will be educated, productive members of society and who will be eager to seek out, support, promote and participate in a Los Angeles rich in culture and music. These participants who graduate today will come back to invest, teach, and support social programs that will benefit new generations to come.

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California Calls’ voter engagement program will help to reclaim the democratic process that now belongs to special interests, lobbyists and campaign committees. We encourage low-income voters to exercise their democratic right to vote with stunning success. The simple reason is that our “messengers”—the volunteers and team members who reach out to voters—are peers. Through the community-based organizations which operate these programs, young, bi-lingual people of color serve as door-to-door canvassers and phone bankers who talk to voters. They establish a rapport that earns the trust of skeptical voters. By engaging voters consistently in understanding crucial public policy issues (not only during election cycles), the California Calls model of voter engagement will produce several direct benefits: a. Advance Policies to Benefit Low-Income People: Our member organizations (see below) have outstanding track records winning significant benefits for low-income communities throughout Los Angeles, including: • reducing the number of nuisance liquor stores and transient motels; • assuring that all high schools offer college-prep courses and adequate college counselors; • negotiating with large companies—like Dreamworks—to provide jobs and apprenticeship training for inner city youth; • designing an energy conservation program for publicly-owned buildings that trains inner city youth in “green” construction; • creating programs for homeowners to avoid foreclosure and stay in their homes • closing toxic and harmful factories next to schools The proposed voter outreach program will enable all four community organizations to identify and recruit local residents to become involved in ongoing campaigns and to develop their leadership skills. b. Increase Voter Turnout so LA’s Electorate Reflects Our Population: The California Call’s model of civic engagement targets new and occasional voters in low-income Latino, African-American and immigrant neighborhoods. By increasing the voting participation rate of these residents, our program will help to insure that policies and candidates will more closely reflect the views and desires of residents of Los Angeles—the true meaning of democracy. Especially in local elections where turnout rates are historically low, this program can create a tipping point for greater representation of low-income communities. c. Create Accountability for Elected Representatives through an Informed Citizenry California Calls will increase accountability and transparency of elected representatives by creating a more informed and engaged citizenry. Our Telephone Town Halls will provide voters with the opportunity to hear directly—and engage directly—with the City’s new Mayor, new City Council members and other elected officials. The ongoing education and discussion through door-to-door canvassing and high-capacity phone outreach will increase the level of voter understanding on key issues.

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Safer 'Hoods Through Arts, Action, and Community
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Every Angeleno, regardless of class, race, or zip code should have the opportunity to live in a safe neighborhood. Ensuring that all people have access to safe parks, streets, and violence-free neighborhoods creates a more unified and stronger Los Angeles. However, there are communities in our city that continue to suffer from violence and higher rates of crime. With these racial and economic disparities, we are failing as a city to ensure everyone has an equal opportunity to reach their full potential. Organizing mass based cultural events as a part of a larger community organizing strategy to address public safety benefits Los Angeles in several ways. 1. Ensuring South Los Angeles has safe neighborhoods through prevention is good for everyone. Los Angeles benefits from advancing policies and strategies that prevent crime, rather than deter through punishment in several ways. Everyone benefits from having less people in prison and leading positive lives. It saves taxpayers money and allows for greater use of resources on programs that Angelinos care about like parks and recreation, youth services, and education. By advancing community driven solutions that create safer parks, schools and libraries, we not only increase public safety, but we also tackle equity and opportunity. More students will graduate, more families will stay in the community, and more Angelinos will take advantage of the rich history, culture, and institutions South Los Angeles offers the city. 2. Large-scale cultural events in South Los Angeles promote civic engagement. Just as important as the change we create, is the way in which it is created. By believing in everyday people, developing their leadership, and creating opportunities for them to work together the best and most sustainable kind of neighborhood transformation is created. Getting people involved in the solution is a critical component to sustaining it for the long term. We seek to ensure that residents not only come to an event but also become involved in our public safety campaigns. Typically, events are one time in nature, and benefit the community for its set time. By making these events a part of an on-going organizing strategy, it moves beyond a one-time event into something meaningful throughout the year. 3. Brings positive attention to communities labeled as dangerous Many communities throughout Los Angeles regularly hold entertainment events that bring thousands of residents together and help to establish a neighborhood identity, sense of pride, and build connections among attendees. Whether it’s the Sunset Strip Music Festival, or others, these events serve to put these communities on the map, and engender positive associations and good will. Unfortunately, South Los Angeles is at a deficit when it comes to these types of events. Our events will build community ownership, promote social connectivity, and bring public attention to successful community driven efforts.

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Dream Resource Center
Dream Resource Center
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Los Angeles will benefit from higher rates of high-school graduation and increased civic engagement among youth. The proposed project will thereby advance the UCLA Labor Center’s commitment to promote access to higher education for underrepresented communities. We expect our Dream Resource Center model will provide information, leadership development opportunities, and infrastructure for building support networks among immigrant youth to be replicated on campuses throughout the city. This will increase opportunities for immigrant youth to participate in leadership development programs, promote civic engagement, and encourage greater access to higher education. Positive immigration policy change is currently being debated nationally and will happen within the near future. Immigrant youth leaders trained through this program will achieve their educational goals, emerge as leaders in their own communities, and advance policies and programs to promote immigrant integration.

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Making LA
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de LaB anticipates that our audience will be thrilled to support a yearlong “Making LA” series, in which each person has the chance to meet and interact with the creative individuals--architects, designers and artists--who are shaping and in some cases, reshaping, the future of Los Angeles. Measurements of success will based upon de LaB’s ability to reach new and diverse audiences at rapid speed, which we have done in the past. <br><br> In spring 2012, de LaB’s Subway Terminal Tour spiked the organization’s number of email subscribers by one third in a single month due to the overwhelming desire by Angelenos to understand our city’s great past. de LaB anticipates that new programming that has the impact to affect the way people feel about their city will foster the same enthusiasm. Additionally, de LaB’s goal, as always, will be to reach more and more diverse communities of Angelenos who attend our events, not because of a particular affiliation with the design community, but purely because they love the city in which they live and they want it to be a healthy, sustainable and dynamic place well into the future.

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Boot Camp 2050 for Change
Boot Camp 2050 for Change
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L.A. needs a social force to bring the next generation of idealists into conversation and action. This proposal will bring together Impact Professionals and grassroots leaders representing a cross section of race, class, gender, sexuality and geography to overcome socially constructed boundaries which we recognize are imaginary and changeable. By bringing together, L.A.’s next generation of idealists, Liberty Hill will catalyze a new and impactful force for change in many neighborhoods and on multiple issues. Since these efforts and campaigns will be driven by this generation, we can channel our region’s available potential –its people who are yearning to connect– to reshape L.A. into a vigorous, thriving and pleasing place to live by 2050. Our 40-year track record tells us that by building on longtime relationships of trust and supporting those relationships with high-impact training, the benefits to L.A.’s political and social life are potentially enormous.

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S(t)imulate LA
S(t)imulate LA
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Planning and building in Los Angeles tends to be an isolated affair, where the public is engaged only when it directly affects their neighborhood. Through a fun game, we expect to reach out to a larger audience to educate them about how planning and building policy that addresses the entire city accumulates to affect broader quality of life issues. We also think the outcomes of this game, our hosted events, and the exhibition of the best scenarios will create opportunities to engage with the City of LA’s planning and building departments on the subject of zoning and development in Los Angeles. Our hope is to identify mechanisms through policy or strategic investment by these agencies that could have the greatest impact on the development of LA through 2050.

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Smart Growth for All: Affordable Housing Near Public Transit
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Our project will use legal and policy tools to help lift up the voices of residents and community organizations engaged in planning for transit-oriented development in Los Angeles. If the process of developing TOD plans meaningfully incorporates such voices, those plans will result in documented benefits of equitable TOD, including affordable housing for residents with low income around major transit stops; increased community access to jobs, healthcare, and fresh food; increased public transportation ridership; increased public investment and economic activity; and reduced traffic congestion, greenhouse gas emissions, and commuting times. Most of all, as Los Angeles develops its transit infrastructure, it will do so in a manner that allows it to retain its socio-economic, racial, and cultural diversity, and that does not push out existing communities and residents. A number of affordable housing advocates and community-based organizations have sought our legal assistance in influencing local TOD planning processes and in advancing affordable housing and anti-displacement policies near transit in South and East LA. Particularly after our success in achieving innovative policies to advance affordable housing and economic development in the Cornfields Arroyo, there is great momentum to achieve similar innovations in other local plans and in citywide planning processes. Specifically, through this project: • Organizations working to advance affordable housing near transit will have legal tools and increased capacity to shape the development of their neighborhoods; • The views of community-based organizations serving low-income people in Los Angeles will be represented in TOD planning processes; and • Proposed California transit legislation will contain language that supports low-income communities.

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Alliance College-Ready Public Schools - BLAST
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With just the current BLAST schools, Alliance will provide a high-quality, 21st century college-preparatory education for more than 3,750 low-income students annually in Los Angeles’ most underserved communities. Additionally, Alliance plans to grow the number of new BLAST schools by 10 over the next five years, ultimately educating 9,000 low-income students in Los Angeles annually. District-wide, LAUSD high schools graduate only 65% of their students and only 22% of those graduate with the required “A-G” college preparatory classes needed to attend a four-year public university in California. In contrast, Alliance schools graduate 92% of their students in four years and send 95% of graduates to college. It is estimated that a high school graduate will earn nearly $400,000 more over his or her lifetime than a high school dropout, and a college graduate will earn nearly $1.6M more. In addition, high school dropouts are eight times more likely to be incarcerated, 50% less likely to vote, and are under-qualified for 90% of jobs. Two-thirds of dropouts will use public welfare benefits at some point in their lives. The benefit to Los Angeles is the increased earnings and increased tax revenue generated for each Alliance high school and college graduate, and the savings from public assistance and incarceration costs. Alliance BLAST graduates also increase the pool of potential employees, entrepreneurs, and business leaders in the digital economy that makes up an increasingly large piece of Los Angeles’ economic growth. As importantly, Alliance high school and college graduates provide community stability and civic involvement in their neighborhoods, city, and state. Beyond Alliance BLAST schools, our goal is to serve as a model for other schools and districts and to share our lessons and best practices, therefore helping improve academic performance, high school graduation, and college completion rates for thousands more Los Angeles public school students outside the Alliance. Alliance’s early success with BLAST has drawn a significant level of interest from many in the broader public education community. Alliance hosts regular observation visits at BLAST schools for school leaders, district officials, researchers, and policy makers, and Alliance staff are called on regularly to speak at education and policy conferences. Alliance has also held preliminary discussions with two local university schools of education to discuss potential joint residency and teaching programs to prepare new teachers for the effective use of educational technology.

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Only 10 percent of the individuals who join TFA report that teaching is one of their top career options. Yet 93 percent of our program’s alumni report they support TFA’s mission through career, philanthropy, volunteerism, or graduate study and 63 percent still work or study full-time in education. Our project will develop the next generation of city leaders in Los Angeles who are deeply committed to our students and a stronger education system.<BR> <BR> We have seen the benefits our corps members bring to their individual classrooms, to entire school buildings, and to school systems: <BR> <BR> <b>Teacher Leadership</b><BR> Los Angeles native Beatrice Viramontes (corps year ‘08) taught math and science at John Leichty Middle School just a few miles west of downtown. All of her Algebra students started the year at varying levels behind grade level. By the end of the year, 70 percent of her students were on or above grade level. Algebra is frequently referred to as a gatekeeper subject because it is the first in a series of higher-level math classes needed to succeed in college and life. Beatrice’s class was a stepping stone for even greater accomplishments; so far, her students have been accepted at Emerson College, Northwestern University, San Francisco State, and the University of California Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz and San Diego. Beatrice now coaches and supports groups of corps members working to help future college applicants make their dreams a reality. <BR> <b>School Leadership</b> <BR> Many of our alumni become principals to expand their impact from individual classrooms to entire school sites. Six of our 50 alumni school leaders are at the helm of California Distinguished Elementary Schools, including Frank Lozier (corps year ’00), the principal of Laurel Street Elementary in the Compton Unified School District. Laurel Street achieved a remarkable 927 Academic Performance Index (API) score last year. (API scores range from 200 to 1000, and the statewide target is 800.) <BR> <b>School System Leadership</b><BR> With more than two decades in Los Angeles, we also have 13 alumni impacting whole school systems, including: • Tommy Chang (corps year ’97), Superintendent of Intensive Support and Innovation, who oversees 130 schools and 130,000 students, including a majority of chronically failing schools in the LAUSD; • Gordon Gibbings (corps year ’99) and Chad Soleo (corps year ’01), both Cluster Directors overseeing groups of principals for Green Dot Public Schools; and • Angella Martinez (corps year ’01), Chief Academic Officer for KIPP LA schools. <BR> <BR> This spring, we will welcome the next group of new teachers, who we will train and support over the coming two years. These corps members may be the next Beatrice Viramontes, Frank Lozier or Tommy Chang, opening doors for thousands more Los Angeles students who deserve an excellent education.

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PARK-IN-A-BOX
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Los Angeles has many park-poor neighborhoods and many communities have limited access to usable open space. Obesity levels are high, caused in part by lack of access to active spaces and programs. Park-in-a-Box, with partner organizations, will provide access to underutilized space in underserved neighborhoods, and provide the ingredients necessary for lively and useable open spaces. Through this new model, Park-in-a-Box hopes to draw attention to the need for public spaces within these communities and encourage Angelinos to re-evaluate how we think about public space in our city. Please visit www.park-in-a-box.la for more information about how Park-in-a-Box works (more images after the jump).

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Mentoring through Education Movement
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Mentoring through Education will benefit LA by providing innovative, hands-on, and experiential educational services and workshops, with the development of Learning Communities. We expect over 300 students to be served throughout Los Angeles County in high-crime, high poverty communities over the course of the project. However, through the implementation of Learning Communities, the number of individuals served throughout Los Angeles will multiply drastically. Through these teaching communities, LA will benefit by creating more jobs, decreasing unemployment rates, improving the health of LA residents, creating safe environments for residents to live, and inspiring residents to educate their children at a very young age. Mentoring has shown to positively impact the lives of youth all over the world. It has inspired young people to face and overcome obstacles within their lives. Through the Mentoring through Education Movement, this project will revolutionize the way of learning, allowing young people to have a support system as they progress through not only their educational goals, but their lives. Through our embedded mentoring, community service, and restorative justice approach, we expect LA to benefit from our young leaders who are succeeding and giving back to their communities. By fostering young leaders to reach their goals and succeed in their lives, we expect the same individuals to model and inspire other young people to become future leaders. Collaborative Tutoring envisions the increase in high school diploma attainment rates within the Los Angeles County. With this, we expect that college-going rates will increase. It is our goal to build up young leaders that will pave the way for their own children and embed education within their children’s lives.

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The HeArt Project: Arts Education ends the Dropout Crisis in LA
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HP is one of the only arts organizations in L.A. that works exclusively with alternative high school students. Students attend alternative high schools (continuation and community day schools) for reasons including failing grades and behavioral problems, teen pregnancy/parenting, gang involvement, expulsion from their home school districts, or prior incarceration. Most are low-income minorities, and all are at high risk of dropping out for good. Our students have experienced high levels of transience and failure, perceive a lack of future possibilities, and have difficulty recognizing the value of their contributions and connection to others. As a result they are often unable to envision a future where they embark on fulfilling careers, feel a meaningful connection to their community, or identify and pursue substantive goals. We have witnessed through the years -- and research in the field supports our experience -- that the arts are a particularly effective mechanism to inspire hard-to-reach youth. Many HP students are part of rampant cycles of poverty, gang involvement and violence that perpetuate themselves within their families and communities. HP helps students help themselves and chart a new course in life. HP students connect with professional mentors, contribute to a positive peer network, graduate high school, and pursue substantive goals. By investing in their own potential, these teenagers transform into fulfilled and responsible adults with a stake in their communities. HP’s work is significantly underscored by a major report just recently released from the National Endowment for the Arts, “Arts and Achievement in At-Risk Youth” (2012), which compiles findings from four longitudinal studies. One example from the study is that in two separate databases, students who had arts-rich experiences in high school showed higher overall GPAs than did students who lacked those experiences. And further, high school students who earned few or no arts credits were five times more likely not to have graduated than students who earned many arts credits. This significant effect of the arts on the graduation rate of at-risk teenagers mirrors what we have witnessed in our 20 years of service.

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Giving 200 leaders of the LA2050 initiative a potent tool for dealing with stress and actualizing their highest potential will translate to more creative solutions, more effective programs, and more profound results.

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BE GREAT Mentoring Program
BE GREAT Mentoring Program
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The high school dropout rate in Los Angeles County is more than 20%. This rate is even higher for Hispanic and black students and students from low-income households. The community at Mar Vista Gardens, which is 84% Hispanic and has 55% of households living at the federal poverty level, is highly representative of this achievement gap. Through this project, we would be able to establish the BE GREAT program at Mar Vista Gardens as a model for other low-income and public housing communities. In fact, the Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles (HACLA) plans to use our after-school program, which is built around BE GREAT, as the model for youth programs at all of its housing sites. As a result, the program has the potential to impact nearly 7,000 young HACLA residents, and this number is continuing to grow as HACLA develops more low-income housing sites. Specifically, the BE GREAT model has proven to have the following results for youth participants who complete the program (based on data collected by the Boys & Girls Clubs of America over two years): • 54% maintained or improved their school attendance • 77% showed a constant or improved grade in reading • 74% showed a constant or improved grade in math • 56% maintained or improved their behavior at school • 98% progressed to the next grade level on time By implementing BE GREAT at Mar Vista Gardens, our ultimate goal is to break the cycle of poverty for families living in the community. BE GREAT uses strength-based strategies and problem solving techniques to help young people develop the academic, emotional and social skills necessary to succeed in school. Improved academic achievement will encourage students to stay in school and graduate on time, thus increasing opportunities for advancement through college and employment.

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MASTERY LA: Map Learning & Expertise for Lifelong Exploration
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1. Map over 1000 masters of Los Angeles to show pockets of expertise and human resources ready to be connected. 2. Help youth discover opportunities to continue their education inside and outside traditional learning environments in fun, interactive ways. 3. Provide a bridge to funding, grants, technology, training and support for transitional youth who may be falling through the cracks through open events with experts on hand to help. 4. Match the masters of LA and the students who are ready to learn new skills for new apprenticeships and guilds. 5. Offer events that contribute to cultural/arts/connectedness within our communities through alignments with partners throughout the Los Angeles creative communities and other LA2050 grantees. 6. Provide momentum for independent learning with tools to track progress and demonstrate skillbuilding for employment. 7. Connect thousands of learning resources already engaging in improving LA and help people find the best community resources for their personal growth. 8. Understand how we learn better over time and help each individual find an individual learning path that suits their preferences and abilities. 9. Improve dropout rates by providing alternatives that are engaging, local and appropriate for the individual learning profile. 10. Encourage mastery learning and 21st century skills by showing the high quality talent already working within Los Angeles and how we can all work together to make a more amazing and creative city together. 11. Work together to envision the city we want to live in at hackathon events and city festivals. 12. Empower students to finish their GED by making it into an interactive game played in Google Hangouts to bring together transitional youth with opportunities to learn and complete goals. 13. Provide easier access to grants and local funding opportunities for foster youth and other young adults who may be prone to homelessness without support. 14. Improve literacy and soft skills by utilizing tablets and mobile devices to creatively engage difficult students in new ways, using music, hands-on experiences and local masters to bridge the gaps in learning. 15. Create ripple momentum for a @MasteryLA campaign to encourage everyone to become a master in their chosen field and follow their passion through social media and events. 16. Encourage youth to share their learning process publically through events, social media, in learning centers and on the EDDEFY platform. 17. Map the connections between masters and students and how these relationships evolve over time to understand how to improve local education and mentorship services. 18. Identify the areas of the city where services need to be focused for future success between now and 2050. 19. Partner with great local resources to grow great relationships between youth and local masters: BuiltinLA, Mentor organizations and Foster Youth organizations: Kids Alliance, ILP, First Place for Youth

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Student Eco Riders
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Transit is expanding in LA County thanks to voter-approved Measure R. We’ll get seven new light rail, subway and bus rapid transit lines over the next 30 years – or possibly sooner if our efforts to accelerate the construction are successful. Building ridership for the bigger and better transit is key to getting the environmental benefits we’re after. Santa Monica College’s efforts are producing concrete results. A traffic study from 2010 found that whopping 40% of Santa Monica College's 34,000 students and 1,800 staff used the bus to get to campus in the morning. That’s huge when you consider that in LA County less than 7% of people use transit to get to work now. In 2009, LA Community College District offered a deeply discounted transit pass to students ($15 for 6 months) and students took nearly six million transit trips that year and reduced VMT (vehicle miles traveled) by 42 million miles and CO2 emissions by 36 tons. That’s the kind of impact we need to address climate change. In San Bernardino County, Omnitrans estimates that student ridership has risen from less than 5% to over 20% following a pilot program with free transit passes. College students are the ideal group to win over to transit for several reasons. First, they are a significant part of the population, in fact, over the next decade about 10% of LA County residents will be enrolled in community colleges alone. And students are more mobile, more open to trying new things, more environmentally conscious, and more creative when it comes to stretching their limited budgets. Learning to take transit, or experimenting with living “car-light” makes a lot more sense to college students than it does to the general public.

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$1,000,000 in total grants
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Submission Began
Tuesday, February 26

Submission Ended
Thursday, March 28
at 12:00 PM PDT

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Voting Began
Tuesday, April 02

Voting Ended
Wednesday, April 17
at 12:00 PM PDT

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Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address

Winner Announced
Wednesday, May 08

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