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Parent and Child Training Program
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• This project can be replicated throughout Los Angeles once proven effective at Roosevelt High School. Alma Family Services’ knowledge and track record using different Evidence Based Practices and other Prevention and Early Intervention models has led to significant reduction of risk factors that might lead to violent behavior. Implementation of this program will directly affect Roosevelt High School and the community at large by addressing the roots of violence. Several studies have indicated that violence leads to truancy, lower educational attainment and thus lower level jobs. Also, the psychoemotional and financial cost of violence in schools to poorer families is high, affecting their ability to escape the poverty trap. This project aims at reducing youth’s arrests for crimes including vandalism, trespassing, and tagging. Primary and secondary prevention programs have the potential to generate systemic change. Students will be encouraged to practice cooperation and show responsibility towards their own school and community. Family engagement is critical to promote student achievement. Successful students are more likely to become productive citizens and contribute with their community, the City and County of Los Angeles.

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Grades of Green - Los Angeles Youth Corps
Grades of Green - Los Angeles Youth Corps
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<p>Grades of Green’s LAYC will benefit Los Angeles in several important ways. </p> <p>First and foremost, each participating school and school community will receive direct environmental benefit from that school’s Green Project, be it a Walk to School Wednesday or Trash-Free Tuesday Lunch Campaign, an e-Waste Collection, a Campus-Wide Detox, a Compost System Implementation, a clean up of a local park or beach or whatever Green Project the team chooses to implement. Results of the Green Projects will range from fewer carbon emissions, less trash sent to local landfills, proper disposal of electronic materials, the elimination of toxic chemicals on campus and so on. </p> <p>Additionally, each of the 10 participating schools will become a “Grades of Green School” with access to over 40 free, fun and hands-on environmental education tools and activities they can continue to implement on campus for the years to come. The schools can build on their experience and success and take on additional green activities as they are ready. Statistics indicate, and our experience confirms, that when schools implement programs like the ones we have detailed on our website, the schools typically save money, test scores go up and students learn valuable lessons about the power their individual actions can have in helping to protect the environment. </p> <p>Moreover, we have found that by educating and inspiring our kids to care for and protect the environment, we are raising environmental awareness in our communities through a “trickle up” approach. That is, when students learn, for example, about the “4Rs” – reduce, reuse, recycle and rot (composting) – they often go home and ask their parents to help them pack trash free lunches or set up recycle and/or composting systems at home. Students also take these ideas to their teachers and administrators and ask for their help making their schools cleaner and greener. We have even seen students empowered by our education programs petition their local governments for environmental measures. In Manhattan Beach, for example, Grades of Green kids were the impetus behind the City banning the use of plastic bags. Hermosa Beach students were credited with convincing their City Council to ban the use of Styrofoam containers in local restaurants. The LAYC will inspire and empower students to care for and protect the environment; those students, in turn, will inspire and empower their broader school community, including their parents, educators, community leaders and businesspeople to care for and protect the environment. This ripple effect will benefit the entire city of Los Angeles. </p> <p>Finally, and most importantly, we are shaping the minds and habits of Los Angeles’ next generation of leaders, teachers, voters, executives and parents – the people who can make a difference in what Los Angeles looks like in 2050. </p>

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Change-Making Gardens
Change-Making Gardens
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Right now to get a plot at a community garden, in most places in LA County you have to wait 3 to 6 YEARS. Meanwhile, there are many groups that are “thinking about” creating a community garden. ECM’s networking partners know specific landholders who are “thinking about” opening their land to growing food. Yet all these groups are scared of the unknown because they have never done it before. We have. We’ve created gardens in several vastly different models of what “community gardening” can mean (traditional plot style, school garden, and charity style). We can share what works and what doesn’t work, and help groups who are “thinking about it” get past the mulling-it-over stage into meaningful action – into creating real, physical, much-needed garden spaces. Ultimately, our project will facilitate much more land being available for community gardens in Los Angeles. Additionally, ECM has the connections – locally, nationally and internationally – with people who are taking a proactive stance to the threats posed by climate change, peak oil, resource limitations, and economic contraction. These are big scary problems, but there is plenty that we can do as grassroots citizens. Our project will lead to greater awareness of the issues, with more people striving to prepare our city and its citizens for the realities of the future.

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Dear Los Angeles
Dear Los Angeles
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I've lived in Los Angeles for 12 years, first moving here from Connecticut to attend film school at USC. Since then, I've seen many people move here and leave, and become angry and agitated about Los Angeles. They viewed it as a city with no art, no connectedness, and no real opportunities. However, the reason I love L.A. and have stayed here for so long is because of the art, the culture, and the limitless potential I find here. I've received and witnessed endless opportunities, and I want to convey that to the people around me. By conveying that excitement, we will mobilize hundreds of people across the greater metro area to get involved in beautification projects and voter initiatives. We can motivate people to volunteer as a social activity, as well as an important lifelong goal. We hope to engage in early outreach, in order to get ahead of the trends and the important movements, instead of just following them.

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The power in an hour: Putting time for teachers back in a principal's day
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Across Los Angeles every morning, 750,000 students enter their classrooms. Each of these classrooms is led by a teacher. And each teacher should have a leader who can come into their classroom, observe their instruction and help them to grow so that those 750,000 students get the education that they need to be successful. Our LA2050 proposal will enable this to happen at a dramatically greater scale. This project will identify great ideas, develop them into tools that can be replicated, and test them for efficacy. Once they have been demonstrated to be effective they will be ready to be shared across the hundreds of schools that exist in LA. For example, a tool that saves a principal <b>an hour a day</b>, spread to schools across Los Angeles would translate to nearly a <b>225,000 hours of coaching and support</b> for teachers in their classrooms during each school year. By 2050 this would lead to over <b>8 million</b> additional hours spent developing effective educators in LA.

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Roving Río Vista: A Park on the Move
Roving Río Vista: A Park on the Move 13 Pink-talk-bubble-tail
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<p>A Roving Rio Vista is just one component of a larger effort to make the L.A. River into a great Los Angeles civic space and outdoor destination. Our emerging Greenway 2020 campaign aims to make the entire L.A. River bike-able & walk-able by the year 2020. President Obama recognized the L.A. River as one of only two public spaces in California for his America's Great Outdoors initiative to champion conservation and recreation in the 21st century. A Roving Río Vista is just one of the many public amenities that could be along the L.A. River, encouraging civic engagement and connectivity.<p> Specifically, the proposed Roving Río Vista will: • Expand social connectedness and civic engagement by bringing people together in a common space • Increase community input on revitalizing the LA River – building healthy urban communities • Create active public space along the LA River • Promote the LA River Greenway 2020 campaign to create a continuous greenway for public benefit

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URBAN TxT’s hacker space will benefit Los Angeles by creating an innovation hub in one of the areas with the highest number of youths and the lowest number of educational opportunities. The open access to technology and educational resources will keep kids off the street while arming them with the skills they actually need to not just survive, but excel in life. An innovation center that doubles as a technological sanctuary will make our younger generations more appealing to future employees, prepare them to be the best professionals in LA, and more importantly, give them the business and technology skills so that they can start their own ventures. Detention rooms in our South Los Angeles high schools are filled with African American and Latino males. High incarceration and dropout rates plague male students in South Los Angeles as on average 54% of them will not graduate high school. Those who graduate school are often times unprepared to enter the workforce. This creates a growing skills gap for STEM positions in which demand outweighs the supply of a skilled workforce, especially in South LA. URBAN TxT’s hacker space tackles the root issues and turns what is now a weakness into a strength. The hacker space is part of a larger vision that will turn LA into the breeding ground for the next wave of innovators and visionaries of the world. By giving a person of any age, background, ethnicity or religion the skills to innovate and a safe place to do so, we unleash vast amounts of untapped potential that would have otherwise been wasted. URBAN TxT’s hacker space will be the catalyst that will turn a poverty stricken, gang infested and crime riddled area into a case study for what could be if the right people assets and capital were in place. The hacker space will spark a movement towards more collaboration in learning, innovative use of resources and spaces to drive new ideas and a dedication to education and personal growth unlike anything the city has seen before. A technology driven community space like URBAN TxT’s hacker space will open up a world of opportunities to all members of the community. This space will encourage everyone to innovate, use its resources to find job opportunities and online educational programs and to discover what the world has to offer through technology. The hacker space will spark more than just our youths, it will spark unity and forward thinking within an area that continues to fall behind the rest of the city and the country. Community members will be encouraged to take advantage of free online classes through programs like iTunes U while connecting with people all over the world with software like Skype of Google+ Hangouts. The benefits of URBAN TxT's hacker space go well past South LA. The organization will create a team of ambassadors to share knowledge and the vision for technology and education merging together. The team will share findings with the city, while inviting everyone to be a part of it.

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LA American Indian College Education Initiative
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According to the U.S. Census Bureau in 2008, 155,010 American Indians live in Los Angeles. Los Angeles led all of the nation's counties in the number of people of this racial category. The LA American Indian College Education Initiative will help American Indian students achieve academic success middle school through college for the purpose of becoming successful and positive community roles models in Los Angeles.

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Pesticide-Free Los Angeles 2050
Pesticide-Free Los Angeles 2050 26 Pink-talk-bubble-tail
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The conventional wisdom is that Los Angeles is polluted, smoggy and utterly beyond repair. Residents who don't know anything else succumb to apathy and do little to invest in the quality of their local environment. Beyond helping to create a healthier ecosystem (air, water and soil quality), we believe that Pesticide-Free Los Angeles will elicit an enduring investment in the local environment from a significant and meaningful number of the city's denizens. People are always shocked—then pleasantly surprised—to learn that the city is the last, best hope for the survival of the honey bee. A HoneyLove project will educate, enlighten and inspire the hearts and minds of current and future residents of Los Angeles and as a result will garner the magnitude of investment we need to reduce pollutants and restore the health of our communities. Our project's most tangible offering to the Los Angeles community will be a mobile app that allows users to track the use of pesticides in public spaces, and receive a score card for how their local park, green space, or high school sports field is performing.

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Engaging the Reluctant Volunteer
Engaging the Reluctant Volunteer 8 Pink-talk-bubble-tail
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<p>Our project will benefit L.A. by making helping easy, accessible and inclusive. More than that, by bringing people of different worlds together in the name of helping, and focusing on what we have it common, it will be clear what we can accomplish when we work together. Finally, by working to make events impactful, rewarding and fun, we will help build a culture of helping and civic engagement.</p> Along the way, we will fill food pantries, stock classrooms, tend gardens, fix buildings, raise money for worthy causes, and engage, empower, validate and bring together people of all ages, backgrounds and means throughout LA.</p> <p>We are reluctant to give numbers because then the tail can start wagging the dog. Of course, we understand that goals are important: so we can promise to next year give away 20,000 books or 25,000 pounds of food or 5000 bags of clothing; provide 2500 Christmas toys, or raise thousands of dollars to send kids to camp, fight cancer, or respond to a natural disaster. Host a community dinner for 200 every month, create an annual art show and pet adoption and concert. Hold beautification days at 50 different schools. Make large scale capital improvements at shelters, afterschool facilities, or homes for vets or seniors. Engage 50,000 people a year. All are doable, and we've done them and more.</p> <p>Here's the thing: Big Sunday is, perhaps, not the youngest or hippest organization out there. And, while we see how important it is to engage young people, we think people can still help after they're 34. Or 54. Or 94. Big Sunday is nothing if not inclusive, reaching out to and including people of all ages and backgrounds and at all socio-economic levels, letting them know that they're wanted and needed, getting them involved, and bringing them together with other good-hearted people.</p> <p>Full disclosure: We'd considered coming up with some very specific project for this proposal. But having been around for a number of years, we believe that there is no silver bullet. Change comes about through an ongoing, concerted effort. We are proud of the work we do and have done, and an opportunity like this would allow us to continue and expand it. When we started years ago, we said we wanted to be a group that brings people together to make the world a better place, not in response to a catastrophe, or because of a single compelling incident, but because it's the right thing to do. We like to think that we, through the ongoing generosity, goodwill, hard work, humor, dirty hands and big hearts of many, have accomplished that.</p> <p>Then again, by creating an easily navigated system to both meet and fulfill needs, and by helping to bring together our terrific brethren in L.A.'s helping world, we can greatly expand this culture of caring, concern and compassion, and engage even more people in the process of making life better and easier for all Angelenos.</p>

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Why is the grass always greener over the leach fields?
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Wildwood Mobile Home Country Club Park is at the end of two natural corridors and is also at the end of an industrial corridor, and a direct intervention at Wildwood would quickly impact this depraved community and improve the environmental quality for hundreds: The San Jose Creek is straddled by the City of Industry. As is often the case around rivers in Los Angeles, where the soil is unstable and sometimes contaminated, they build mobile homes, golf courses and schools, and it’s where the industrial and rail corridors are. The industrial corridor in of its business is revealed to be dangerous sometimes. While many visible occupants in the City of Industry are large chain distribution factories and commercial warehouses, there are some Industrial manufacturing complexes. One notorious neighbor, Quemetco, is a lead recycling plant and within a mile of the Wildwood entrance. Ranked #6 of top polluters in California on an EPA ‘Toxic Release Inventory,’ 1,756,634 pounds of total release (of chemical toxins) in a year, includes lead and nitrate compounds (EPA TRI 2011). Residents have been warned of lead pollution by the company’s required mailed-out literature, of possible arsenic and lead compounds and acid vapors in the air. But some of us cannot move away so easily, as the expression goes, ‘we have lead shoes.’ The Puente-Chino Hills Animal Corridor runs parallel to the elongated City of Industry but to the south and is “an unbroken zone of habitat extending nearly 31 miles from the Cleveland National Forest in Orange County to the west end of the Puente Hills…30,000 acres of land” (Habitat Authority). La Puente Landfill funded the preservation authority (tipping fee) to purchase the nearby Puente Hills (Habitat Authority). A 2005 City of Industry planned development, which cuts off this animal corridor in the middle, reflects a pattern of hostility towards ecological considerations by the City of Industry (Spencer, Puente-Chino “Missing Middle” Analysis). Auspiciously, this animal corridor ends at La Puente Landfill, as the only way to connect across the 605 freeway to Whittier Narrows is to fly over or dig under the freeway and through the river (or go through one child-sized underground tunnel?). This also poses an opportunity to provide habitat for wildlife we’d like to attract, like birds. A solution needs to address both of these issues. As a rail passes within 300 feet of these mobile homes right passed the fairway, a more substantial barrier could be established. The industrial corridor pollutes enough into the river system; more properties need to treat their toxic runoff on site. There has to be more creative solutions than golf courses, especially when they are not in use. A second solution should address the animal corridor and alternative ground paths to Whittier Narrows. Some wildlife will be encouraged to visit Wildwood, especially the healthy bird wildlife found in Los Angeles through habitat planning and planting

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volunteers housing the homeless
volunteers housing the homeless 15 Pink-talk-bubble-tail
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Getting fifteen chronically homeless people off the street and into permanent housing will (1) vastly reduce the amount of taxpayer money spent to take care of them IN the street -- in shelters, in emergency rooms and hospitals, in police stations and jails and prisons; (2) since the effort will be entirely volunteer and OF the community, it will draw the community as a whole into a closer relationship with the homeless generally and help to do away with the notion that we live in one world and they live in another; (3) it will save fifteen perfectly good people from a downward spiral from which most of us would be hard pressed to pull out and, in the case of a number of them, it will return them to a position of productivity alongside the rest of us: to jobs, to social and political interactions of all kinds, and (sure enough) to VOLUNTEERING to help others who are still on the downward spiral.

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PrepareLA – Building Resilience through Community and Volunteer Engagement
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In recent years, we have seen an increase in major disasters across the globe—Hurricane Katrina, earthquakes in Chile and Haiti, the earthquake and tsunami in Japan, and most recently Superstorm Sandy. However, while the number of disasters has increased steadily from the 1970s to today, the reported loss of life has been decreasing, demonstrating that early warnings, preparedness, and planning can save lives. The Los Angeles region is extremely vulnerable to natural disasters such as wildfires and earthquakes. Sadly, the majority of our communities and residents are woefully under-prepared. If a magnitude 7.8 earthquake strikes—as the U.S. Geological Survey predicts is overdue—the loss of lives and infrastructure damage could be devastating. This is why we must engage our local communities now and start creating a culture of preparedness and resilience. PrepareLA will significantly benefit Los Angeles by: o Creating public awareness through multiple media outlets that provide comprehensive and continual disaster preparedness education; o Promoting volunteerism and opportunities for civic engagement; o Conducting free preparedness education presentations for residents (including youth, seniors, non-English speakers, and individuals with functional needs); o Developing multi-lingual, multi-cultural collateral materials to promote preparedness efforts; and o Offering free first aid and CPR classes to low-income and underserved communities. An example of how PrepareLA is already increasing teamwork between the Red Cross and different community segments is our partnership with Faithful Central Bible Church in Inglewood. Our relationship began four years ago when the church signed an agreement with the Red Cross to serve as a shelter site in the event of a disaster. In 2012, our Coordinator invited the church to deepen the collaboration and become a Red Cross Faith-Based Affiliate. Since then we have worked with them to host a series of outreach events and CPR/first aid trainings for church members and the community at large. This partnership has been particularly fruitful as it has connected the Red Cross with a large number of individuals in a densely populated, low-income area. With support from individuals, organizations, businesses and government agencies, we hope to be able to maintain and expand these types of partnerships and increase the number of Angelenos who have taken the necessary preparedness steps to be ready for an emergency. As we all know, disasters can strike at any time, without warning. While we cannot control the timing, we can work to ensure that we are as prepared as we can possibly be. If a high magnitude earthquake hits the Los Angeles region before the community is prepared, damage and loss will be far greater than if tools, partnerships, and materials are in place. An investment in community education and capacity building now will help reduce the impact of a catastrophic disaster, and will save lives.

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SOUND SHARE LA
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The Sound Share LA initiative will have a positive and lasting impact on Los Angeles by: - Educating current and future generations by providing free access to the Sound Share LA website featuring exclusive content including hundreds of interviews, performances, DJ mixes and films. - Enhancing education, research and stimulation of tourism by creating a geo-tagged content map and searchable content database, organized by musician, year, neighborhood and genre. - Increasing community awareness of the city's cultural heritage, history and value. - Providing the opportunity for residents to engage with local musicians in a live setting. - Educating listeners around the world about Los Angeles’ diverse musical contributions. The monthly community radio broadcasts will have an immediate impact within the neighborhoods where they occur. The public will come together to explore notable LA music phases in the very spaces these genres thrived. Audiences will enjoy a full day of free programming giving them rare insight into the people and places behind these influential music developments: 1950’s Central Avenue jazz scene, 1960’s Sunset Strip music revolution, 1970’s Laurel Canyon folk movement, 1980’s downtown punk rock explosion or 1990’s South Central rap uprising among many others. Oral histories from the pioneers who forged these music movements will be shared alongside input from the generations who followed in their footsteps. DJ sets and performances will bring the music genres to life. Attendees and those accessing the radio broadcasts will learn about the musical heritage of specific LA neighborhoods. This experience will educate them about truly unique music breakthroughs from Los Angeles. Eventually these radio shows will have a long term impact as they are made available as online archives. The Sound Share LA project will have a direct impact on the arts and cultural vitality of Los Angeles by creating an ongoing document of not only the past but also contemporary music made in Los Angeles. The Sound Share LA website, in combination with quality live events staged throughout Los Angeles, will expose residents to the rich heritage in every corner of our expansive city.

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Ready, Set, Gold!: A Students' Guide to a Lifetime of Fitness
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RSG! has already benefited Los Angeles - see the results below in evaluating our project quantitatively and qualitatively. RSG! reaches approximately 500 students/school (500 x 50 schools = 25,000 annually). It serves as a continual reminder that the 42 Olympians/Paralympians participating in the program and ranging in age from 20 years old to 72 years old are healthy lifelong models for students in fighting the epidemics of diabetes and obesity because they are the examples of healthy living habits and not diabetic or obese. RSG! is a reminder of the pride people felt in 1984 when we held our second Olympics here in Los Angeles; as I travel throughout Los Angeles, those who were here in '84, always have a story to tell on their volunteering, going to an event, and no traffic! And now Mayor Villaraigosa has tossed our city hat into the ring to host another Olympics in 2024. Who wouldn't want another one after London's successfully hosting their third Olympics. And there's a young man or woman in school now who will be propelled to be an Olympian because of what is set down in LA at this time and become like Olympian David Brinton ('88--cycling) who was motivated by watching the Olympics when he was 9 years old or seeing Olympian Paul Gonzales ('84--Boxing) the first Mexican-American to win a Gold medal.

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Climate Resolve: Inspiring LA to Prosper in a Changing Climate
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Using the LA2050 grant, Climate Resolve will help inform Los Angeles of the climate changes to come so that we can anticipate, prepare for, and reduce the impacts of climate change, while at the same time we help two of the most vulnerable communities in Los Angeles identify solutions and mobilize to take action to make their neighborhood better, stronger, and more resilient to climate change. But our vision extends well beyond the work we will do in 2013-2014. Climate Resolve will leverage our experience, successes, lessons learned, and new partnerships developed with the LA2050 seed funding to scale-up the process into a long-term, city-wide effort of coordinated community-based climate planning and engagement. Climate Resolve will be a “big tent” where non-profit organizations, businesses, civic leaders, and communities can convene to help one another prepare for climate change.

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Make Los Angeles the Innovation Capital of the World
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LAMCII is focused on six specific areas of concern and interest. They are: Education, Policy, Capital, Comparative, Narrative, and Network. We are developing concrete projects aimed at making a real impact on not just the technology and innovation sectors of Los Angeles, but on how the citizens of Los Angeles interact with the city, businesses and each other. All projects are geared towards attracting, and retaining: diverse talent, entrepreneurs, businesses and capital to Los Angeles. In the last year we have begun: The Texpo Innovation Hubs: LAMCII is working in a public/private partnership with the City of Los Angeles, local universities, and recognized environmentally conscious developers to transform city-owned properties along the Expo line transit corridor into ‘innovation hubs’. Innovation happens with diversity: different businesses and organizations bumping up against one another on a daily basis will bring about new and interesting ideas, projects and solutions. These hubs will provide world-class physical space for startups and new economy businesses as well as community space that serves the dual purpose of providing a resource to local groups, organizations, and citizens and exposing our friends and neighbors to the opportunities inherent within the tech sector. Phase one is underway at the Jefferson Transfer Yard, a 220,000 square foot facility slated to become the first Texpo Innovation Hub. LAMCII has identified four other sites along the Expo line that are earmarked for development in phase two of the project. Following the line to USC and Downtown LA, this will quickly enhance the flow-through of information and innovation. There will be bike rentals available at all of the Texpo Innovation Hubs, a small but powerful catalyst for green commuting, better relationships with the community, and better health for employees and residents. EdgeLA Fellowship Program: We interviewed LAMCII members, many of whom own businesses in Los Angeles, and asked how many open positions are available at their companies. In August of 2012, from 25 members surveyed, there were over 550 open positions at local companies. Los Angeles County produces more graduates and has more residents holding PhDs than any other in America, but from our survey of Los Angeles universities, we know that at least 50% of engineering graduates leave Los Angeles. There is a huge opportunity for a stronger relationship between the nearly 1.1 million college students and businesses in the greater LA area, fulfilling the talent needs of LA’s growing entrepreneurial ecosystem. LAMCII seeks to bridge this gap by working with businesses, universities and city colleges to create the EdgeLA Fellowship program. The program will be a one-stop-shop to connect businesses looking for bright, well-educated talent with students looking for longevity and meaningful experiences. We are working with Internships.com, a local business, to build a platform that makes it easy to navigat

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You Can Compost That!
You Can Compost That! 15 Pink-talk-bubble-tail
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Our project would primarily benefit Los Angeles by reducing its environmental impacts. However, it would also produce positive outcomes for several other indicators included in the My LA2050 Challenge. Below is a list of just some of the benefits provided by our project: - Food waste composting will significantly reduce Los Angeles’ contribution to global greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. In addition, diverting food waste from landfills will help improve air quality in Los Angeles by reducing the vehicles miles traveled by waste haulers to landfills and lessening odors produced by the rotting of organic waste. - Providing affordable weekly food scrap pickup will help Los Angeles meet the State’s waste diversion requirement to divert at least 50% of waste from landfills after 2004. Existing landfill lifespans in the Los Angeles area would also be increased by composting. - Create jobs for Angelenos as we will need individuals to perform weekly pickup services in the various neighborhoods of Los Angeles - Setting up composting operations in our schools would allow them to reduce their waste management expenses, produce the fertilizer needed for their grounds, generate income by composting community food waste, and teach students important lessons in biology, ecology, agriculture, and sustainability. - Both residents and businesses of Los Angeles can potentially save money by reducing the amount of trash picked up by conventional haulers to be sent to landfills. Additionally, they will gain satisfaction from helping their local schools. - Increase environmental awareness within Los Angeles in general, particularly with regards to food wastefulness and global climate change - Organic farms will benefit from the incoming stream of compostable food waste provided by our service. The compost will be used to enhance or increase crop yield, completing the farm-to-table-to-farm circle.

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Porous Housing 2050: Housing Typology for DTLA in 2050
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Developing an affordable multi housing complex would contribute to revitalizing DTLA in various ways; provide housing opportunities for low income Angelinos, create work opportunities, give hope to skid row dwellers to find affordable housing, assist in restoring urban beauty, support pedestrian activity for downtown vibrancy, provide equal housing and equal opportunity by creating a homogenous community devoid of social class or ethnic schisms. We feel that if a housing typology serves as more than just a place of residence and advocates itself as social housing, it promotes a sense of community thereby insinuating self-resilience and sustainability. This allows all residents to engage as active members of the community who can socialize without biases. This is particularly important because characteristically the homeless population and low income groups tend to be isolated from mainstream society. While executing this process, there is more possibility to develop on the expansive function of housing such as advanced correlations between housing and sustainability, landscapes, urban-scapes, infrastructure which would foster further evolved typologies. Beyond generic housing complex, developing a new typology connected with public space, urban green space, or mixed-use would also serve as a catalyst to solve problems DTLA faces as urban collective housing which presently echoes a sense of reclusion from one another.

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Green Jobs in a Zero Waste LA
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<p>The exclusive franchise that meets our zero waste goals (all waste recycled, composted or otherwise processed) will create over 2,800 new jobs even while 80% of recycling is exported. With robust new infrastructure for recycling and remanufacturing that ends export of recycables, an additional 11,500 jobs can be added, building to nearly 50,000 jobs in these industries in LA by 2050. </p> <p>While this project can be a huge generator of jobs, if the region does not develop new recycling infrastructure, recycling/remanufacturing will continue to be exported overseas. Absent this change, within the next decade, an estimated 11,500 new manufacturing jobs will be lost— and we estimate that every job sent overseas could mean seven jobs in our region. For example, upon implementation of the exclusive franchise, if plastics and compost infrastructure is developed, it will immediately create 6,000 jobs that would otherwise go out of the country.</p> LAANE, Isidore and our other partners in this work will ensure that the jobs created in waste hauling, diversion and remanufacture pay family supporting wages, offer health care and are safe and green.</p> <p>E-waste is one of the most promising areas for job creation in recycling. Now, over 200,000 tons of e-waste end up in landfills annually, though it is toxic and illegal. The benefits of the proper stewardship of e-waste are considerable. Electronics can be de-manufactured for valuable materials such as titanium and platinum. Handled correctly, these increasingly rare commodities, along with other materials, can be remanufactured to benefit LA workers, industry and the community. </p> <p>LA will benefit from incubating manufacturing businesses that make new products out of high-volume recycled materials like compostable organics and plastics as the demand for high-quality compost from farmers and recycled plastic goods for remanufacture increases. The demand from residents and businesses that prefer products made of recycled materials will boost the economy. </p> <p>At the core of the issue is making sure we have high-quality materials for businesses that need them the most: processors and remanufacturers. By keeping a "closed-loop" on recycling, we ensure that we have more materials in the recycling stream, we can attract and incubate entire recycling supply chains, and we are able to create more jobs. Part of our research will include exploring promising new policy strategies including government procurement policies and tax incentives as a means of encouraging the expansion of this industry – one that already has created 128,000 jobs in California.</p> <p>The implementation of the exclusive franchise will not only lead to new job creation and the uplift of existing jobs, the project will include significant environmental benefits leading to a zero waste city, cleaner air due to newly required clean-fuel trucks, and streets that are safer and relieved of nuisance.</p>

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$1,000,000 in total grants
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Submission Began
Tuesday, February 26

Submission Ended
Thursday, March 28
at 12:00 PM PDT

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Voting Began
Tuesday, April 02

Voting Ended
Wednesday, April 17
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-3 Step3-title
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address

Winner Announced
Wednesday, May 08

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