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Ready, Set, Gold!: A Students' Guide to a Lifetime of Fitness
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RSG! has already benefited Los Angeles - see the results below in evaluating our project quantitatively and qualitatively. RSG! reaches approximately 500 students/school (500 x 50 schools = 25,000 annually). It serves as a continual reminder that the 42 Olympians/Paralympians participating in the program and ranging in age from 20 years old to 72 years old are healthy lifelong models for students in fighting the epidemics of diabetes and obesity because they are the examples of healthy living habits and not diabetic or obese. RSG! is a reminder of the pride people felt in 1984 when we held our second Olympics here in Los Angeles; as I travel throughout Los Angeles, those who were here in '84, always have a story to tell on their volunteering, going to an event, and no traffic! And now Mayor Villaraigosa has tossed our city hat into the ring to host another Olympics in 2024. Who wouldn't want another one after London's successfully hosting their third Olympics. And there's a young man or woman in school now who will be propelled to be an Olympian because of what is set down in LA at this time and become like Olympian David Brinton ('88--cycling) who was motivated by watching the Olympics when he was 9 years old or seeing Olympian Paul Gonzales ('84--Boxing) the first Mexican-American to win a Gold medal.

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GLOBALGIRL MEDIA HIVE NETWORK
GLOBALGIRL MEDIA HIVE NETWORK 8 Pink-talk-bubble-tail
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Anyone who lives in Los Angeles is aware of the glaring disparities between wealth, education and access, and how these schisms play out in the media. Girls in our target communities are grappling with a 45% high school dropout rate, gang and drug violence, high rates of teen pregnancy, and the overall challenges of growing up with limited resources. It doesn't help when they are also bombarded with highly sensationalistic reporting and negative stereotypes in film, television and music videos, rather than providing positive images and role-models. Being able to tell one’s own story and believe in one’s own voice is the beginning of being able to advocate for all forms of social justice. GGM believes its model of interactive, peer-based media training through which young women seek to exert both voice and influence on issues of public concern can lead to real systemic change. Our training provides a fun, connected, and personalized education experience that recognizes girls’ strengths in technology and media, areas where they don’t necessarily gravitate. This in turn helps them stay focused, stay in school, develop and demonstrate skills and abilities for jobs and economic development. The potential of increasing access for women and girls to new media technology is exponential. Once one young woman experiences the transformative benefits of the program, she often becomes a “transmitter” introducing others in her community to her ideas and work, creating a ripple effect of change. Girls who are feeling disconnected can start to feel “connected” throughout our hive network, seeking out mentors, apprenticeships and other GlobalGirls from across L.A. and other countries. What we are really doing is advocating for a girl-driven global “digital citizenship,” where girls harness social media for social change, sharing and transferring their new knowledge with other girls who interact internationally on our website, games, apps and blogs, who in turn build on that knowledge and remix it for their own needs, then pay it forward by sharing/resharing that knowledge. In contrast to our target area’s dropout rate, GGM graduates have a 100% high school enrollment/graduation rate and a 90% college enrollment rate. Further, 69% have continued to report for the L.A. bureau beyond their initial training. Girls who have taken our training talk about the power of connectivity, authorship and how making their own media gives them confidence to build brighter futures. In a recent Ted Talk, GlobalGirl Rocio Ortega said this: “GlobalGirl Media taught me for the first time the value of my own voice, I worked with Tebogo form South Africa, and although we have similar dreams and ambitions, we learn from our different experiences…I thought I was alone in my struggle with my father and my culture. My opportunity with GGM has helped me to speak my mind and express my ideas-- we’ve not only become global sisters, but advocates for change in our community…”

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The County Resident from District 3
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<p>The internet and 24/7 access to media and better information than ever will allow for a better informed citizenry, better suited to monitor its precious government resources. Corruption can never thrive in an environment where the sun is shining and the 'fresh-eyes' of the public are asking questions and getting answers. </p> <p>Scrutiny is teachable. </p> <p>Inspiring young and old to be more civically engaged through comedy and straight talk. </p>

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Transforming Lives, One Show at a Time
Transforming Lives, One Show at a Time
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By working in the greater Los Angeles community, on stage and in schools, using the medium of theatre, CRE Outreach confronts many challenges that at-risk youth and the disabled community face. Our work provides a constructive and creative forum for participants to bring issues to the forefront and let their voice be heard. Our programs actively engage the most under-served individuals to live better lives and empower them to successfully navigate through today’s society.

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Camp reLAte: A Community Organizing Approach to Cultivating Connectedness
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<p>For a sustainable Los Angeles in 2050, we know that we need greener buildings, a local food system, better education and a thriving economy. But we also know that these efforts require us to adapt our values and behaviors so that we can work together to maintain all those improved conditions and structures. Mostly change efforts succeed because people come together to create and maintain a shared vision because many different needs and interests shape their context. Even with initial success, sustaining long-term change is often difficult. Change is sustained by structure and culture. We need a culture of connectedness to serve as the glue that holds all the pieces of our common vision together. </p> <p>Creating culture happens through relationships—people engaging people in patterns of conversation, rituals and habits organized around shared values and stories. To ensure social connectedness for LA in 2050, Camp reLAte will inspire Angelenos to cultivate new patterns that prioritize relationships across our many different factors of diversity—economic status, neighborhood, faith, ethnicity, race, gender identity, sexual orientation, etc. We will organize one another into a healthy culture of connectedness through community-catalyzing leadership practices.</p>

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Everything, Everywhere: LA 2050
Everything, Everywhere: LA 2050 8 Pink-talk-bubble-tail
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Everything, Everywhere will benefit Los Angeles by: • Creating replicable examples of community initiated and supported projects that inspire creativity, participation and experimentation citywide. • Cultivating, strengthening and maintaining Los Angeles’s high percentage of working artists and arts professionals. • Providing access and exposure to a diverse range of grassroots cultural production.

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ENDLESS ORCHARD
ENDLESS ORCHARD 19 Pink-talk-bubble-tail
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This project is uniquely tied to Los Angeles by history. Much of the land on which the city is built was once citrus orchards, most of them razed over the last century for building sites. Almost the only trace that remains is in old postcards of endless orchards with a backdrop of snow-covered mountains, the vigorous fruit contrasting against the icy peaks. These cards fed the utopian dream of California, a bountiful place where you could live in beauty and comfort. <p> Fallen Fruit’s work has often alluded to this past, a way of holding on to a utopian impulse in the middle of our urban grit. It comes with echoes of democracy, the idea of a just world in which everyone is treated equally and everyone’s needs are accounted for. <p> California has a complicated history, from its first colonization by Spanish missionaries to the rancho system, where land tracts were given to favored people as rewards, and then the Homestead Act, which tried to democratize things. One of the ideas of old West we respect was to take care of strangers and passersby — in a world without infrastructure, all people had was each other. <p> Los Angeles is now bursting with infrastructure, and a lot of it doesn’t work. We have less public green space per square mile than New York City. The idea of the commons was never particularly Californian, but it’s rooted in human culture: a space that’s shared by all, not just to look at but to graze our animals and raise our food. The commons weren’t about ownership (which was shared) but about use: who could use the land and the things it gives us.<p> Fallen Fruit’s public art projects have really arisen in the context of Los Angeles and its strange mix of density and neglect. The public agrarian experiments we propose are uniquely suited to our climate — not just the weather but also the culture. Fruit is a great tool for socially-minded artists because it never exists in isolation. Someone grows it (often in California), someone picks it (often an underpaid migrant worker), and others prepare it, serve it, and then consume it. Our work strives to connect all these relationships in surprising ways.<p> None of the fruit commonly eaten today is native to California, though much of it is grown here. We work with that fact, and see the way a bunch of fruit hanging over the sidewalk in Alhambra is also an invitation. It’s a symbol of bounty and generosity. It’s an invitation to a stranger, perhaps to you.

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Can you imagine, a Los Angeles with a large system of parks, gardens, micro-spaces, plazitas, parklets, pedestrian walkways that lead to and from work, play and living spaces? By taking simple ideologies of space, connectivity and landscape, Los Angeles can become a beacon for urban environments around the country. We want the community to be involved in the planning and construction of greenspaces in their own neighborhoods, to make a deeper connection to their environment. The manual will provide communities with a guide for identifying greenspace opportunities and designing cost-effective solutions, and implementation which will help to see projects built in their communities much sooner than later. The purpose of the manual will be specifically designed for communities based on socio-economic conditions but can be used by any neighborhood throughout Los Angeles. As reported in the LA2050 report and several, recent scholarly studies, low-income, communities of color have the greatest need for access to greenspaces. The manual will take in mind specific land use opportunities or restrictions, culturally-sensitive relationships with space, and other unique community characteristics. With this framework, the manual will be able to be utilized and implemented in similar communities and cities throughout the country. By facilitating the process of creating the needed greenspace in multiple communities, the manual will directly benefit Los Angeles as a whole. These are grassroots playspaces, nature spaces, and contemplative spaces. With the implementation of these greenspaces Los Angeles will reap the benefits of planting trees and vegetation that sequester carbon emissions and improve air quality; designing permeable surfaces such as low/no mow grasses and porous paving will capture and clean stormwater; creating beautiful, clean greenspaces will spur economic investment; and providing areas where adults and youth can interact with the natural environment in their neighborhoods will create ample health and wellness opportunities by combating nature deficit disorder. In addition, the manual will create greenspaces that will revitalize neighborhoods: studies prove time and time again the more greenspace a community has, the higher the property values. The aesthetic appeal of the neighborhood due to the addition of greenspace will encourage investment into the neighborhood. <b>These will be greenspaces that will support communities to thrive, not just survive.</b>

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Backyard Homes: Sustainable, Flexible, Affordable Housing for LA
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Backyard Homes will benefit Los Angeles by making it more livable in three substantial ways. First it will improve our housing, by making it more affordable, more flexible, more sustainable, and more livable. According to a preliminary study by Stanford University engineers, compared to a typical house of the same size, the Backyard Home has a ten times to as much as a hundred times lower environmental impact. The simple construction system will make it possible to acquire a Backyard Home the way you might buy a car, will leave no foundation if and when it is disassembled, and will be adjusted or customized to each yard and household need. A family that needs more space can find it in their own backyard. A family that wants to reduce its mortgage payment can do so. A Backyard Home can provide a home office now, and become a caregiver apartment later. Second, it will improve neighborhoods. Now, when a family’s circumstances change, they often need to move to a new community where housing is cheaper, bigger, smaller, or in some way more suitable to their new needs. This creates neighborhoods in constant flux. Neighborhoods will have greater stability when people can stay in place through the various stages of their lives. Neighborhood stability has profound benefits for the residents, from improved quality of life, to improved educational outcomes, to improved health outcomes. In addition, Backyard Homes is a solution that can replace unwanted infill housing development such as large apartment buildings or condominiums that change neighborhoods in unwanted ways. Third, Backyard Homes will improve the city as a whole, by helping reduce sprawl, traffic, and greenhouse gas emissions. The innovative construction and design technology can set a new standard for housing in the city, demonstrating that Los Angeles can grow inward instead of outward, while at the same time growing more sustainably, more beautifully, and more affordably. In the same way that mid-century modernists championed a new form of home through technology and design in 50s-era LA, Backyard Homes can make Los Angeles more Angeleno for the twenty-first century.

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MADE by DWC: Education and Job Readiness for Homeless Women
MADE by DWC: Education and Job Readiness for Homeless Women 38 Pink-talk-bubble-tail
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DWC’s mission is to provide permanent supportive housing and a safe and healthy community fostering dignity, respect, and personal stability, and to advocate ending homelessness for women. Los Angeles is currently the homeless capital of the United States; the Los Angeles Homeless Services Agency’s 2011 count found more than 50,000 homeless individuals in LA County, with a high concentration of those individuals on Skid Row. One-third of these homeless individuals are adult women. Our Education and Job Readiness Program is a direct response to the service barriers and gaps that directly impact Los Angeles’ homeless and extremely low-income women. According to a 2010 Women's Needs Assessment, the Skid Row community has an extreme lack of accessible education and employment opportunities. Among women surveyed, 68.2% lacked a high school diploma or GED equivalent, and only 7.6% had college degrees, the lowest level since the survey’s creation in 2001. Nearly half (46.9%) lacked access to computer classes and/or internet, and 59.4% of women identified educational opportunities as a resource they would most like to see in local community and service centers. Of women surveyed, 90.3% did not believe there were employment opportunities available in the downtown area, and only 4.3% reported income from employment. Women in homelessness are often thrust into instability as a direct result of poor physical and/or mental health, disability, loss of employment, and familial loss, among other issues. As federal funding for affordable housing and social programs faces further cuts, we are investing efforts into providing women with practical skills and alternative income to increase their long-term independence. Our Education and Job Readiness Program will influence the personal wellness and stability of Los Angeles’ most underserved population, while also impacting the well-being of our local community on multiple levels. We will (1) increase direct access to job-training and employment services (2) ensure stabilization of our participants, assisting them in building skills and reentering the workforce, (3) reduce utilization and decrease dependency on high-cost emergency services, (4) mobilize the Los Angeles community through volunteerism and the shopping experience, and (5) improve the overall social, economic, and health outcomes on Skid Row. In addition to providing direct benefits to homeless women, DWC’s programs engage members of the greater Los Angeles community. Volunteers lead many of our SET to Create product-development workshops, offering both practical skills and mentorship to participants. Our two MADE by DWC stores bring in foot traffic and engage our neighbors in the local economy. Additionally, the MADE by DWC product line is offered through several locations across Los Angeles, including Bloomingdale’s in Century City, and several Hudson News locations at LAX, expanding the scope of our public education efforts.

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Youth Take Their Lives Off The Streets And Into Gardens
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Streets2Gardens program will benefit Los Angeles by bridging the gap between different communities on the issue of environmental neglect. The Streets2Gardens program will create and promote a garden curriculum that can be replicated in any school and individual home. The program will also show how youth have a tremendous amount of power in changing the circumstances of their communities. By putting soil, seeds and trees in the hands of our youth, and connecting them with their community in a positive way, they will become catalysts for systemic change in their environments. Streets2Gardens will begin by getting 10 youth off the streets and into gardens, creating and teaching a garden curriculum that will be engaging and powerful. Streets2Gardens will get result in different sections of Los Angeles County coming together to discuss how their environment affects them and how the gardens will begin to address a number of health and environmental issues. The two existing gardens and the two new gardens, plus trees to be planted at all four sites, will begin a trend that will result in improved health and air quality in the area. The gardens will harvest fruits and vegetables that can be eaten by the children at the school and/or their parents. With the curriculum that is going to be created and shared with the participating schools, the schools can encourage and teach the parents to plant their own fruit and vegetable gardens. The possibilities are endless.

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Climate Resolve: Inspiring LA to Prosper in a Changing Climate
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Using the LA2050 grant, Climate Resolve will help inform Los Angeles of the climate changes to come so that we can anticipate, prepare for, and reduce the impacts of climate change, while at the same time we help two of the most vulnerable communities in Los Angeles identify solutions and mobilize to take action to make their neighborhood better, stronger, and more resilient to climate change. But our vision extends well beyond the work we will do in 2013-2014. Climate Resolve will leverage our experience, successes, lessons learned, and new partnerships developed with the LA2050 seed funding to scale-up the process into a long-term, city-wide effort of coordinated community-based climate planning and engagement. Climate Resolve will be a “big tent” where non-profit organizations, businesses, civic leaders, and communities can convene to help one another prepare for climate change.

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Ballot Brief - Ground Game
Ballot Brief - Ground Game
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One of the downward indicators identified by the LA2050 report in the Social Connectedness arena is low voter turnout. Ground Game will address this challenge by honing in on the Los Angeles precincts with the lowest voter turnout and working to build civic engagement in these micro-neighborhoods. Initially we will focus on 6 to 10 of the worst precincts and launch a grass roots marketing campaign as described above, encourage people to express their frustrations, use the Ground Game website to link individuals to their elected officials, provide additional background information on the issue, and connect individuals to volunteer opportunities. By first focusing on a select number of the most disengaged precincts, we will refine our project methodology and build an engagement toolkit that can be replicated in other areas of the City. We are currently shifting through publically available, but difficult to decipher, information on each voting precinct in Los Angeles to determine the precincts most in need. The LA2050 Report also found low rates of volunteerism in the Social Connectedness category. Ground Game will directly address this issue by linking citizens with nonprofit and other community groups who are committed to solving specific issues in the community.

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AEP - Arts and Cultural Environmental Certification
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There are many benefits to adopting sustainable practices. At their museum, art gallery, theater or arts support organization, our member organizations save precious dollars through resource conservation that can be redirected toward fulfilling their missions. They increase productivity by creating a healthy workplace free of toxins and reduce their negative impact on our City and planet by reducing CO2 emissions, energy costs, material and water waste and set an important and visible example for their millions of audience and visitors to follow. In addition, the adoption of environmentally friendly business practices and attaining a city and state recognized Green Business Certification allows for positive marketing and outreach as well as an opportunity to grow a donor base to include those who champion environmentalism and earth conscious business practices. It’s a snowball effect. Our certification checklist and process has been vetted by the Santa Monica Office of Sustainability, the Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation, the National Resources Defense Council in Washington D.C. and by the Department of Toxic Substances Control in Sacramento, CA. the governing body that administers and approves all the green business programs operating in the State of California. The emergence of AEP's program has and will continue to have a demonstrably positive effect on the health and quality of life for millions of Angelenos every day and a dramatic multiplier effect for the Arts and cultural sector. By joining together hundreds of arts organizations of every aesthetic and type, in every community prosperous and financially challenged, urban and rural, we create a powerful constituency whose direct interaction with the general public can not be overstated. AEP is committed to strict and rigid data collection and will be publishing an annual Los Angeles Arts Environmental Report (LAAER) that details the members’ collective CO2 reductions, water and waste savings and other valuable information to demonstrate the actual impact of the program. This report and the positive actions of our members will have the beneficial outcome of positioning the arts sector as a leader in the emerging environmental field, making them even more attractive for private and public support.

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Fandango Obon Project / Proyecto Fandango Obon
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While our neighborhoods in many ways provide comfortable, safe havens, and especially for immigrant populations, there should exist friendly avenues to enter and exit, and meaningful opportunities to engage across them. Great Leap continues its commitment to use the arts to bridge cultural boundaries. Over our 35 years we have developed methodologies to provide people of diverse ethnicities, religions and other self-identifications with opportunities for deep and meaningful encounters. Important elements of Fandango-Obon are providing a compelling purpose for people to come together, and the creation of an affirming space for exploration and expression without judgment. It is an entrance to a place in time where music, dance, and connection with one’s ancestral traditions can be lived with pride. Our theater techniques, games and other facilitation frameworks help participants bond with people of other backgrounds, often for the first time. Once such a “barrier” is unlocked, it can be more easily be opened in future encounters across the city. We practice assertive outreach to ensure that our gatherings are not only cross-cultural, but also intergenerational, so that young people can learn from elders who may have deeper understanding from direct experience with their cultural heritage. Geographical dimensions of L. A. will be utilized in unique ways. The L.A. River separates Boyle Heights and Little Tokyo. Though only a short walk across a bridge, residents of the respective neighborhoods generally do not interact, other than in passing. Fandango-Obon will give impetus to cross the “bridge” – on foot, bicycle or via the metro. A workshop at the Nishi Hongwanji Temple just west of the 1st St. Bridge, will welcome a mainly Latino community into a Japanese American setting. Conversely, residents of Little Tokyo will travel the short distance to Boyle Heights to be welcomed by our workshop partner Building Healthy Communities. Additional cross-cultural engagements include a workshop at A Place Called Home (APCH) in South Los Angeles, bringing Japanese Americans to a center with mainly African American and Latino youth. APCH is located only 3 miles south of Little Tokyo down Central Avenue, an historic cultural Mecca of its own. Fandango-Obon will elevate awareness of Angelenos’ common histories within geographic proximity. For example, how many of us knew that Boyle Heights has had established Japanese and Jewish communities in the recent past? Mutual understanding can lower cultural barriers and help us “create a circle dance” that respects our uniqueness while building trust and stronger community relations. We see the potential for this project to change stereotypical perceptions that separate us. As our city and nation continues moving toward people of color being the majority, we want L.A. to stand out as a place where arts and culture are robust and accessible to all and are used in innovative ways to meet our challenges.

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Skid Row 2050
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The goal of the project is to create an inclusive and consensus-based model for healthy community development. We plan to develop policy suggestions and design possibilities of the built environment in Skid Row, transforming the lowest-income area of Los Angeles. Additionally, we want the existing population in Skid Row to have a vested interest in their community and increase a sense of ownership and buy-in for the area. <br/><br/> The ultimate goal of this project is to create a living product that creates an infrastructure for development and inclusion that fosters growth and transformation in the area. This community plan will raise awareness to a part of Los Angeles that has constantly been swept under the rug. This project will bring attention to a problem that is often marginalized and seen as someone else’s problem thus perpetuating the social injustice. By bringing homelessness and the lack of affordable housing to the forefront, we can begin a dialog that puts the most vulnerable at the center of the conversation. The Downtown Renaissance has never included Skid Row; this is an opportunity to make sure it does not continue to be left out of the conversation. <br/><br/> We aim to expand the dialog around the impact and possibilities of housing. Rather than just defined as a roof over one’s head, we hope to activate and push the performative aspects of housing. We want to redefine housing as intentional components of daily life that have been thoughtfully designed, developed, and operated. We strive to serve as an example of how housing and the built environment can transform lives and be an active part of the fabric and identity of Los Angeles.

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Roving Río Vista: A Park on the Move
Roving Río Vista: A Park on the Move 13 Pink-talk-bubble-tail
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<p>A Roving Rio Vista is just one component of a larger effort to make the L.A. River into a great Los Angeles civic space and outdoor destination. Our emerging Greenway 2020 campaign aims to make the entire L.A. River bike-able & walk-able by the year 2020. President Obama recognized the L.A. River as one of only two public spaces in California for his America's Great Outdoors initiative to champion conservation and recreation in the 21st century. A Roving Río Vista is just one of the many public amenities that could be along the L.A. River, encouraging civic engagement and connectivity.<p> Specifically, the proposed Roving Río Vista will: • Expand social connectedness and civic engagement by bringing people together in a common space • Increase community input on revitalizing the LA River – building healthy urban communities • Create active public space along the LA River • Promote the LA River Greenway 2020 campaign to create a continuous greenway for public benefit

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Teaching at South Gate Middle School for the past four years, our founder supported his students towards record-breaking mastery levels on the California Standards Tests. Now, the smartestk12 team wants to share the success with all Los Angeles county, and eventually the whole country as we all prepare to meet the digital assessment needs of the impending Common Core. There is no secret formula to improved success in the classroom, yet no one can argue in the power of data. Our goal is to make the data tracking process extremely easy and teacher-friendly. For LA county, this means that all 145,000 students PreK to grade 12 can be standards mapped using our website. Also, all teachers, parents, and administrators can be held accountable toward their growth. The current system requires us to wait until August to find out test scores. While the Common Core will be faster, we will only have data to act on by the end of the year, or at most 2-3 interim assessments. Now, with smartestk12, any student can practice every day of the year; and on every subject, including essays. With this much information, our city can eliminate students falling through the cracks, because we will know performance almost instantly. In LA, 1 in 4 students drop out because we did not help them in time, and often we did not know where to help them academically. Likewise, 3 of 5 students do not finish college prep requirements because we push them forward to the next level regardless of any true level of mastery. With a computer adaptive system, a student in one seat can be practicing in calculus and the student in the other can be working on basic number skills. Yet, in each program, the student will be receiving content perfectly suited for their needs and the teachers, parents and administrators involved will be 100% aware of those needs. We can now provide accountability before the end of the year, meaning that LA schools can actually hold data to a teacher or student. And finally, professional development will match the needs of the teachers, because there will be no hiding from intervention needs. LAUSD's chromebook push: While at LAUSD, our founder built smartestk12 and had a 3-year average Academic Growth over Time rating of 5.6 out of 5, placing him in the top 1% in his subject. This means that his students grew far beyond their expected levels, adjusted by previous scores, ELL status, socioeconomic status, etc. However, beyond the adjusted growth, his students showed real performance levels in the top of the city, with over 100 students scoring at the highest level (Advanced), annually. When a system works, it enables critical thinking and more time on quality instruction and meaningful programs for kids. Smartestk12 will intimately work with LA's schools. Currently, several have agreed or have shown deep interest in completing Beta Testing this fall, including various LAUSD schools, KIPP LA schools, the UCLA Lab School and the DaVinci Schools.

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One Day in Los Angeles
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One Day in Los Angeles will benefit L.A. by providing a participatory, cause-based media creation event related to civic and social engagement. The event will produce residual benefits across many fields, as local filmmakers will be asked to document hindrances to human development across greater Los Angeles. The archive will provide access to firsthand experiences, giving a first-hand view of the issues that face Los Angeles and, ultimately, an opportunity to create more informed solutions. The undeniable power of seeing the diversity of the Los Angeles experience through a single day enriches the perspective of who we are, interconnecting both our joys and struggles. One Day on Earth has over 100 nonprofit partners. Our staff will engage partner organizations as well as build new relationships with local nonprofits specifically for this initiative. By working with local community organizers our producers will draw attention to real frontline issues. One Day in Los Angeles will present an opportunity for local nonprofits to generate media to communicate their mission and to rally support for their cause. In addition to nonprofit outreach, our staff will focus efforts on inspiring students and educators to participate. Preparing young people to effectively communicate through digital media is a critical tool in expanding civic and social engagement. As with previous One Day on Earth initiatives, One Day in Los Angeles will inspire volunteerism around the issues that matter most to Los Angeles. With the filming event yielding hundreds of hours of media, the geo-tagged archive will be searchable by location, keyword, and subject matter. This robust video resource will be a useful tool for local policymakers, community organizers, and educators to reference and support greater insight into both high-priority local issues and cultural diversity.

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Virtual Mentor Program for Foster and At-risk Youth
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Virtual mentors can help foster youth enter and complete college, and as indicated in the LA2050 challenge, better education can increase prospects and participation in community life in all areas of the LA2050 challenge, creating better citizens and a better city. A myriad of resources exist to support my assumptions about the potential benefits of providing mentors to youth who lack the support and guidance of a stable family. M.R. Munson et al. found that “older youth exiting foster care value having someone that maintains contact, stays by their side, and is simply there for them” (Munson & McMillen, 2009). Samuels and Pryce found that young adults more often seek instrumental forms of support, such as help with housing, but that their pride may hinder them from asking for emotional support (Griffin et al., 2011; Samuels, 2008). Data from this study revealed that both of these forms of support were perceived by the foster youth as valuable. Leadbeater & Way’s study on young adults reported that they often want another person in their lives that will hold them accountable and set limits (Leadbeater & Way, 2001). Finally, the National Mentoring Partnership (2004) found that an online mentoring program taking place between 2002-2004 “bolstered mentees' self-esteem, literacy and future orientation.” Why virtual mentors? There are two main reasons. First, in reading the existing literature about the most established face-to-face mentoring programs, and surveying adult peers about their potential willingness to be a mentor, it seems that one of the main impediments to peoples’ willingness to be a mentor is the expectation that the mentor commit to a regularly-scheduled, minimum amount of time spent with the mentee, not including travel time and having to juggle unexpected conflicts and the vagaries of today’s overcrowded lifestyles. This seems to be a commitment that may feel overwhelming for the average bright, accomplished, busy individual who could probably REALLY help a youth navigate the complexities of his or her own life if the volunteer had the flexibility to make this commitment fit within his or her own set of obligations. Indeed I myself have always wanted to be a mentor or big sister but have always hesitated when trying to imagine myself fighting traffic to get to East LA by a certain time to meet a vulnerable kid waiting and wondering if I am going to show up and then there is an accident on the freeway and one of my kids’ schools calls to inform me that a kid is sick, etc… The second reason virtual mentoring makes sense is that today’s youth are potentially as or more comfortable with online communication as they are face-to-face communication. Additionally, given that many foster youth have issues of trust and attachment, a virtual relationship may feel safer and less overwhelming than a traditional face-to-face relationship with a stranger who looks like the many other adults who may have already disappointed a mentee.

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$1,000,000 in total grants
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Submission Began
Tuesday, February 26

Submission Ended
Thursday, March 28
at 12:00 PM PDT

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Voting Began
Tuesday, April 02

Voting Ended
Wednesday, April 17
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-3 Step3-title
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address

Winner Announced
Wednesday, May 08

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