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The power in an hour: Putting time for teachers back in a principal's day
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Across Los Angeles every morning, 750,000 students enter their classrooms. Each of these classrooms is led by a teacher. And each teacher should have a leader who can come into their classroom, observe their instruction and help them to grow so that those 750,000 students get the education that they need to be successful. Our LA2050 proposal will enable this to happen at a dramatically greater scale. This project will identify great ideas, develop them into tools that can be replicated, and test them for efficacy. Once they have been demonstrated to be effective they will be ready to be shared across the hundreds of schools that exist in LA. For example, a tool that saves a principal <b>an hour a day</b>, spread to schools across Los Angeles would translate to nearly a <b>225,000 hours of coaching and support</b> for teachers in their classrooms during each school year. By 2050 this would lead to over <b>8 million</b> additional hours spent developing effective educators in LA.

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The HeArt Project: Arts Education ends the Dropout Crisis in LA
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HP is one of the only arts organizations in L.A. that works exclusively with alternative high school students. Students attend alternative high schools (continuation and community day schools) for reasons including failing grades and behavioral problems, teen pregnancy/parenting, gang involvement, expulsion from their home school districts, or prior incarceration. Most are low-income minorities, and all are at high risk of dropping out for good. Our students have experienced high levels of transience and failure, perceive a lack of future possibilities, and have difficulty recognizing the value of their contributions and connection to others. As a result they are often unable to envision a future where they embark on fulfilling careers, feel a meaningful connection to their community, or identify and pursue substantive goals. We have witnessed through the years -- and research in the field supports our experience -- that the arts are a particularly effective mechanism to inspire hard-to-reach youth. Many HP students are part of rampant cycles of poverty, gang involvement and violence that perpetuate themselves within their families and communities. HP helps students help themselves and chart a new course in life. HP students connect with professional mentors, contribute to a positive peer network, graduate high school, and pursue substantive goals. By investing in their own potential, these teenagers transform into fulfilled and responsible adults with a stake in their communities. HP’s work is significantly underscored by a major report just recently released from the National Endowment for the Arts, “Arts and Achievement in At-Risk Youth” (2012), which compiles findings from four longitudinal studies. One example from the study is that in two separate databases, students who had arts-rich experiences in high school showed higher overall GPAs than did students who lacked those experiences. And further, high school students who earned few or no arts credits were five times more likely not to have graduated than students who earned many arts credits. This significant effect of the arts on the graduation rate of at-risk teenagers mirrors what we have witnessed in our 20 years of service.

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Empowering Teens with the Knowledge and Skills to Make Healthy Decisions
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Many LAUSD schools are opting to forego the traditional 9th grade semester-long health class, instead absorbing the minimum mandated CA Education Code HIV/AIDS prevention education into advisory or science classes. Our program is a free service to schools, and includes not only HIV/AIDS prevention and awareness education, but also education on a number of topics that have the potential to impact high school graduation rates, public safety (such as sexual assault and intimate partner violence), and the overall health and wellness of low-income communities in LA. We also increase civic participation and social connectedness in LA County by engaging college students in the communities beyond their campuses.

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A Passion at Risk
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The education community in Los Angeles is outrageously fractured. Despite many attempts to improve education in Los Angeles, we still have persistently failing schools throughout the county. Many times we look for a one size fits all solution and instead of empowering teachers, we are imposing strict rules and regulations that may or may not benefit their work with their students. Currently in LAUSD, we are about to implement a new teacher evaluation system that will likely fail to because of opposition from teachers and a lack of a clear plan from administrators. This film will highlight the need for teachers to have a voice in the changes they will be asked to implement in their classrooms.

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LA American Indian College Education Initiative
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According to the U.S. Census Bureau in 2008, 155,010 American Indians live in Los Angeles. Los Angeles led all of the nation's counties in the number of people of this racial category. The LA American Indian College Education Initiative will help American Indian students achieve academic success middle school through college for the purpose of becoming successful and positive community roles models in Los Angeles.

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LA v2.0: Transforming LA into a World Class Place to Live
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Let's face it. Life right now in the Los Angeles region is a dysfunctional mess. Millions of us suffer every day through the infamous reality of how difficult it is to slog from far-flung housing to jobs, without the adequate commuter options that other cities around the world have, but we have never managed to achieve. With high demand versus available supply, some choose to move to more affordable suburbs and exurbs – but then contribute to the traffic problem (given the lack of adequate transit options), contributing to the gridlock that blocks new housing from being built closer to job centers and bringing down costs in the first place. Revolutionizing access to housing by transforming Angelenos commuting options will transform the daily experience for commuting Angelenos, open up a revolutionary number of new, denser housing options constructed near rail stations and near job centers, and reduce costs for transportation bared by working families, freeing up income to be able to afford housing in the first place. With a functioning transportation system anchored by fast, frequent, subway, light rail, and commuter rail options -- plus bike-friendly and walkable neighborhoods, community fears about developments' traffic impacts won't stop transit-friendly housing from being developed. And LA will be able to build the housing density around job centers needed to meet our housing challenges, making housing more affordable as supply increases to meet demand. Meanwhile, existing areas with more affordable options -- from the San Fernando Valley to traditionally lower-income areas across the region, will gain better access to jobs. And Angelenos with the newfound practical option of ditching their car and commuting by fast, efficient transit options, will see huge savings (estimated at $900/month: http://bit.ly/XFWdVk) that they can use to help them afford their housing costs. OTHER BENEFITS Getting LA a fully-built-out rail system will bring huge gains in quality of life for Angelenos, dramatically changing the game for many, if not all, of the LA2050 indicators, e.g.: * environmental quality: car dependency and sprawl leads to smog and public health problems * income & employment: LAEDC says Measure R’s transportation construction will create 409,080 jobs with labor income of $24.9 billion over a thirty year period (PDF: http://bit.ly/14mznJk); we propose something significantly more ambitious than this, which will create magnitudes more jobs * public safety: improving mobility would improve emergency response and free officers to attend to public safety issues instead of inching along in bumper-to-bumper traffic * social consecutiveness / arts and cultural vitality: Angelenos are less likely to volunteer, participate in nonprofits, or attend arts and cultural events because traffic (and lack of rail alternatives) makes getting there so onerous.

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Grades of Green - Los Angeles Youth Corps
Grades of Green - Los Angeles Youth Corps
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<p>Grades of Green’s LAYC will benefit Los Angeles in several important ways. </p> <p>First and foremost, each participating school and school community will receive direct environmental benefit from that school’s Green Project, be it a Walk to School Wednesday or Trash-Free Tuesday Lunch Campaign, an e-Waste Collection, a Campus-Wide Detox, a Compost System Implementation, a clean up of a local park or beach or whatever Green Project the team chooses to implement. Results of the Green Projects will range from fewer carbon emissions, less trash sent to local landfills, proper disposal of electronic materials, the elimination of toxic chemicals on campus and so on. </p> <p>Additionally, each of the 10 participating schools will become a “Grades of Green School” with access to over 40 free, fun and hands-on environmental education tools and activities they can continue to implement on campus for the years to come. The schools can build on their experience and success and take on additional green activities as they are ready. Statistics indicate, and our experience confirms, that when schools implement programs like the ones we have detailed on our website, the schools typically save money, test scores go up and students learn valuable lessons about the power their individual actions can have in helping to protect the environment. </p> <p>Moreover, we have found that by educating and inspiring our kids to care for and protect the environment, we are raising environmental awareness in our communities through a “trickle up” approach. That is, when students learn, for example, about the “4Rs” – reduce, reuse, recycle and rot (composting) – they often go home and ask their parents to help them pack trash free lunches or set up recycle and/or composting systems at home. Students also take these ideas to their teachers and administrators and ask for their help making their schools cleaner and greener. We have even seen students empowered by our education programs petition their local governments for environmental measures. In Manhattan Beach, for example, Grades of Green kids were the impetus behind the City banning the use of plastic bags. Hermosa Beach students were credited with convincing their City Council to ban the use of Styrofoam containers in local restaurants. The LAYC will inspire and empower students to care for and protect the environment; those students, in turn, will inspire and empower their broader school community, including their parents, educators, community leaders and businesspeople to care for and protect the environment. This ripple effect will benefit the entire city of Los Angeles. </p> <p>Finally, and most importantly, we are shaping the minds and habits of Los Angeles’ next generation of leaders, teachers, voters, executives and parents – the people who can make a difference in what Los Angeles looks like in 2050. </p>

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Central Educational Network Based On The Apprenticeship Model
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The LA Makerspace is committed to fostering innovation and embracing community. We chose Downtown LA / South LA as our neighborhood as it is conveniently within reach of public transportation, providing ready access to a variety of neighborhoods independent of their socioeconomic status. LA Makerspace provides shared physical resources otherwise unaffordable or attainable by an individual or family. It provides a fluid workspace in order to facilitate the collaboration, inspiration and encouragement of others. The maker movement, as it pertains to education, seeks to build the confidence, analytic skills, and creativity of those involved by establishing an environment centered on the creative act. This collaborative and project-based approach to learning runs counter to the current trend in education of defining academic success in terms of standardized tests, especially at the cost of hands-on programs such as shop, art, and laboratory science. It is a place to learn about engineering, design, and research through both organized classes as well as open-ended projects. As an educational endeavor LA Makerspace provides a community meeting point for projects ranging from robotics to filmmaking, as well as a shared lab space for community members to develop their own projects and work with partnered research institutions within our citizen science program. This community of practice also includes the running of teacher workshops whereby current educators meet, with students and professionals, to design and test various projects to run in and outside the traditional classroom. LA Makerspace bridges the gap between academia and the community-at-large by establishing a peer-to-peer mentorship network and giving members the chance to apprentice into a whole variety of fields ranging from industrial design to data analysis. The ultimate goal for LA Makerspace is to foster productive community members.

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Building on LA's Social Capital
Building on LA's Social Capital 10 Pink-talk-bubble-tail
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<p>The driving force for creating the Lending Circles for Citizenship model is to simultaneously provide immigrants with tools for financial integration while enhancing the capacity of immigrant services organizations to support this process. Based on the success of the pilot, MAF is confident that the model has the potential for expansion among additional community-based partners in Los Angeles. Upon the passage of Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR), social lending can serve as a model for helping undocumented immigrants collectively pool their money to pay for any penalty needed to adjust their status.</p> <p>With respect to its impact in Los Angeles, the Lending Circles for Citizenship model will increase civic participation among the region’s legal permanent resident population. Going beyond theoretical classroom knowledge, immigrants will have the opportunity to achieve real-life, tangible, and measurable outcomes, such as opening bank accounts at mainstream financial institutions, saving and applying for citizenship, and increasing credit scores. Moreover, the program will increase the capacity of Los Angeles nonprofit organizations to provide a responsible, trustworthy, and socially conscious financial product that improves financial outcomes for their clients.</p> <p>Similar to Lending Circles for Citizenship, the benefits of the Security Deposit Loan program also have a tremendous impact on the ability of participants to achieve their goals. Through receiving an affordable loan repayable over two years, renting an apartment becomes accessible to participants. In addition to decreasing housing instability and homelessness, the program’s financial and social benefits on the Los Angeles population include:</p> <p>1. Renting a first apartment will become accessible to people who currently lack savings. 2. The loan will be paid back over two years, making monthly payments affordable. 3. The process will provide a safe lending experience that models and encourages responsible financial behavior and success. 4. The loan will improve credit scores and develop a pot of savings for future rent deposits.</p>

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Why is the grass always greener over the leach fields?
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Wildwood Mobile Home Country Club Park is at the end of two natural corridors and is also at the end of an industrial corridor, and a direct intervention at Wildwood would quickly impact this depraved community and improve the environmental quality for hundreds: The San Jose Creek is straddled by the City of Industry. As is often the case around rivers in Los Angeles, where the soil is unstable and sometimes contaminated, they build mobile homes, golf courses and schools, and it’s where the industrial and rail corridors are. The industrial corridor in of its business is revealed to be dangerous sometimes. While many visible occupants in the City of Industry are large chain distribution factories and commercial warehouses, there are some Industrial manufacturing complexes. One notorious neighbor, Quemetco, is a lead recycling plant and within a mile of the Wildwood entrance. Ranked #6 of top polluters in California on an EPA ‘Toxic Release Inventory,’ 1,756,634 pounds of total release (of chemical toxins) in a year, includes lead and nitrate compounds (EPA TRI 2011). Residents have been warned of lead pollution by the company’s required mailed-out literature, of possible arsenic and lead compounds and acid vapors in the air. But some of us cannot move away so easily, as the expression goes, ‘we have lead shoes.’ The Puente-Chino Hills Animal Corridor runs parallel to the elongated City of Industry but to the south and is “an unbroken zone of habitat extending nearly 31 miles from the Cleveland National Forest in Orange County to the west end of the Puente Hills…30,000 acres of land” (Habitat Authority). La Puente Landfill funded the preservation authority (tipping fee) to purchase the nearby Puente Hills (Habitat Authority). A 2005 City of Industry planned development, which cuts off this animal corridor in the middle, reflects a pattern of hostility towards ecological considerations by the City of Industry (Spencer, Puente-Chino “Missing Middle” Analysis). Auspiciously, this animal corridor ends at La Puente Landfill, as the only way to connect across the 605 freeway to Whittier Narrows is to fly over or dig under the freeway and through the river (or go through one child-sized underground tunnel?). This also poses an opportunity to provide habitat for wildlife we’d like to attract, like birds. A solution needs to address both of these issues. As a rail passes within 300 feet of these mobile homes right passed the fairway, a more substantial barrier could be established. The industrial corridor pollutes enough into the river system; more properties need to treat their toxic runoff on site. There has to be more creative solutions than golf courses, especially when they are not in use. A second solution should address the animal corridor and alternative ground paths to Whittier Narrows. Some wildlife will be encouraged to visit Wildwood, especially the healthy bird wildlife found in Los Angeles through habitat planning and planting

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Skid Row 2050
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The goal of the project is to create an inclusive and consensus-based model for healthy community development. We plan to develop policy suggestions and design possibilities of the built environment in Skid Row, transforming the lowest-income area of Los Angeles. Additionally, we want the existing population in Skid Row to have a vested interest in their community and increase a sense of ownership and buy-in for the area. <br/><br/> The ultimate goal of this project is to create a living product that creates an infrastructure for development and inclusion that fosters growth and transformation in the area. This community plan will raise awareness to a part of Los Angeles that has constantly been swept under the rug. This project will bring attention to a problem that is often marginalized and seen as someone else’s problem thus perpetuating the social injustice. By bringing homelessness and the lack of affordable housing to the forefront, we can begin a dialog that puts the most vulnerable at the center of the conversation. The Downtown Renaissance has never included Skid Row; this is an opportunity to make sure it does not continue to be left out of the conversation. <br/><br/> We aim to expand the dialog around the impact and possibilities of housing. Rather than just defined as a roof over one’s head, we hope to activate and push the performative aspects of housing. We want to redefine housing as intentional components of daily life that have been thoughtfully designed, developed, and operated. We strive to serve as an example of how housing and the built environment can transform lives and be an active part of the fabric and identity of Los Angeles.

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The A LOT Initiative: Using Art to Activate Vacant City Lots
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Arts Council for Long Beach and its partners have embarked on a unique, initiative that blends arts participation with community redevelopment. The A LOT Initiative will improve the vitality of traditionally underserved neighborhood and enliven the areas through arts participation. A LOT encourages the presence and participation in cultural opportunities by bringing art into communities. It furthers support of cultural participation by creating art opportunities in areas where previously there was limited to no access to the arts. A LOT allows new audiences to experience art in their neighborhood. While the current structure and focus of the initiative is on underserved neighborhoods and residents in the Long Beach area, the project's concepts can be applied throughout the region.

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OPENHealth Central  Putting the "care" back in healthcare
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The personal, community, and healthcare costs associated with treating chronic illness are crippling Los Angeles; the costs associated with not treating such cases are even greater. The influx of newly insured people in Los Angeles is taxing an already burdened system, because a significant number of these families have serious untreated illnesses and challenging social barriers to negotiate. New strategies must be adopted now if we are to make headway by 2050. OPENHealth Central is designed to help clinics better plan and coordinate the in-home and clinical care of patients with chronic illnesses before their conditions grow serious, complex, and expensive. Baked into the shape and purpose of OPENHealth Central is a data-collection regime that aids clinics in improving quality of care and reducing costs. In addition to directly benefitting the patients and clinics using OPENHealth Central, these data will help identify which 'needles' to move across Los Angeles, helping to determine what is achieving positive results, and sharing those insights broadly. These data, in turn, will provide policymakers and clinical practice leaders the information they need to channel resources where they are most needed. L.A.'s current safety-net approach to healthcare (like the rest of the state's) is limited to face-to-face strategies, emphasizing the volume of medical encounters over the value of medical attention. This must change if we are to improve outcomes while decreasing per-capita healthcare costs. OPENHealth Central is designed to increase the volume and value of care encounters while driving down costs, in part by providing digital tools that make it easier to make care decisions more accurately and swiftly. Community-oriented care organizations (such Lybba's collaborator, Family & Parent Centered Care Partners,) strive to achieve the IHI Triple Aim of improved patient experience and care processes, improved outcomes, and better cost controls. But these organizations lack the computational infrastructure to make methodical and swift progress. Without data and the IT infrastructure to direct care resources optimally, even the most dedicated physicians and their care teams have difficulty discriminating between effective and ineffective care strategies. The business model for OPENHealth Central is centered around providing that infrastructure at low cost to clinical practices that would otherwise be unable to build their own. The good news is that people actually will take better care for themselves and one another, especially when they have continuous, personal relationships with healthcare providers who know their case well and can help them achieve lifestyle and wellness objectives. Primary care practices in under-served communities are best positioned to be partners with these individuals, provided they have the tools they need to manage the care of their population.

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La Loma Center: Green Education, Environmental Resources, and Job Training
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Our project will benefit Los Angeles in numerous ways as was discussed above. Specifically, we will have a major impact on the creation natural parks, beautiful gardens, and public spaces to organize community. LA has a shortage of green spaces, we solve that problem. We will empower the community with information and work, hosting regular classes, community workshops, and job training on a variety of relevant sustainability issues. Specific subjects include Arboriculture, Aquaculture, Beekeeping, Soil, Water, Seeds, School Composting, Compost Tea, Vermiculture, Xeriscape, Drip Irrigation, Dry-Stacked Broken Concrete Terracing, Masonry, Carpentry, Metalwork, Edible Gardening, Food Preservation (solar dehydration, canning), Fruit Tree Pruning, Green Roofs, Greywater, Living Walls, Natural Building (cobb, adobe), Natural Pools, Permaculture, Rainwater Harvesting, Urban Agriculture, Rocket Stoves/Ovens, Solar Power, Conservation Remodeling, and so much more. Our facilities will provide a perfect location for school field trips, afterschool programs, regular farmers’ market, as well as special events. We will become the place to go for cutting edge information and resources to improve our environmental health and urban sustainability. Designers and contractors will depend on us for the dissemination of ideas and supplies, hopefully inspiring the replication of the model. DIY people will be empowered by our offerings, and commercial and institutional clients will turn to us for leadership in creating jobs and getting their environmental projects completed with beauty and integrity. Los Angeles currently does not have a place like this in the entire county, there are many pieces to the puzzle, and we are putting them together to help accelerate our economic and environmental recovery.

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Youth Outreach Unit "Together We Create a Better Y.O.U."
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Demographic experts tell us that if juvenile crime rates for persons 10 to 17 continue to increase with expected youth population increases, the year 2010 will see the number of juvenile-committed violent crimes increase by nearly 15 percent. However, these projections do not have to be America's destiny. Over the past two years, there has been a decline in the rates of both murders committed by youth and youth violence in general. While the juvenile violent crime arrest rate increased 62% between 1987 and 1993, it decreased 2.9% in 1995, the first decline in seven years. As the problem of juvenile violence has grown, so has our understanding of the problem and some possible solutions. A small percentage of youth are responsible for the bulk of violent juvenile crime; most violent crimes committed by youth are committed against other juveniles; and many involve handguns and/or drug use. Violence is a learned behavior and children neglected, left alone, or uncared for, without appropriate role models, often do not learn right from wrong. Children who suffer abuse at the hands of family violence often learn that violence is natural, even expected. The success of our V2K Community Development Program has been positively correlated with a multitude of public service assistance. Experts agree that the best predictors of successful transition are: an intensively supportive environment, counseling, mentoring, education, drug treatment, and opportunities for employment. A highly structure multidisciplinary case plan and customized youth services are unavoidably intertwined as a means to successfully engage youth and propel them towards a productive future. The unique program design and topic courses that we have created with the target population in mind (i.e. safety, date rape, gang abatement, self-esteem, childcare, health care, rape crisis counseling, youth support, anger management, violence awareness, mentoring, academic assistance, communication, etc.) will especially benefit minors who have a propensity to engage in criminal and delinquent behavior. Many experts agree that the way one thinks, leads to the way an individual behaves. Delinquency and youth crime affect not only the victims, but has a “domino effect” on the entire community regardless of the severity of the crime. As youth crime prevails, community fear increases, public safety costs rise, and insecurities abound. It costs more than $40,000 annually to maintain a juvenile in a correctional facility. It costs about $4,000 a year to keep a young person in school. As a result of the erosion of the value of the “family”, the rising costs for education, an increase in prison construction, dilapidated school systems, and cutbacks in state and federal funding, agencies have to rethink their approach to program service delivery. Our ultimate challenge is to debunk various published statistics and promote awareness for what goes on in our community.

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Casa Amador
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The mission of Reach for the Top, Inc., is to address the plight of homeless and provide the support necessary for them to attain the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency to become to become permanently housed. Reach for the Top, Inc., provides transitional housing where clients can stabilize in a safe, nurturing, environment while receiving the assistance necessary to access the services that lead to permanent housing. Our goal is to send healthy, self-confident, competent persons back into society. This program will help reduce the tax money used to care for the chronically homeless. Our residents will no loner be in jails, Emergency Rooms, or shelter. They will be in their new home, stable, safe and supported. We will assist them in finding permanent housing. The proposed location of Casa Amador, 4801 West Adams was involved in the civil unrest of 1992. Almost 84% of commercial structures and 83% of residential structures were in need of repair, according to a California Redevelopment Association survey done in 1995. By developing this lot, it will aesthetically change the characteristics of this blighted area, encourage outside investment and provide much needed services to a neglected community. Providing stable transitional housing for the chronically homeless population that will also offer resources so residents can learn new skills, find employment, and finally find permanent housing will benefit the area greatly. These individuals will be supported so that they can succeed. Their success will bring hope to the neighborhood and elevate the entire area. This project specifically deals with women and children. For the children living at our facility they will have a better start to their day; providing them with the foundation to succeed in school and life. this will set them on the track to grow into conscientious citizens. Lastly our community center will be open to all individuals looking to participate or learn something new. This center will provide a place for people who might be on the edge of poverty. We would provide help to those who need it, keeping the potential homeless in their homes.

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Empowering students thru arts and education
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The main goal of the program is to prepare students for a post-secondary degree and ensure that they enroll and graduate from a higher institution of learning. This goal will be accomplished through intense academic preparation and promotion of empowerment. A supplemental goal of the program is to engage students in a project based learning environment centered on learning communities. Forming learning communities will help students develop interpersonal communication skills. It will afford students the ability to lead as well as work cooperatively in a productive manner with their peers. Project base learning breeds empowerment through ownership. Students are more likely to be engaged when their objectives are organic. The responsibility to ascertain knowledge is transferred from teacher to student placing the teacher in the role of mediator. This act in and of its self whether or notrecognized by the host is psychologically empowering. OBJECTIVE 1: CONCEPTUALIZE THE ROLE OF COLLEGE Demystifying higher learning and the negative perceptions associated with being an at risk student applying for college. An extensive foundational (preparation) curriculum has been designed to strengthen students’ preparedness and awareness about college. ACTIVITIES: learning modalitiies assessment; highly effective teen workshop OBJECTIVE 2: INDIVIDUALIZED ASSESSMENT PORTFOLIOS Focused instruction for SAT testing tailored to meet students’individual needs. Instructors use test proven material and address students’ learning styles. ACTIVITIES: SAT workshop including practice tests; Best Practices workshop OBJECTIVE 3: STRUCTURING CURRCIULUM THAT EMPOWER STUDENTS Program includes music service learning opportunities that promotes responsibility and empowers adolescents to impact their community. Participants will be given the opportunity to complete an original composition which demonstrates an application of the knowledge attained over the course of the program. The composition will be performed by the student. If students choose not to perform their project must be described extensively in narrative format using the language of music theory, music history, and music productionThe goal of the project is to inspire creativity and empower students. ACTIVITIES: Music lessons and recording/producing workshop. OUTCOMES: Students will be accepted to a four year university.

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Narrative Replacement Therapy: Reimagining the Heart of Los Angeles
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Narrative Replacement Therapy for La Placita Nueva will benefit Los Angeles by restoring its historic core, both physically and emotionally. Building off renewed interest in Downtown LA, Grand Park, and the growing transit system based at Union Station, the one-kilometer circle that is the subject area will unite everything from the LA River up to the Music Center, from Little Tokyo to Chinatown through a comprehensive masterplan to draw tourists, new residents, and new economies to the vibrant heart of the city.

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Establishing a Hub for Cleantech Innovation and Job Creation
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We will build new companies, that create new jobs, thereby revitalizing downtown Los Angeles’ industrial core. Broadly, we will bring back the industrial core of downtown Los Angeles by rebuilding it into the cleantech innovation and commercialization center of the region. As a result, this area will once again provide family-supporting jobs for Boyle Heights, Lincoln Heights, East Los Angeles, Central and South Los Angeles, and beyond. In the next 4 years alone just one of the envisioned projects of the Roadmap – the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator’s La Kretz Innovation Campus—will generate over 1700 jobs from companies who pay $45M per year in salaries and wages and generate more than $85M per year in sales. We will create a new industrial powerhouse dedicated to clean technologies and sustainable jobs. We fully expect that by 2050, the LA Arts and Innovation District on the banks of the Los Angeles River will be the leading cleantech innovation and commercialization hub in the world.

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Boys & Girls Club of Venice Learning Center Renovation
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According to UCLA Institute for Democracy, Education and Access, at Venice High for every 100 students in the class of 2008 who started 9th grade, only 39 graduated, and only 20 of those took the “A-G” courses needed for entrance to California’s colleges and universities. Among African American and Latino students there the numbers are even more dismal: only 31 graduated and only 12 finished A-G. Of our Club members at Venice High, 58% are Latino and 17% are African American, so most of our members are considered unlikely to graduate high school, much less go on to higher education. Our newly renovated Learning Center will provide youth with the support and skills needed to succeed in school, work, and life in the 21st century by increasing access to computer technology, offering case-managed academic assistance, informing and encouraging youth and their families to make an educational plan, and matching each youth with an adult mentor. The outcome we expect from enhancing our Learning Center will be: •75% of participants will move up at least one letter grade in math and english/reading. •60% of participants will move up at least one level on the California Standards Test scores in English/reading and math. Our evaluation consists of several strategies: •Mentoring -- We provide an adult mentor for every participant. Our Club already has over forty adult mentors working with our youth. In addition to Club staff, our group of mentors includes AP students from Venice High, college students, and adult community volunteers. We are always looking for more adult mentors. •Goals for Graduation – Monthly presentations will be held for all program participants introducing academic goal setting. Through incremental goal-setting, members create an action plan with daily and weekly goals leading to both short- and long-term gains. Included in the approach is a comprehensive guidance strategy that helps members connect their smallest results to their highest dreams. •Case Management will be used with all participants. Club staff will share information informally about individuals needing extra help on a weekly basis. They will also meet and discuss the progress and problems of all program participants formally on a monthly basis. When reports from volunteer mentors, teachers or administrators show a youth having poor scores or frequent absences, we can intervene immediately, before waiting for the next report card grading period.

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Award_topvotedidea
$1,000,000 in total grants
Circle-1-inactive Step1-title-submission-inactive

Submission Began
Tuesday, February 26

Submission Ended
Thursday, March 28
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-2-inactive Step2-title-voting-inactive

Voting Began
Tuesday, April 02

Voting Ended
Wednesday, April 17
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-3 Step3-title
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address
Homeboy Industries: Hope Has An Address

Winner Announced
Wednesday, May 08

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