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EMA PLAY:  Dance, Create, Think, Make the Future
EMA PLAY: Dance, Create, Think, Make the Future
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Los Angeles will benefit by having a culturally diverse event that they can attend for free. Los Angeles based chosen artists will benefit from being showcased. Some downtown (mainly restaurant and club) businesses will benefit from increased business. The City of Los Angeles will benefit from having a cultural event that will inspire attending Angelenos to participate in our future. All showcased artists and vendors will be LA based.

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Teaching at South Gate Middle School for the past four years, our founder supported his students towards record-breaking mastery levels on the California Standards Tests. Now, the smartestk12 team wants to share the success with all Los Angeles county, and eventually the whole country as we all prepare to meet the digital assessment needs of the impending Common Core. There is no secret formula to improved success in the classroom, yet no one can argue in the power of data. Our goal is to make the data tracking process extremely easy and teacher-friendly. For LA county, this means that all 145,000 students PreK to grade 12 can be standards mapped using our website. Also, all teachers, parents, and administrators can be held accountable toward their growth. The current system requires us to wait until August to find out test scores. While the Common Core will be faster, we will only have data to act on by the end of the year, or at most 2-3 interim assessments. Now, with smartestk12, any student can practice every day of the year; and on every subject, including essays. With this much information, our city can eliminate students falling through the cracks, because we will know performance almost instantly. In LA, 1 in 4 students drop out because we did not help them in time, and often we did not know where to help them academically. Likewise, 3 of 5 students do not finish college prep requirements because we push them forward to the next level regardless of any true level of mastery. With a computer adaptive system, a student in one seat can be practicing in calculus and the student in the other can be working on basic number skills. Yet, in each program, the student will be receiving content perfectly suited for their needs and the teachers, parents and administrators involved will be 100% aware of those needs. We can now provide accountability before the end of the year, meaning that LA schools can actually hold data to a teacher or student. And finally, professional development will match the needs of the teachers, because there will be no hiding from intervention needs. LAUSD's chromebook push: While at LAUSD, our founder built smartestk12 and had a 3-year average Academic Growth over Time rating of 5.6 out of 5, placing him in the top 1% in his subject. This means that his students grew far beyond their expected levels, adjusted by previous scores, ELL status, socioeconomic status, etc. However, beyond the adjusted growth, his students showed real performance levels in the top of the city, with over 100 students scoring at the highest level (Advanced), annually. When a system works, it enables critical thinking and more time on quality instruction and meaningful programs for kids. Smartestk12 will intimately work with LA's schools. Currently, several have agreed or have shown deep interest in completing Beta Testing this fall, including various LAUSD schools, KIPP LA schools, the UCLA Lab School and the DaVinci Schools.

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The Los Angeles Giant Harp Project
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The Giant Harp Project is extremely unique. It celebrates the temporal transformation of Los Angeles architecture, along with providing world class entertainment for free. This project makes arts education accessible to all through workshops designed to engage multiple communities regardless of their age and physical or mental abilities. Because String Theory has been celebrated by the finest venues of LA, the city has already embraced the phenomena of the Giant Harp. However, it has not been accessible to people without the means to buy tickets to the shows. Artists for Literacy and String Theory are excited to partner with Los Angeles in pioneering the effort to bridge the gap between artists and audience. Without compromising artistic integrity, The Giant Harp Project, believes that the integration of work created by the public (via our workshops) can fortify the actual performance of String Theory and honor the collaborative potential between artist and audience. At its core, this process is about engagement and discovery by both the artists and audiences at a profound level. We also believe that the Giant Harp Project is coming at a time when LA is going through tremendous transformations at the community level. When choosing the 3 neighborhoods for our residencies in 2013, we have the opportunity to lend a hand to community stakeholders who are ushering in these changes. For example, the 6th Street Viaduct / Bridge project won’t begin until 2015. The Boyle heights communities impacted by the project have a 100 year history of the bridge to celebrate before it’s torn down. Our Giant Harp Project can speak to that legacy on several levels and also serve a community that is in dire need of an arts infusion. Another location that is compelling to us is the 5 mile radius of the Magnolia Place Community Initiative. They are engaging more than 70 county, city and community organization to bring over 5000 families a comprehensive health and education overhaul. Their innovative coalition has room for a residency like ours to invigoration the public’s excitement and participation around this initiative. Our residency will include grassroots outreach into the communities before hand so that we don’t just come and go without making a true and lasting impact. As proof of concept, Artists for Literacy was funded by the California State Library in 2005 to do a similar project, not with art, but with the celebration of free literacy projects. The advocacy campaign was very successful and those best practices will be used for this project. We also believe in the serendipity of being exposed to the arts and what transforms in people. The Giant Harp Project is designed to inspire the inner artist in everybody. Over the past 10 years, String Theory has proven this theory to be true. Countless people who have participated in our workshops have embraced and accessed an artistic part of themselves.

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PARK-IN-A-BOX
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Los Angeles has many park-poor neighborhoods and many communities have limited access to usable open space. Obesity levels are high, caused in part by lack of access to active spaces and programs. Park-in-a-Box, with partner organizations, will provide access to underutilized space in underserved neighborhoods, and provide the ingredients necessary for lively and useable open spaces. Through this new model, Park-in-a-Box hopes to draw attention to the need for public spaces within these communities and encourage Angelinos to re-evaluate how we think about public space in our city. Please visit www.park-in-a-box.la for more information about how Park-in-a-Box works (more images after the jump).

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ThrdPlace benefits Los Angeles by telling the story of its identity and connecting the diverse stakeholders that live within and contribute to it. Los Angeles is a metropolis that represents many, different communities. Angelenos live in Hollywood because they identify with the people that live, work and play in Hollywood. The same can be said about Venice Beach. Angelenos invest in the metropolis with their vote, taxes and consumption. Our Governing bodies allocate of those limited funds by prioritizing the needs of the metropolis with the needs of the individual communities. But, Angelenos also invest socially. They invest in the long-term growth of communities as they build homes, patron local businesses, be-friend neighbors and leisure in public parks. We need and want to be part of developing our communities. thrdPlace is the platform that enables each and every Angeleno to tell his or her own story, mobilize the resources around them, and be part of developing their community. The story of D’Artagnan Scorza of Inglewood is not unlike many Angelenos. Over the years, D’Artagnan has witnessed a lack of development in his community. The City and businesses were not investing and long-term residents were moving away. As he looked around Inglewood, he could see dozens of outdoor, black-top basketball courts remain empty throughout the day and at night serve as a hub for criminal activity. The courts that were built as a recreational space and a community asset now served as a liability. Instead of giving over the identity of Inglewood to criminals, D’Artagnan decided not to move away but to invest in his community. To do this, D’Artagnan and his Non Profit, Social Justice Learning Institute, began to build urban gardens. D’Artagnan rallied his community to build an urban garden on top of one of the courts. As a result, the community now has a garden built by its community members, outfitted by For Profits and maintained by his Non Profit. The garden provides local residents free access to fresh, organic food. Because of D’Artagnan’s investment in his community, he changed the identity of his local park. Social Justice Learning Institute is now using thrdPlace for their 100 Seeds of Change Campaign. The goal of this initiative is to transform Inglewood into a healthy living community by empowering residents to grow their own food in a collaborative, local network. The comprehensive, citywide plan enlists community members – particularly, local youths – to create 100 urban gardens located at Inglewood homes, schools and parks. D’Artagnan is an example of one Angeleno. His actions can and are being replicated across our city. With thrdPlace, all those micro-movements can connect and together develop our city to be a true reflection of its citizens.

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OUT THE WINDOW: Videos on LA buses
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Out the Windows will benefit Los Angeles beyond its impact for “Arts and Cultural Vitality”. By using the indicator that is performing well, art in the public sphere, Out the Window will assist four other of LA 2050’s key indicators. Health: Perhaps one of the most pressing issues facing bus riders is health access, a key issue being addressed in this proposal. One in five Californians are uninsured, and in many districts of Los Angeles this number is even higher. Out the Window will provide Angelinos with key information about specific health issues and means to address them including motivation and methods to access insurance and enroll in the Affordable Care Act/California Exchange. Environment: With so much of our current health inextricably tied to environmental issues, the art of Out the Window will impact this key indicator with informative videos geared to individuals’ efforts, showing what can we do to improve and protect our environs. Social Connectedness: Los Angeles’ social connectedness will be enhanced through the public exhibition and the interactive aspects of the project. The project will create opportunities for bus riders to engage with each other, local organizations, students and artists by responding to the videos. It will also inevitably incite dialogue with other bus riders, their neighbors, communities, etc. Education: Out the Window will create a more informed, curious and motivated art-making and consuming public. Students who can publicly display their labors will more likely continue making videos. From this increased visibility, a percentage will find the inspiration to utilize the ever-growing means of creating video, encouraging a new generation of video makers, writers, animators etc. to advance the aesthetic and social power of communication in an era of social media. We have already commissioned the following notable artists: • Mel Chin, world renowned artist, to address lead prevention in L.A. • Yoshua Okon to examine food industry and childhood obesity • Poli Marisol to explore mental health in relation to food consumption • Lisa Marr and Paolo Davanzo to look at diverse culture’s health practices • John Jota Leanos to describe environmental justice • Ann Kaneko to show the visible and invisible benefits of Chi Gong

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Improve The Quality of Life Through Education and Community Support
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OUR PROGRAMS BRIGHT FUTURES SCHOLARS LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM The Program extends itself to all targeted high achieving (3.0 GPA) students, including low-income students completing high school against insurmountable odds. The goal is to provide these young people with the tools necessary to quest for success. A vital component in this program provides "group mentoring" as well as "individual mentoring"from our communities finest. Committed mentors include congressman, senators, assembly members, mayors, county supervisors, physicians, clergy, corporate CEO's, attorneys, scientists, engineers, artists, educators, law enforcement officials, managers and administrators. Bright Futures Scholars participate as Junior Council Persons (representing their mentors and schools all over the nation). Monthly Scholars television tapings are aired on Public Access Television, and can also be viewed online all around the world. HEALTHY, WEALTHY & WISE A multi-cultural health program geared to youth (of all ages) and families. The program further extends itself to addressing health issues and concerns of at-risk and low-income youth and families. Health education, at all levels, is provided to assist in maintaining healthy living and positive life choices. SMOOTHING THE ROUGH EDGES "UNVEILING THE JEWELS WITHIN" A pre-training, pre-screening program designed to target individuals' ages 14-25 that need assistance in polishing  employment,, personal adjustment, professional and marketability skills. Participants are prepared to be competitive in corporate America. STARS FOR STRIKES A second chance program that allows juvenile first offenders an opportunity to turn their lives around. Juveniles, referred into the program from the Juvenile Justice System are given an opportunity to redeem themselves, build self-esteem, and develop character while learning to make positive life choices. ART FROM THE HEART A program in which children are able to express them selves through their passions in art be in visual arts or audible. Through painting, photography, or other visual arts or through the audible art of playing an instrument the children learn to release their emotions in a safe and productive format.

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PLUNGE into the waters of the LA River
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Our project will : 1. Provide a space for informal gathering and recreation in Elysian Valley community. 2. Opportunity for the local community to host and directly involve in the numerous planning initiatives around LA River development. 3. Signature art with environmental benefits that will draw the general public to the river and encourage dialog. 4. Direct improvement to watershed by segregation and release of up to 30,000 gallons of storm water v. release over dirty streets and work areas. 5. Incubate ideas of community members, design professionals and artists. 6. Allow experimentation with novel ways to handle waters in terms of landscape design. 7. Allow experimentation /investigation of control technologies for large urban cisterns. 8. Be FUN.

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California Calls’ voter engagement program will help to reclaim the democratic process that now belongs to special interests, lobbyists and campaign committees. We encourage low-income voters to exercise their democratic right to vote with stunning success. The simple reason is that our “messengers”—the volunteers and team members who reach out to voters—are peers. Through the community-based organizations which operate these programs, young, bi-lingual people of color serve as door-to-door canvassers and phone bankers who talk to voters. They establish a rapport that earns the trust of skeptical voters. By engaging voters consistently in understanding crucial public policy issues (not only during election cycles), the California Calls model of voter engagement will produce several direct benefits: a. Advance Policies to Benefit Low-Income People: Our member organizations (see below) have outstanding track records winning significant benefits for low-income communities throughout Los Angeles, including: • reducing the number of nuisance liquor stores and transient motels; • assuring that all high schools offer college-prep courses and adequate college counselors; • negotiating with large companies—like Dreamworks—to provide jobs and apprenticeship training for inner city youth; • designing an energy conservation program for publicly-owned buildings that trains inner city youth in “green” construction; • creating programs for homeowners to avoid foreclosure and stay in their homes • closing toxic and harmful factories next to schools The proposed voter outreach program will enable all four community organizations to identify and recruit local residents to become involved in ongoing campaigns and to develop their leadership skills. b. Increase Voter Turnout so LA’s Electorate Reflects Our Population: The California Call’s model of civic engagement targets new and occasional voters in low-income Latino, African-American and immigrant neighborhoods. By increasing the voting participation rate of these residents, our program will help to insure that policies and candidates will more closely reflect the views and desires of residents of Los Angeles—the true meaning of democracy. Especially in local elections where turnout rates are historically low, this program can create a tipping point for greater representation of low-income communities. c. Create Accountability for Elected Representatives through an Informed Citizenry California Calls will increase accountability and transparency of elected representatives by creating a more informed and engaged citizenry. Our Telephone Town Halls will provide voters with the opportunity to hear directly—and engage directly—with the City’s new Mayor, new City Council members and other elected officials. The ongoing education and discussion through door-to-door canvassing and high-capacity phone outreach will increase the level of voter understanding on key issues.

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Peace to Prosperity
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Our CIS GAMES FOR PEACE project would benefit Los Angeles in a number of ways. Specifically, our CIS GAMES FOR PEACE participants come from communities with some of the lowest income and high crime areas in Los Angeles’ San Fernando Valley. They face a relentless assault of negative influences that often result in drug abuse, violence, teen pregnancy, poor academic performance, even death. By participating in CIS GAMES FOR PEACE, youth and young adults will develop the skills, abilities, relationships and associations necessary to foster self-esteem, persistence, perseverance and positive attitudes to overcome negative influences. Next, the project follows evidence-based models already proven to be effective. Two significant studies, Yin (1986) and Spergel (1989) evaluated strategies typically used to deal with gangs and delinquency. Both studies found that the most effective were: • Community Organization- comprehensive interagency cooperation and community cohesion among grass roots organizations, law enforcement agencies along with job development • Providing Alternative Opportunities-other activities such as sports, recreation, youth service, job training and placement CIS services and our Wrap-around service delivery strategy are in line with the “Spergel Model” and incorporate all elements of the model. Our special connection with youth and sports has been long, consistent and one of the most highly successful elements of the public safety methodology. The 252 baseball, softball, football, basketball and soccer games and tournaments that CIS has conducted have been highly effective tools in enhancing communication, reducing violence and improving the quality of life for all members of the community. The LA Times February 20, 1994 praised the football game that marked the 110th day of the Valley Unity Peace Treaty. Since then, scores of newspaper articles have documented the importance of these sporting events in helping youth avoid gangs and violence. In 2004, CIS hosted the first ever softball game between LA County Probation Gang Unit Officers and former/current gang members to enhance communication and improve relationships. In August 2005, CIS in partnership with the LAPD, hosted the 5th Annual LAPD Celebrity Swing-A-Thon. The most significant and fundamental benefit to LA is that youth and individuals formally considered as “throw-away” are re-energized with hope and can contribute positively to our society. These are individuals that others have “given up on” and who have been called the “lepers” of society. They are gang-involved or gang oriented youth and young adults who, despite their past behaviors, have demonstrated a sincere willingness to turn their lives around and become productive members of society. LA or any city and community can benefit when souls, spirits and minds are uplifted and redirected toward positive action.

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Climate Resolve: Inspiring LA to Prosper in a Changing Climate
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Using the LA2050 grant, Climate Resolve will help inform Los Angeles of the climate changes to come so that we can anticipate, prepare for, and reduce the impacts of climate change, while at the same time we help two of the most vulnerable communities in Los Angeles identify solutions and mobilize to take action to make their neighborhood better, stronger, and more resilient to climate change. But our vision extends well beyond the work we will do in 2013-2014. Climate Resolve will leverage our experience, successes, lessons learned, and new partnerships developed with the LA2050 seed funding to scale-up the process into a long-term, city-wide effort of coordinated community-based climate planning and engagement. Climate Resolve will be a “big tent” where non-profit organizations, businesses, civic leaders, and communities can convene to help one another prepare for climate change.

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LA Civic Engagement Lab
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Our overarching goal is to use this integrated ideation, prototype and deployment process to significantly change citizen interactions with each other and government in ways that deepen people's connection to and investment in Los Angeles communities. Over 500 volunteer hours will be dedicated to the NDCH, through participation in the day long event. This project will give those who might not traditionally volunteer an opportunity to use their skills as community organizers, designers, developers, or subject matter experts, to contribute to improving the future of Los Angeles. By partnering with local community organizations, we also hope to attract populations who are distrustful of Los Angeles’ government, or who have had no previous exposure to the inner workings of local government. These might include undocumented immigrants, formerly incarcerated people, youth, low-income people, non-native English speakers, and minorities. Engaging these communities in the process of government, providing them with contacts at City Hall, and ensuring that government services are directed toward these groups is vitally important for a city that continues to struggle with enormous racial and economic divides, and in which many residents harbor deep resentment toward local government agencies. In addition to volunteering, the participants will leave the event with new connections and relationships with other community members, and those connections will be nurtured through the prototyping workshops, where teams that formed during the NDCH will continue to meet, collaborate, and create together. The ideas discussed and prototyped during from the NDCH will be geared toward social connectedness, producing greater involvement in the community by residents. This, in turn, will lead to community input at City Hall that is more representative than what is typically received, resulting in solutions that respond more directly to community needs. But we also expect that relationships formed during the process of Civic Lab will be valuable to participants as they seek to establish networks that can later assist in everything from public safety to childcare to finding a job. By bringing diverse groups of people together, the Civic Lab will create bonds that strengthen neighborhoods and promote the health and well-being of its residents. Additionally, the CCIP aims to have a longer-term impact beyond the region, both in California and nationally, by creating a documented set of practices that other regions can use to come together across cities and sectors in an effort to foster more engaged communities. This will establish Los Angeles as a leader in the space of civic innovation, instilling pride in residents and the local governments that serve them, and encouraging further collaboration between the two.

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Transforming Los Angeles Schools Using the Parent Trigger Law
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<p>For far too long, meaningful power in regards to education policy has essentially rested in the hands of distant school district management and teachers unions. This has led to policies that far too often make little or no sense for children trapped in Los Angeles’ failing schools. </p> <p>We believe that fundamentally altering that power structure by introducing parents as real power players in a strategic way is the best way towards transformative policy change in public education, and each one of our strategies and tactics are geared towards accomplishing that endgame.</p> <p>As we build a cadre of strong parent chapters across Los Angeles fighting for reforms at their children’s low-performing schools, we will simultaneously begin focusing on translating those chapters into a city-wide movement for kids-first reforms in adult and school accountability, teacher effectiveness, college readiness, and other important areas.</p> <p>The first step in that process is to build strong horizontal relationships between our different chapters based on shared experiences and similar roadblocks they encounter in their Parent Trigger campaign efforts.</p> <p>We are certain that as our Parents Union Chapters launch in-district Parent Trigger efforts at their individual schools, other chapters across Los Angeles will consistently come up against similar roadblocks that are out of the hands of their local administrators or even their school district – state rules that force layoffs based only on seniority or that prohibit meaningful accountability by immediately granting teachers tenure after only two years.</p< <p>We will be actively and constantly seizing on these opportunities to channel parents’ frustrations up to district-wide and statewide advocacy efforts, which will serve as a key facilitator of our parent empowerment movement building efforts. </p> <p>All the while, however, we work to build horizontal relationships between the different chapters to create advocacy alliances based on common problems they are encountering at their schools. We thus very intentionally will use these chapters to build a local movement to advocate for key policy reforms on the district level always providing the type of sophisticated advocacy tools that are crucial for success by supplementing this grassroots movement with our organization’s proven skill sets in media, politics, and law. </p> <p>This philosophy guides our approach, which uses the Parent Trigger in partnership with sophisticated community organizing techniques to build a powerful, parent-based, movement for education policy that puts kids first. </p> <p>Thousands of children that are trapped in Los Angeles’ low-performing schools will become lifetime beneficiaries of this approach to education reform.</p>

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THE i.am.angel EAST L.A. INCUBATOR PROJECT
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An East LA incubator project will benefit ALL of Los Angeles, not just the east side. Here’s WHY: - Our incubator program creates a better overall startup ecosystem for the entire city of Los Angeles, by creating a LARGER and more DIVERSE pool of entrepreneurial talent. The future needs solutions that involve EVERYONE. - Our incubator program will foster entrepreneurship in struggling communities that are often burdened with crime, violence, and unemployment. By providing education and opportunity, we will enable people to start successful legitimate businesses, or gain the high-demand and high-paying skills needed to work in tech, rather than doing illegal things. This has a halo effect on so many other factors. Not only could it boost the local economy, creating jobs for local young people, but they will also be more likely to stay in the neighborhoods and continue to improve them. It could reduce crime and violence, and increase safety in these struggling neighborhoods and surrounding areas. The East LA incubator program can serve as a model for other similar communities around the world. - Our incubator program will give seed funding, supporting the creation of startups that provide value to the local community, especially those focusing on social good. Our project could be funding the future hottest LA startups promoting arts & cultural vitality, education, environmental quality, health, housing, income & employment, public safety, and social connectedness.

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Asphalt to Apples: Sprouting Healthy Kids and Gardens
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It’s a well examined and researched fact that the overall health of children in Los Angeles is poor, with children as young as age 3 suffering from pre-diabetic symptoms. While childhood obesity rates have leveled off in Los Angeles, they continue to be high, with Latino and African American children experiencing disproportionate effects of obesity and related health impacts, due to many factors such as income, housing and food insecurity as well as low access to healthy food with high exposure to calorie and chemical laden junk food. Children in L.A. and around the country are currently so unhealthy that their life expectancy is projected to be lower than that of their parents. Research on school gardens has shown that children eat more fresh fruits and vegetables, perform better on tests, and are more likely to have higher attendance rates when they experience gardening at school. In addition, gardens have been shown to increase children’s sense of ownership and pride of their accomplishments, an essential step toward taking control of their own health. As part of the regular school day, gardens provide a rich experience that improves both the capacity for learning and the ability to make healthy, informed decisions about their diets - and lives. Even children as young as age 2 can garden and benefit from such experiential activities. Farm to Preschool has found that children as young as 4 are asking their parents to buy and grow the foods they’ve eaten and grown themselves at school, something repeated in the feedback Garden School Foundation staff receive about the 6-11 year olds in their program. By inspiring, creating and sustaining a culture of gardens at schools, children, their families and their teachers will all benefit. Benefits are numerous and include (1) greater access to healthy foods; (2) increased consumption of healthy foods; (3) increased learning in all subjects and core standards; (4) skill building through the act of sowing, growing, harvesting and cooking food, as well as mentoring of older children to the young; (5) improved connection to and understanding of the environment that we live in; (6) more visually appealing schools that enhance learning and behavior; (7) a culture of connectedness to our land and each other by bringing schools and the community together; and certainly (8) the culminating effect of improved health outcomes for children as well as their families for generations.

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High School Students Shape the Future of Los Angeles
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Our project will benefit Los Angeles in a variety of ways. • CityLife students-as-adults will know how to access “City Hall” and the planning process in order to provide input into the urban planning process. • Because CityLife students will understand the importance of the arts and their role in building and maintaining strong communities, they will support and protect various arts projects in their communities as well as throughout the city. • CityLife students will “spread the word,” reaching out to and working with students in neighboring communities. • CityLife students will become well educated citizens of the future, which according to the LA2050 Report, is the first step toward improving the City. • CityLife students will learn about a whole range of career possibilities in urban planning, politics and government, and related fields such as urban planning, architecture, law (land use…), environmental engineering, the arts and more. • Perhaps some CityLife students-as-adults will run for office and become public servants. • CityLife students will help improve the quality of their neighborhoods and communities through bottom-up rather than top-down policies, planning and activities. Each time one neighborhood improves, it has a positive impact on the surrounding neighborhoods. • CityLife projects and murals will bring information, interaction, beauty, whimsy and art to the community. • CityLife alums will model their varied and innovative ways of seeing, thinking and acting.

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Porous Housing 2050: Housing Typology for DTLA in 2050
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Developing an affordable multi housing complex would contribute to revitalizing DTLA in various ways; provide housing opportunities for low income Angelinos, create work opportunities, give hope to skid row dwellers to find affordable housing, assist in restoring urban beauty, support pedestrian activity for downtown vibrancy, provide equal housing and equal opportunity by creating a homogenous community devoid of social class or ethnic schisms. We feel that if a housing typology serves as more than just a place of residence and advocates itself as social housing, it promotes a sense of community thereby insinuating self-resilience and sustainability. This allows all residents to engage as active members of the community who can socialize without biases. This is particularly important because characteristically the homeless population and low income groups tend to be isolated from mainstream society. While executing this process, there is more possibility to develop on the expansive function of housing such as advanced correlations between housing and sustainability, landscapes, urban-scapes, infrastructure which would foster further evolved typologies. Beyond generic housing complex, developing a new typology connected with public space, urban green space, or mixed-use would also serve as a catalyst to solve problems DTLA faces as urban collective housing which presently echoes a sense of reclusion from one another.

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Communities In Schools of Los Angeles: A Vision of 100% Graduation in LAUSD
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In 2012, Communities In Schools commissioned a national economic impact study to quantify its economic and social returns to society through a rigorous third-party investment analysis. Conducted by EMSI, one of the nation’s leading economic modeling firms, the study found that every dollar invested in Communities In Schools of Los Angeles generates $38.00 in economic benefit for the community. Students who earn a high school diploma have been shown to earn over $300,000 more over the course of their lifetime than peers who drop out. Businesses benefit by having a more skilled and productive workforce, taxpayers benefit through a broadening tax base, and the public generally benefits from reduced social costs attributed to dropping out of high school, such as crime and unemployment. Despite LAUSD’s 64.2% graduation rate, in 2012 96% of CIS of Los Angeles students graduated on-time from high school. The benefits to our community are much more than merely subjective. What does all of this mean? A $100,000 grant from the Goldhirsh Foundation through LA2050 would result in $3,800,000 in economic benefits to Los Angeles.

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Market Makeovers: NextGen Leaders
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East L.A. and Boyle Heights, like many under-resourced neighborhoods, have had their fair share of solutions presented to them by experts, usually from outside their communities. Some of them get implemented. Of those, few are implemented long enough and with adequate resources to take root, to become part of the fabric of the community it serves such that members of that community claim it as their own. The issues around the East LA + Boyle Heights food landscape and poor health outcomes among its predominantly Latino residents are serious and unhealthy food behaviors deeply entrenched. According to the L.A. County Department of Public Health, its population suffers high rates of obesity-related chronic diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and stroke. It has some of the highest rates of childhood obesity (32.2%) in the county. The situation will not change overnight. Because NextGen Leaders are from the community, their fellow community members are more likely to listen to what they have to say. Their actions on behalf of their neighborhoods carry greater weight. They can lead from within, in a way outsiders can’t. Support for Market Makeovers: NextGen Leaders is a long-term investment in the future health of East L.A. and Boyle Heights, a model of home-grown leadership development that could be applied all over Los Angeles. Market Makeovers increase access to healthy foods and broaden awareness and education about healthy eating and behaviors; its engaged community participation results in greater buy-in and a better chance at sustainability. Extending these efforts through the NextGen Leaders will result in a cadre of trained, engaged and experienced young leaders who are deeply rooted in community change and who have worked extensively on projects prior to their 24th birthday. NextGen Leaders have skills in: media production; public speaking and presentations; visual communication; teaching and peer leadership; healthy eating and nutrition; media literacy; and social marketing that are invaluable in many fields. And they are placed in an infrastructure that nurtures their development and allows them to directly effect change, whether in their immediate community or throughout L.A. The NextGen Leaders’ age group falls in-between many philanthropic efforts and services, whether or not they are enrolled in higher education. Their needs are acute. Having worked with teens for over twenty years, we often see youth hit an economic and opportunity ceiling once they graduate high school or reach age 18. Even in college, they are isolated from their communities rather than placed into learning and service opportunities in their neighborhoods, where they can deepen their roots and connections. Scholarship programs often don’t come close to covering the true cost of higher education. Vocational programs tend to train professions, not creative leaders. Through Market Makeovers, we can change this and the food landscape together.

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Arts on the Grounds: L.A. Escena Performance Series
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Arts on the Grounds unique programming will actively engage the diverse community in the West Adams district, UCLA students, scholars, and K-12 school groups with intersections between literature and the performing arts. The program aims to increase the opportunities for engagements with art for local residents in low-income neighborhoods, address a growing demand for performing arts in the West Adams district, and foster partnerships between humanities scholars and performing arts practitioners. The partners and productions in the series that we will pilot in Summer 2013 have been selected based on their appeal to Spanish-speaking audiences in local communities and are designed to engage youth from low-income families in cultural enrichment. We expect to reach a total audience of 800-1000 during the Summer 2013 Arts on the Grounds series. Each theater event will be promoted by both our theatrical partners and the Clark Library, and we will work with the West Adams Heritage Association to advertise the events in their newsletter and other appropriate neighborhood outlets.

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$1,000,000 in total grants
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Submission Began
Tuesday, February 26

Submission Ended
Thursday, March 28
at 12:00 PM PDT

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Voting Began
Tuesday, April 02

Voting Ended
Wednesday, April 17
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-3 Step3-title
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address

Winner Announced
Wednesday, May 08

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