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Fandango Obon Project / Proyecto Fandango Obon
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While our neighborhoods in many ways provide comfortable, safe havens, and especially for immigrant populations, there should exist friendly avenues to enter and exit, and meaningful opportunities to engage across them. Great Leap continues its commitment to use the arts to bridge cultural boundaries. Over our 35 years we have developed methodologies to provide people of diverse ethnicities, religions and other self-identifications with opportunities for deep and meaningful encounters. Important elements of Fandango-Obon are providing a compelling purpose for people to come together, and the creation of an affirming space for exploration and expression without judgment. It is an entrance to a place in time where music, dance, and connection with one’s ancestral traditions can be lived with pride. Our theater techniques, games and other facilitation frameworks help participants bond with people of other backgrounds, often for the first time. Once such a “barrier” is unlocked, it can be more easily be opened in future encounters across the city. We practice assertive outreach to ensure that our gatherings are not only cross-cultural, but also intergenerational, so that young people can learn from elders who may have deeper understanding from direct experience with their cultural heritage. Geographical dimensions of L. A. will be utilized in unique ways. The L.A. River separates Boyle Heights and Little Tokyo. Though only a short walk across a bridge, residents of the respective neighborhoods generally do not interact, other than in passing. Fandango-Obon will give impetus to cross the “bridge” – on foot, bicycle or via the metro. A workshop at the Nishi Hongwanji Temple just west of the 1st St. Bridge, will welcome a mainly Latino community into a Japanese American setting. Conversely, residents of Little Tokyo will travel the short distance to Boyle Heights to be welcomed by our workshop partner Building Healthy Communities. Additional cross-cultural engagements include a workshop at A Place Called Home (APCH) in South Los Angeles, bringing Japanese Americans to a center with mainly African American and Latino youth. APCH is located only 3 miles south of Little Tokyo down Central Avenue, an historic cultural Mecca of its own. Fandango-Obon will elevate awareness of Angelenos’ common histories within geographic proximity. For example, how many of us knew that Boyle Heights has had established Japanese and Jewish communities in the recent past? Mutual understanding can lower cultural barriers and help us “create a circle dance” that respects our uniqueness while building trust and stronger community relations. We see the potential for this project to change stereotypical perceptions that separate us. As our city and nation continues moving toward people of color being the majority, we want L.A. to stand out as a place where arts and culture are robust and accessible to all and are used in innovative ways to meet our challenges.

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Youth Outreach Unit "Together We Create a Better Y.O.U."
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Demographic experts tell us that if juvenile crime rates for persons 10 to 17 continue to increase with expected youth population increases, the year 2010 will see the number of juvenile-committed violent crimes increase by nearly 15 percent. However, these projections do not have to be America's destiny. Over the past two years, there has been a decline in the rates of both murders committed by youth and youth violence in general. While the juvenile violent crime arrest rate increased 62% between 1987 and 1993, it decreased 2.9% in 1995, the first decline in seven years. As the problem of juvenile violence has grown, so has our understanding of the problem and some possible solutions. A small percentage of youth are responsible for the bulk of violent juvenile crime; most violent crimes committed by youth are committed against other juveniles; and many involve handguns and/or drug use. Violence is a learned behavior and children neglected, left alone, or uncared for, without appropriate role models, often do not learn right from wrong. Children who suffer abuse at the hands of family violence often learn that violence is natural, even expected. The success of our V2K Community Development Program has been positively correlated with a multitude of public service assistance. Experts agree that the best predictors of successful transition are: an intensively supportive environment, counseling, mentoring, education, drug treatment, and opportunities for employment. A highly structure multidisciplinary case plan and customized youth services are unavoidably intertwined as a means to successfully engage youth and propel them towards a productive future. The unique program design and topic courses that we have created with the target population in mind (i.e. safety, date rape, gang abatement, self-esteem, childcare, health care, rape crisis counseling, youth support, anger management, violence awareness, mentoring, academic assistance, communication, etc.) will especially benefit minors who have a propensity to engage in criminal and delinquent behavior. Many experts agree that the way one thinks, leads to the way an individual behaves. Delinquency and youth crime affect not only the victims, but has a “domino effect” on the entire community regardless of the severity of the crime. As youth crime prevails, community fear increases, public safety costs rise, and insecurities abound. It costs more than $40,000 annually to maintain a juvenile in a correctional facility. It costs about $4,000 a year to keep a young person in school. As a result of the erosion of the value of the “family”, the rising costs for education, an increase in prison construction, dilapidated school systems, and cutbacks in state and federal funding, agencies have to rethink their approach to program service delivery. Our ultimate challenge is to debunk various published statistics and promote awareness for what goes on in our community.

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Casa Amador
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The mission of Reach for the Top, Inc., is to address the plight of homeless and provide the support necessary for them to attain the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency to become to become permanently housed. Reach for the Top, Inc., provides transitional housing where clients can stabilize in a safe, nurturing, environment while receiving the assistance necessary to access the services that lead to permanent housing. Our goal is to send healthy, self-confident, competent persons back into society. This program will help reduce the tax money used to care for the chronically homeless. Our residents will no loner be in jails, Emergency Rooms, or shelter. They will be in their new home, stable, safe and supported. We will assist them in finding permanent housing. The proposed location of Casa Amador, 4801 West Adams was involved in the civil unrest of 1992. Almost 84% of commercial structures and 83% of residential structures were in need of repair, according to a California Redevelopment Association survey done in 1995. By developing this lot, it will aesthetically change the characteristics of this blighted area, encourage outside investment and provide much needed services to a neglected community. Providing stable transitional housing for the chronically homeless population that will also offer resources so residents can learn new skills, find employment, and finally find permanent housing will benefit the area greatly. These individuals will be supported so that they can succeed. Their success will bring hope to the neighborhood and elevate the entire area. This project specifically deals with women and children. For the children living at our facility they will have a better start to their day; providing them with the foundation to succeed in school and life. this will set them on the track to grow into conscientious citizens. Lastly our community center will be open to all individuals looking to participate or learn something new. This center will provide a place for people who might be on the edge of poverty. We would provide help to those who need it, keeping the potential homeless in their homes.

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KIPP Through College
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The neighborhoods of South and East Los Angeles, where KIPP LA students and alumni live, face astonishingly high levels of illiteracy, drug abuse, gang violence, and juvenile crime. Schools are overcrowded and underperforming; virtually all traditional public middle and high schools are failing according to No Child Left Behind. Overall, fewer than 10 percent of students in these neighborhoods attend a four-year college or university after graduating high school and only 4 percent go on to obtain a degree.</br></br>Today more than ever, students in underserved communities need an outstanding education to prepare them for success in life and to overcome the cycle of poverty. Research suggests that by 2018, 63 percent of jobs will require some higher education. By comparison, only 36 percent of jobs will be available to those with a high school degree or lower, leaving those without higher degrees access to even fewer jobs than they have today. Over the course of a lifetime, college graduates will earn on average $1.6 million more than those without a degree.</br></br>Unfortunately, the youth of South and East Los Angeles are highly unlikely to graduate high school college-ready or go on to graduate college. According to The Education Trust West, only 22 percent of LAUSD students graduate with the requirements necessary to enroll in a University of California institution. This is the case for only 16 percent of Latino students. Research suggests that just over half of these students will matriculate to college and only 41 percent of them will graduate. Based on these figures, we estimate that only 4 percent of students in South and East Los Angeles actually obtain a college degree within six years.</br></br>KIPP LA, on the other hand, is succeeding at helping students from underserved communities “climb the mountain” to and through college. With the unwavering support of KIPP LA’s KTC team, 96 percent of our alumni are attending 140 high-performing, college-prep high schools, and nearly 85 percent are currently attending over 80 colleges and universities across the country. We foresee that our alumni – as self-directed, purposeful college graduates – will also work to improve educational and economic opportunities across Los Angeles. This will mean stronger economic outcomes, such as lifetime earnings and employment rates, in the city’s currently most underserved areas. Thus, supporting KIPP LA is not only an investment in underserved students’ education and preparation for college; it is an investment in the future of our city and country.

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The Big Draw LA
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By using both traditional and non-traditional venues such as parks, public libraries, community centers, city streets, parking lots, theaters and train stations, we are able to reach underserved Los Angeles populations that may not seek or view art in their day-to-day activities, and engage them in the act of creation. Participating in art making and cultural activities leads to a stronger community and enhances human development at the individual level. As before, we expect that numerous museums, schools, cultural organizations, galleries, and even retail outlets will participate this October in The Big Draw LA. By having all the events marketed jointly, participants who participate in an event in their own neighborhoods first may be enticed to visit an unfamiliar venue for another event later in the month. By further diversifying the array of presenting venues, we want to be sure there are drawing events close to residents from across the Los Angeles region. While one may not expect to see a drawing activity at a park or on a local street during daily activities (commuting through a transit station, a weekend shopping day, a race or other sports activity, a farmers market), its ease of access may encourage people to stop and participate. The benefits of unique sites can work both ways. Our organization would like the extra resources to provide all art materials, resource guides, and other public awareness materials to our Los Angeles partners—making it as easy and accessible as possible for a traditional or non-traditional venue to host a Big Draw LA event for their surrounding communities. For many people, the notion of drawing can be intimidating. Most do not consider themselves to be artists; yet we know that drawing is something rewarding everyone can do. The informality of the highly participatory experiences, the familiarity of the venues, and the thoughtful planning of the presenters fosters a positive experience. In our previous three years of BDLA, we found that many participants simply discovered our flagship “Make Your Mark in the Park” event while walking through Exposition Park or Grand Park to get somewhere else. These people stayed and seemed delighted to have discovered the opportunity to “get back to drawing,” and were willing to not just watch their children draw, but to draw with them, and happily took a sketchbook to “do more” as they left. By bringing activities close to home, and in many cases, integrated as an extension of other activities the family is already engaged with, it is more likely that they will choose to participate, and feel it was a fulfilling experience worth repeating. We hope that this will bring active participation in cultural and artistic activities to the many pockets of the Los Angeles area.

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Destination College
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A good education is key to helping elevate individuals from the cycle of poverty. A 2009 U.S. Department of Education study showed that the average income by a high school dropout was $19,540, those with a high school diploma increased to $27,380, an associate’s degree earned an average of $36,190, and a Bachelor’s degree earned more than double a dropout salary at $46,930. These statistics clearly indicate that the average high school dropout is likely to earn wages that are below the federal poverty level and that the higher the education level, the greater chance for economic self-sufficiency. Study after study has also shown that a higher education will deter one from crime, lowering incarceration rates and also promotes a higher degree of engagement in community and civic activities. This project will lead to a better educated workforce and create a ripple effect that impacts students, parents and families, and Los Angeles businesses by 2050. The Fulfillment Fund will continue to support college access in Los Angeles while broadening our reach in partner high schools, serving more students and creating school-wide impact. There is currently a lack of opportunities for students growing up in economically and educationally under-resourced communities to get the help they need to successfully navigate the college going process. Among our students, the majority - 69% are Latino and 19% are African-American. A combined 80% of the population we serve receive free or reduced lunch. Nationally, for students from low-income families, only 54% go on to college as compared to 84% of their more affluent counterparts. By increasing student and parent participation, we can have a positive impact on these statistics and increase of number of low-income students, in particular the number of Latino and African-American students graduating high school and attending college. Our college matriculation rates over the past two years show that, as a result of our services, Fulfillment Fund students are matriculating to University of California colleges at a higher rate than Los Angeles County as a whole by a margin of 3%. They are also matriculating to California state schools at nearly double the rate of LA County overall (43% vs. 23%). Expansion of Destination College outside of current Fulfillment Fund students will allow us to serve Los Angeles students and families that are most in need by motivating students and demonstrating that college is an viable opportunity no matter what the obstacles or financial concerns.

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Change-Making Gardens
Change-Making Gardens
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Right now to get a plot at a community garden, in most places in LA County you have to wait 3 to 6 YEARS. Meanwhile, there are many groups that are “thinking about” creating a community garden. ECM’s networking partners know specific landholders who are “thinking about” opening their land to growing food. Yet all these groups are scared of the unknown because they have never done it before. We have. We’ve created gardens in several vastly different models of what “community gardening” can mean (traditional plot style, school garden, and charity style). We can share what works and what doesn’t work, and help groups who are “thinking about it” get past the mulling-it-over stage into meaningful action – into creating real, physical, much-needed garden spaces. Ultimately, our project will facilitate much more land being available for community gardens in Los Angeles. Additionally, ECM has the connections – locally, nationally and internationally – with people who are taking a proactive stance to the threats posed by climate change, peak oil, resource limitations, and economic contraction. These are big scary problems, but there is plenty that we can do as grassroots citizens. Our project will lead to greater awareness of the issues, with more people striving to prepare our city and its citizens for the realities of the future.

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Sustainable Works Presents Dr. Keeling’s Curve
Sustainable Works Presents Dr. Keeling’s Curve
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By telling the story of climate change in the form of a provocative play, starring a well known and respected actor, we will reach thousands of people who might otherwise not have been exposed to this crucial information.

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This past year, LAUSD shortened the academic school year, laid off hundreds of qualified teachers, cut almost all after-school, art and music programs, and reduced funding dramatically. Ironically, students have then been asked to perform higher on California Standardized Tests. Our Dreamers already contend with substandard living, nutrition, and educational facilities. IHADLA aims to fill these gaps and beyond with the understanding that a better life for these children means a better life for all of us. IHADLA specifically chooses different program sites throughout Los Angeles so that we make the most impact possible across the county. By providing the children with the greatest needs with IHADLA’s “whole-life” programming, we are dramatically increasing their opportunity to succeed. Higher graduation rates, and healthier lifestyles, mean that they are less likely to rely upon the public welfare system and also less likely to cause crime, which leads to a decreased burden on the prison system in California. High school dropouts are four times more likely to be unemployed as those who have a college degree, and are more likely to require federal assistance. They are also more likely to be delinquents, as eighty-two percent of prisoners in America are dropouts. Most of all, by supporting IHADLA, Angelenos are making an investment in the future of our city. The future innovators of science, technology, social science, etc. are standing before us at 99th Street Elementary School in Watts. They have extraordinary potential. However, most of their parents never finished high school, and even fewer still know what it’s like to earn above the poverty line. Who, if not IHADLA, will lead these children towards towards their dreams? To turn our backs on them would be to turn our backs on our own community, and our economy, and all of our futures.

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Creative Capital: A campaign for a healthy & prosperous Los Angeles
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A broad, robust, and diverse investment in arts and culture will ensure a healthy and prosperous Los Angeles. Great cities invest in arts and culture to the level they invest in infrastructure, education, business, and health. Creative Capital LA will generate the public support that LA2050 cites as critical to ensuring the vitality not only of arts and culture, but of the city itself. Creative Capital LA will lead to “coherent arts-nurturing” policies that strengthen not only the arts & culture indicator, but also several other indicators, such as Income & Employment, which will benefit from job growth in the creative economy. Creative Capital LA will expand every resident’s ability to participate in arts advocacy by democratizing the tools and expanding our Social Connectedness when we recognize ourselves and our communities as “Creative Capitals.” After Arts & Culture Vitality, Education is the indicator that would be most affected by the public engagement made possible by Creative Capital LA. The majority of low-income students have little to no access to arts education. One of the reasons arts education is so important for low-income students is that it directly addresses the student achievement gap. Studies have shown that arts education improves literacy, numeracy, school attendance (and as a result, lowers the dropout rate), and parental engagement (Youth ARTS Development Project, 1996, U.S. Department of Justice; Arts Education Partnership, CAAE.) At-risk students who have access to the arts in or out of school also tend to have better academic results, better workforce opportunities, and more civic engagement, according to a new NEA report, The Arts and Achievement in At-Risk Youth (2012). By promoting arts education and its connection to 21st century skills. Creative Capital LA will increase public support for education reform and make a complete education possible for LA County’s 1.6 million public school students. We imagine a Los Angeles County in which every young person develops the skills to succeed in our creative industries, from fashion to film, visual art to visual effects, design to drama. And when artists, creative entrepreneurs, and forward thinkers engage with our elected officials, our collaborative thinking will push Los Angeles to the forefront of American creativity and innovation.

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Creative Placemaking in Downtown L.A.
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This project serves to enhance the lives of hundreds each year by creating jobs, access to affordable housing, and providing spatial resources specifically for the support of artists and their creative processes. It will keep balance between residents, artists, officials, developers and business owners by giving a common ground for discussion, education, community gatherings, social and commercial connectivity. The creation of similar centers throughout Los Angeles will disseminate like values and opportunities for other communities, based on their specific needs. This will have a direct impact on each key indicator mentioned in the LA2050 Report. • Education – Studies conducted by the California Alliance for Arts Education show that arts education engages students in learning and helps prepare our youth to meet expectation of the 21st century workforce. By offering arts education outside the K-12 system, we encourages life-long learning. • Income and Employment – Art Share’s proposed model creates on-going, entry-level jobs and entrepreneurial opportunities. Proven to revitalize local economies, Art Share L.A. will attract new businesses, new tourists and new commerce—creating jobs across multiple sectors. • Housing – Development of centers like Art Share L.A. increases access to creative and affordable live/work/rehearsal space. Art Share L.A. contributes 30-live/work lofts to the market. • Environmental Quality – If we can lessen the need for day-to-day travel while increasing public transportation, we will see a significantly stronger impact in our environmental quality. As neighborhoods develop around their respective creative centers, the need to travel for basic amenities and entertainment will decrease. • Public Safety – As people take ownership over their communities and begin connecting with one another through participation in artistic and cultural activities, official or unofficial ‘neighborhood watch’ goes into effect. Studies show that participants in cultural events and activities are more likely to be civically engaged—enabling them to organize and function stronger as communities. • Social Connectedness – Through the Work Exchange program, we encourage volunteerism in the community and give opportunity for everyone to feel valued and involved in the arts. Art is often intertwined with political, environmental and larger societal issues. By nature of association, residents participating in cultural activities will be more aware and more socially connected. • Arts and Cultural Vitality – Creation of such art centers throughout Los Angeles will provide access to physical space for creation and an intangible system of support that nurtures artistic endeavors by providing local touring networks and monetizable opportunities.

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The Los Angeles Giant Harp Project
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The Giant Harp Project is extremely unique. It celebrates the temporal transformation of Los Angeles architecture, along with providing world class entertainment for free. This project makes arts education accessible to all through workshops designed to engage multiple communities regardless of their age and physical or mental abilities. Because String Theory has been celebrated by the finest venues of LA, the city has already embraced the phenomena of the Giant Harp. However, it has not been accessible to people without the means to buy tickets to the shows. Artists for Literacy and String Theory are excited to partner with Los Angeles in pioneering the effort to bridge the gap between artists and audience. Without compromising artistic integrity, The Giant Harp Project, believes that the integration of work created by the public (via our workshops) can fortify the actual performance of String Theory and honor the collaborative potential between artist and audience. At its core, this process is about engagement and discovery by both the artists and audiences at a profound level. We also believe that the Giant Harp Project is coming at a time when LA is going through tremendous transformations at the community level. When choosing the 3 neighborhoods for our residencies in 2013, we have the opportunity to lend a hand to community stakeholders who are ushering in these changes. For example, the 6th Street Viaduct / Bridge project won’t begin until 2015. The Boyle heights communities impacted by the project have a 100 year history of the bridge to celebrate before it’s torn down. Our Giant Harp Project can speak to that legacy on several levels and also serve a community that is in dire need of an arts infusion. Another location that is compelling to us is the 5 mile radius of the Magnolia Place Community Initiative. They are engaging more than 70 county, city and community organization to bring over 5000 families a comprehensive health and education overhaul. Their innovative coalition has room for a residency like ours to invigoration the public’s excitement and participation around this initiative. Our residency will include grassroots outreach into the communities before hand so that we don’t just come and go without making a true and lasting impact. As proof of concept, Artists for Literacy was funded by the California State Library in 2005 to do a similar project, not with art, but with the celebration of free literacy projects. The advocacy campaign was very successful and those best practices will be used for this project. We also believe in the serendipity of being exposed to the arts and what transforms in people. The Giant Harp Project is designed to inspire the inner artist in everybody. Over the past 10 years, String Theory has proven this theory to be true. Countless people who have participated in our workshops have embraced and accessed an artistic part of themselves.

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Why is the grass always greener over the leach fields?
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Wildwood Mobile Home Country Club Park is at the end of two natural corridors and is also at the end of an industrial corridor, and a direct intervention at Wildwood would quickly impact this depraved community and improve the environmental quality for hundreds: The San Jose Creek is straddled by the City of Industry. As is often the case around rivers in Los Angeles, where the soil is unstable and sometimes contaminated, they build mobile homes, golf courses and schools, and it’s where the industrial and rail corridors are. The industrial corridor in of its business is revealed to be dangerous sometimes. While many visible occupants in the City of Industry are large chain distribution factories and commercial warehouses, there are some Industrial manufacturing complexes. One notorious neighbor, Quemetco, is a lead recycling plant and within a mile of the Wildwood entrance. Ranked #6 of top polluters in California on an EPA ‘Toxic Release Inventory,’ 1,756,634 pounds of total release (of chemical toxins) in a year, includes lead and nitrate compounds (EPA TRI 2011). Residents have been warned of lead pollution by the company’s required mailed-out literature, of possible arsenic and lead compounds and acid vapors in the air. But some of us cannot move away so easily, as the expression goes, ‘we have lead shoes.’ The Puente-Chino Hills Animal Corridor runs parallel to the elongated City of Industry but to the south and is “an unbroken zone of habitat extending nearly 31 miles from the Cleveland National Forest in Orange County to the west end of the Puente Hills…30,000 acres of land” (Habitat Authority). La Puente Landfill funded the preservation authority (tipping fee) to purchase the nearby Puente Hills (Habitat Authority). A 2005 City of Industry planned development, which cuts off this animal corridor in the middle, reflects a pattern of hostility towards ecological considerations by the City of Industry (Spencer, Puente-Chino “Missing Middle” Analysis). Auspiciously, this animal corridor ends at La Puente Landfill, as the only way to connect across the 605 freeway to Whittier Narrows is to fly over or dig under the freeway and through the river (or go through one child-sized underground tunnel?). This also poses an opportunity to provide habitat for wildlife we’d like to attract, like birds. A solution needs to address both of these issues. As a rail passes within 300 feet of these mobile homes right passed the fairway, a more substantial barrier could be established. The industrial corridor pollutes enough into the river system; more properties need to treat their toxic runoff on site. There has to be more creative solutions than golf courses, especially when they are not in use. A second solution should address the animal corridor and alternative ground paths to Whittier Narrows. Some wildlife will be encouraged to visit Wildwood, especially the healthy bird wildlife found in Los Angeles through habitat planning and planting

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Camp Educates Kids Forever
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This scholarship program will allow more than 1,000 youth to attend summer camp in 2013, who otherwise would not have this opportunity. The impact will be realized throughout the City of Los Angeles, with the majority of scholarships being allocated among summer camps located at RAP recreation centers located within economically disadvantaged communities, and for youth to experience a week long overnight camp at one of our two residential camps. The 2005 and 2006 the American Community Survey revealed that 20% of the City met the Federal guidelines for poverty, with a 29% child poverty rate. Approximately 80% of Los Angeles Unified School District students qualify for free or reduced price meals. With over one third of the population of the City under the age of 18 (Census 2010), affordable out of school time programs that offer informal learning opportunities to keep youth engaged in summer vacation months with the goal of minimizing the summer learning gap. The RAP summer day camp and residential camp programs provide a multitude of benefits by bridging social diversity within communities, providing an alternative to anti-social behavior, teaching community values and life skills, facilitating computer literacy, promoting environmental stewardship, advancing socialization skills and team building to teach conflict resolution and problem solving skills, while improving the health of youth by providing alternative physical activities and nutrition.

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Professional women Step Up to help underserved teen girls graduate
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By year-end 2013 Step Up will serve at least 230 female students in grades nine through 12 in low-income and underserved neighborhoods in the city of Los Angeles who attend four of our partner Title 1 schools. Ninety percent of these students are eligible for the federal lunch program, meaning that the students and their families live at or below the federal poverty level, which is how Step Up defines low-income. The ethnic makeup of our students is 2% African-American, 7% Asian, 84% Latina, 4% multi-racial and 2% Did Not Report. In addition: • Over 85% of their primary home languages are not English. • Less than 50% of Step Up girls' parents or guardians have a high school diploma. • 98% of Step Up teens do not have a parent who attended college. We are open to all girls at our partner schools. There is no GPA requirement. Often our girls are those at the middle to bottom of the pack who lack a cohesive social group. But they have an inner drive that gets them in the door. Once in Step Up we’re able to ignite their potential. The impact of low-income, minority youth graduating high school and attending college is documented well by statistics. But what is not always captured is the ripple effect on the community. Many of our girls have younger siblings. They are acutely aware that their success models a new way of life for their family. They know that they are trailblazing in their communities and that other kids are watching. You can’t be what you can’t see. Our professional women serve as role models for our girls. The girls then serve as role models for their peer group and help set higher expectations for the next generation.

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Never Built: Los Angeles
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<p> The stories surrounding these projects reveal a reluctant city whose institutions and infrastructure—from a fractured power base to risk-averse developers to reluctant neighbors —have often undermined visionary work. Our goal is to change this culture, shedding light on the city's many missed opportunities so that visionary, creative, innovative ideas in the large-scale pubic realm will once again be embraced here. Furthermore, much of Los Angeles is ugly and poorly planned. Another aim is to end the complacency about this fact. We want to connect the inherent appeal of unrealized designs to the daily experience of the built world. We want people in Los Angeles and elsewhere to regard beauty and livability as essential rights in their lives. <p/>

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Greening 7th St. in Skid Row/DTLA
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As the re-purposing of downtown Los Angeles continues apace, an eclectic mix of urban functions is taking root including commercial, residential, recreational, and social. The industrial district or Skid Row section of downtown currently hosts functions as diverse as wholesaling, retailing, warehousing, nightlife, housing as well as an array of social services. But in many of these areas there has been a lag in commensurate infrastructure development (which stands in stark contrast to other downtown districts which have experienced significant attention and investment in recent years). While this lag is evident on many levels, one in particular stands out: greening. As the industrial district/Skid Row area increasingly accommodates a diverse set of activities, in many cases it continues to exude a grim sun-bleached austerity more in keeping with it's original single purpose function. Our project of greening 7th St. in downtown's under-served industrial area will not only improve community aesthetics but contribute to sustainability by addressing the urban heat island dynamic as well as improving the health and well being of it's growing population of residents and employees.

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Establishing a Hub for Cleantech Innovation and Job Creation
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We will build new companies, that create new jobs, thereby revitalizing downtown Los Angeles’ industrial core. Broadly, we will bring back the industrial core of downtown Los Angeles by rebuilding it into the cleantech innovation and commercialization center of the region. As a result, this area will once again provide family-supporting jobs for Boyle Heights, Lincoln Heights, East Los Angeles, Central and South Los Angeles, and beyond. In the next 4 years alone just one of the envisioned projects of the Roadmap – the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator’s La Kretz Innovation Campus—will generate over 1700 jobs from companies who pay $45M per year in salaries and wages and generate more than $85M per year in sales. We will create a new industrial powerhouse dedicated to clean technologies and sustainable jobs. We fully expect that by 2050, the LA Arts and Innovation District on the banks of the Los Angeles River will be the leading cleantech innovation and commercialization hub in the world.

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Enhanced Permanent Supportive Housing for Victims of Domestic Violence
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Jenesse's own data and experience in this issue also found that affordable housing and insufficient resurces contributes to the chronic homeless problems of our clients. After completing our program, our clients are ready to live on their own providing a safe, nuturing home for themselves and their children. Nonetheless, being able to do so is not an easy task. Thie high cost of rent and poor credit scores often make it nearly impossible for them to attain adequate housing. Our data reports that , of clients who graduated from our transitional program, 30% had to move in with family, 37% moved to rental housing, 7% leave Jenesse and go to another transtional or homeless shelter, 6% move into Section 8 or other subsidized housing, 3% move to a psychiatric hospital, and 17% are unknown. According to the United Way, 70% of Angelenos cannot afford to purchase a home and renters spend disproportionately more for housing than homeowners. With a rapid increase in demand and a slow increase in supply, the United Way reports that both rental and home prices have skyrocketed over the past few years, with the majority of renters in SPA 6 having to use 50% or more of their income just to pay rent. Jenesse has been studying this problem for years and knows that women who exit our program need affordable, permanent housing. This is why Jenesse Center, Inc. plans to transform some of its transitional housing into affordable, low-income housing. The facilities will accommodate unserved and underserved members of SPA 6 including those who have not previously resided in a Jenesse facility, including emancipated youth. Jenesse will offer tenants self-contained an interactive facility that contains a classroom/computer lab, recreation room, and in-house store. All tenants will be mandated to follow a client responsibility standard that will be explained to them before they move in. Jenesse Center, Inc. intends to assist with meeting the housing needs of the 21st Century and to make sure that residents have the opportunity for safe, affordable housing that meets their ever-changing and ever-growing needs.

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Young Warriors
Young Warriors
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Based on statistics from the California Family Council, children from fatherless homes are more likely to: commit suicide, be poor, drop out of school, have maladaptive behavior, be abused, abuse drugs and alcohol, run away, join gangs, wind up in state institutions or on state welfare, or be killed. Young Warrior changes these boys future for the betterment of themselves and society. 1. The first objective of YW is to increase self-esteem and self-efficacy in boys whose identity is lost and who are at risk of becoming another troubling statistic. YW mentors inspire boys discover their own strengths, take on new challenges, and face their failures as well as their victories. In these critical life lessons, YW mentors develop trust with participants so that the participants are able to hear good advice, and therefore, become good decision makers. 2. The second objective of YW is to encourage and develop positive interpersonal communication amongst participants, mentors, peers, parents, guardians, teachers, and authorities. YW mentors promote diversity and respect for others by modeling self-discipline, integrity, honesty, compassion, forgiveness, ethical and moral behavior. YW starts cultivating these skills in the home by collaborating with a local Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT) in creating a parent education program. This curriculum assists parents become more effective in the lives of their boys. 3. Finally, YW third objective is to prevent negative, risk-taking behavior, including gang prevention. YW reduces the need to find security in gangs, substance abuse, or the like by instilling worth and confidence in participant's abilities. YW participants learn anger management, conflict resolution, and how to engage themselves in healthy, positive affiliations with others.

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$1,000,000 in total grants
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Submission Began
Tuesday, February 26

Submission Ended
Thursday, March 28
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-2-inactive Step2-title-voting-inactive

Voting Began
Tuesday, April 02

Voting Ended
Wednesday, April 17
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-3 Step3-title
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address

Winner Announced
Wednesday, May 08

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